Trips

Of Irish Interest.

 

http://newspapers.bc.edu/cgi-bin/bostonsh?a=d&d=BOSTONSH19030530-01.2.49&srpos=18&e=-------en-20--1--txt-txIN-wasted+irish------

 

 

 

The Sacred Heart Review, Volume 29, Number 22, 30 May 1903

 

THE IRISH IN AMERICAN LIFE.

 

 

 

Mr. Edward F. McSweeney's address on the Irish element in our population, before the Charitable Irish Society, last week, was not of the kind which we usually hear at St. Patrick's Day banquets and other occasions sacred to fiery oratory and race-glorification. It was, on the contrary, a thoughtful, well-prepared presentation of the position which the Irish have attained in American life, and contained striking arguments to prove that people of Irish blood must not, unless they wish to deteriorate, be content to rest on the laurels of their fathers. The following passages from Mr. McSweeney's address are well worthy of serious consideration: — The Irish-American can not ape Americanism; he must be content to be what he is, a member of a cleanblooded race, witlt honorable traditions and a magnificent history, if he wants to amount to anything. If he must set up some American for a model, let him try and live up to men of whom not only America, but the world, is proud. Loyalty to the government of the republic, fidelity to its political system and polity and a willingness at all times to preserve its integrity and defend its gooil name, are the tliin_s the United Stales requires from its citizens. The man who strives to make an Irishman into a Yankee, or a Yankee into an Irishman, spoils two fine types of humankind, and injures the republic

 

 

 

The Sacred Heart Review, Volume 28, Number 6, 9 August 1902

 

http://newspapers.bc.edu/cgi-bin/bostonsh?a=d&d=BOSTONSH19020809-01.2.46&srpos=20&e=-------en-20--1--txt-txIN-wasted+irish------

 

 

 

A resolution has been proposed and adopted without opposition in the Prussian Diet, requesting the ministry to prepare a bill to impose more rigid restrictions on the liquor traffic, says the Philadelphia Record. Count Douglas asserted that the Germans spend :!,0 ,0,000,000 marks ($750,000,000) a' year in drink; twice the amount of the combined army and navy budgets. One-third of the inmates of insane asylums in Germany are victims of intemperance, eighty per cent, of the idiots are the offspring of intemperate parents, and the number of persons convicted of crimes has increased from 299,249 in 1882 to 478,139 in 1899. -- i m The Irish magistrates seem to be waking up to a sense of their duty in the matter of license-granting. There is, at present, as we have before stated in these columns, a bill before the House of Lords which, if passed, will put an end to the promiscuous granting of licenses to

 

 

 

sell liquor in Ireland. Meanwhile we note that the deputy-lieutenants and magistrates of Kerry have met and passed the following resolution :— " That we approve of the bill now before the House of Lords putting a stay to the issue of new licenses, and for other purposes, and recommend that during the interval before it becomes law its enactments be taken as binding."

 

Freeman's Journal (Sydney, NSW : 1850 - 1932) Thu 23 Sep 1915 Page 10

 

http://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/115595806?searchTerm=Irish%20pattern%20day&searchLimits=

 

 

 

A deputation of the Irish National Teachers' Organisation waited upon Mr. Augustine

 

Birrell at the Home Office in reference to the mode of payment of teachers' salaries. At

 

present the salaries are paid quarterly. The desire of the teachers' is that they should be

 

paid monthly. The Chief Secretary was in full sympathy with the teachers,' but. said

 

that he was hampered by the Treasury

 

 

 


RACING: The 2014 Ballyheigue Races will take place on Sunday 28th December at 12:30pm.

Horse racing on the beach has been a traditional event in Ballyheigue for many years and generally takes place around the Christmas/New Year period. It is a fantastic spectacle that has to be seen to fully appreciate. The sight of the horses galloping along the strand with backdrop of Tralee Bay and a snow capped Brandon Mountain is one you will be sure to remember. The 2014 event marks the 46th meeting of racing in Ballyheigue with the original races dating all the way back to 1853.

In 2012, Mooney was awarded the Stalwart Award by the Cherokee National Historical Society. The award is given to a Cherokee Heritage Center supporter who has served as a longtime member, volunteer, employee, board member or associate and has significantly contributed to the center’s success.


Restored memorials to Thomas Scaife and Joseph Rutherford who both died in 1840 when the boiler of the locomotive they were working on exploded, they were buried  in St John’s Church Graveyard, in Bromsgrove. The accident led to the formation of the Institution of Mechanical Engineers (IME)

Read more: Railwaymen gravestone project wins national recognition | Bromsgrove Standard




POPE and HITLER

 

Snippet

from Dr Robert Moynihan.

historical truth about Pius' response to the tragedy of the Holocaust. Hence, this brief report to clarify the facts.

The petitioning organization, which does not claim to represent all Holocaust survivors, misrepresents Pius XII's actual record of constant help for the victims of the Third Reich's murderous racial policies.

And this was well known at the time, and not just by Catholics, but by many Jews and their representatives.

On November 29, 1945, a large group of Jewish survivors came to the Vatican, specifically "to thank His Holiness personally for the extraordinary generosity which he had shown them when they were persecuted during the frightful period of Nazi-Fascism."

Pius XII embraced them, saying: "The Holy See, faithful to the eternal principles, never has agreed, not even in the most hazardous moments, with concepts which the history of civilization will range among the most deplorable and ignominious aberrations of human thinking and feeling. Your presence here is meant to be an expression of gratitude from men and women who have experienced that in the exercise of charity, the Catholic Church and her real children know how to rise above the narrow and arbitrary limits drawn by human selfishness and race hatred." (Angelic Shepherd: the Life of Pope Pius XII, by Jan Olav Smit, New York: Dodd, Mead and Company, 1950, p. 154)

The claim that Pius XII was "silent" during the Holocaust is contradicted by his own wartime statements, and those who praised them after the war. When he died in 1958, the Jewish community hailed his wartime leadership, above all because he did "speak out."

Golda Meir, then Israel's Foreign Minister, reacted with this tribute: "We share in the grief of humanity at the passing away of His Holiness, Pope Pius XII. In a generation afflicted by wars and discords, he upheld the highest ideals of peace and compassion. When fearful martydom came to our people in the decade of Nazi terror, the voice of the Pope was raised in compassion for the victims."(Reuters, October 10,1958)

In his first encyclical, Summi Pontificatus (October, 1939), in his Christmas addresses, in his radio appeals, in his allocution to the College of Cardinals on June 2, 1943, Pius XII condemned race-based murder, and thus came to the clear, public defense of European Jews - a fact recognized at the time, even if it is generally ignored or denied today.

On October 1, 1942, the Times of London editorialized: "A study of the words which Pope Pius XII has addressed since his accession in encyclicals and allocutions to the Catholics of various nations leaves no room for doubt. He condemns the worship of force and its concrete manifestation in the suppression of national liberties and in the persecution of the Jewish race."

Charles Pichon, a leading wartime correspondent, described Pius XII's wartime addresses succinctly: "The pontifical texts condemned most strongly the anti-Semitic persecutions, the oppression of invaded lands, the inhuman conduct of the war, and also the deification of the Race, the State and the Class." (The Vatican and its Role in World Affairs, New York: E. P. Dutton, 1950, p. 167)

In reaction to his 1942 Christmas address, the Nazis themselves, furious about Pius XII's public stand, railed: "That this speech is directed exclusively against the New Order in Europe as seen in National Socialism is clear in the Papal statement that mankind owes a debt to ‘all who during the war have lost their Fatherland and who, although personally blameless have, simply on account of their nationality and origin, been killed or reduced to utter destitution.' Here he is virtually accusing the German people of injustice towards the Jews, and makes himself the mouthpiece of the Jewish war criminals." (The Vatican in the Age of the Dictators, 1922-1945, by Anthony Rhodes, New York: Holt, Rinehart and Winston, 1973, p.273).

Similar examples of Pius's anti-Nazi, pro-Jewish statements are found in the wartime issues of the Palestine Post, the New York Times, the Tablet of London and the Jewish press of various countries.

How is it possible, then, that anyone could say Pius XII was "silent" in the face of Nazi mass murder? There must be a reason - but perhaps the reason is not based on fact and truth. And this could be due to disinformation.

One source of what seems to be slander against Pope Pius is the Soviet propaganda machine which directed some of its efforts against Pius after the Second World War.

The Soviets had good reason to wish to weaken the moral authority of the Popes and of the Church: the Church was opposed to them in Eastern Europe, and elsewhere around the world.

The Communists employed the techniques of "misinformation" and "disinformation" with considerable skill - although in retrospect, the efforts sometimes seem clumsy enough, once the truth is made clear.

In the case of Pope Pius XII, this campaign climaxed in the now-discredited propaganda play, The Deputy, by Rolf Hochhuth (1963), which had a powerful impact on a world trying to understand the horror of Hitler's "Final Solution."

Suddenly, public opinion was mesmermized by Hochhuth's grotesque allegations that Pius was in a sense "Hitler's deputy," despite the actual historical record.

Among the first to refute the allegations against Pius was Robert M. W. Kempner, the Deputy Chief Prosecutor at Nuremberg and a Jewish refugee from Hitler's genocide. Having mastered the "relevant archives," he exposed the false allegation that Pius XII was silent, and that he failed to protest Hitler's unspeakable crimes, and that that is how they came to reach the proportions they did: "Both the premise and the conclusion drawn from it are equally untenable. The archives of the Vatican, of the diocesan authorities and of Ribbentrop's Foreign Ministry contain a whole series of protests - direct and indirect, diplomatic and public, secret and open." (Hungarian Jewry and the Papacy: Pius XII was Not Silent, by Jeno Levai, London: Sands and Company, p. X).

As for the claim that the Vatican is holding back key documents regarding Pius's actions, thousands of relevant documents have already been made public, and thousands more are being prepared for release. The process is slow because of the number of documents and necessity that each be carefully handled. From 1965-1981, the Holy See published 12 thick volumes of wartime documents (Actes et Documents), four of which deal with the Holy See's humanitarian assistance alone. It's clear that many of Pius's most inveterate critics have never even consulted them, much less fully acknowledged what they contain. Father Robert Graham, one of the 12-volume collection's editors, describes their importance: "They embrace every imaginable form of activity to help stricken mankind without discrimination."

With regard to the Pope's impassioned response to the Holocaust, Graham continued: "It is impossible to portray in a few words the extensive correspondence of the Vatican in reference to the deportation of the European Jews, particularly for the years 1942 to 1944. Nearly every world Jewish rescue organization at work in the field is represented. Appearing in the list of organizations whose appeals to the Holy See were readily acted on are: the World Jewish Congress (both the London and Geneva centers), the American Jewish Congress, the Jewish Agency for Palestine, Agudas Israel, the Emergency Committee to save the Jews of Europe, the American Jewish Committee, the Union of Orthodox Rabbis of the United States and Canada.

Prominent Jewish leaders in view included Rabbi Isaac Herzog of Jerusalem, and Chief Rabbi Hertz of England." ("The Good Samaritan in World War II," Catholic League Newsletter, May 15, 1989)

As Dimitri Cavalli showed, in his article, "The Good Samaritan: Jewish Praise for Pope Pius XII," originally published in Inside the Vatican (October, 2000), Actes and Documents, as well as the Jewish wartime press, chronicle and record Pius XII's extraordinary efforts on behalf of persecuted Jews, and the Jewish community's extremely high praise of him. (Here is a link to the story: http://www.ewtn.com/library/ISSUES/PIUS12GS.HTM).

The War Refugee Board, created by President Roosevelt to aid Europe's persecuted Jews, was keenly aware of the key role the Vatican played. In his final Summary Report (September 15, 1945), Executive Director John H. Pehle wrote: "The Holy See and the Vatican hierarchy throughout Europe were solicited time and again for special assistance both as a channel of communication to the leaders and people of enemy territory, and as a means of rendering direct aid to suffering victims of Hitler. The Catholic clergy saved and protected many thousands and the Vatican rendered invaluable assistance to the Board and to the persecuted in Nazi hands." (Cited in "Relations of Pius XII and the Catholic Community and Jewish Organizations," by Father Robert A. Graham, S.J., in The Italian Refuge: Rescue of Jews During the Holocaust, edited by Ivo Herzer, Washington: Catholic University of America Press, 1989, p. 232)

Among Pius XII's impressive (but least known) achievements are the establishment of the Pontifical Relief Commission, and the Vatican Information Office. The first distributed massive amounts of food, medicine and clothing to people of all creeds and nationalities, throughout war-torn Europe; the second fielded millions of wartime inquiries, on prisoners of war and other missing or displaced people, helping re-unite countless desperate families. In 2004, the Vatican, adding to the abundance of material in Actes et Documents, released over 1,500 pages of new documentation on this extraordinary agency, showing the depth and breath of Pius XII's creation. Some of Pius XII's interventions for Jews was so great that it actually stirred complaints from others who believed Pius had a "preference" for them ("Pius XII's Aid to Jews was so Great that it Stirred Protests," Zenit News Agency, July 4, 2004; Link: http://www.ewtn.com/library/ISSUES/ZP12JWS.HTM.)

In a sense, that was true: those most at risk garnered Pius's most immediate attention, though everyone suffering came under his loving concern.

A prime example of the Pope's concerted efforts on behalf of Jews occurred during the German Occupation of Rome (Sept. 1943-June, 1944), as both Michael Tagliacozzo and Sr. Grazia Loparco have documented. Tagliacozzo, a Roman Jew who was himself a survivor of the Nazi roundup of Rome's Jews in 1943, and the outstanding authority on that event, has testified that Pius XII "was the only one who intervened to impede the deportation of Jews on October 16, 1943, and he did very much to hide and save thousands of us. It was no small matter that he ordered the opening of cloistered convents. Without him, many of our own would not be alive." ("Jewish Historian Praises Pius XII's Wartime Conduct," Zenit News Agency, October 26, 2000; link: http://academics.smcvt.edu/pcouture/jewish_historian_praises_pius_xi.htm).

Sr. Loparco, also a top scholar of the period, adds: "From the documentation and testimonies emerges evidence of the full support and instruction of Pius XII.... Many concrete events, such as the opening of cloistered monasteries and convents, prove the fact that many Jews were lodged because of the direct concern of the Vatican, which also provided food and assistance." ("When Rome's Religious Houses Saved Jews," Zenit News Agency, January 21, 2005; link: http://www.zenit.org/article-12040?l=english).

The Underlying Meaning

Pope Benedict will visit Rome's synagogue to promote Catholic-Jewish understanding.

The half-truths and propaganda concerning Pius XII should not cloud the occasion.

Anyone inclined to confront Benedict with historical myths and inaccuracies would do well to recall the message of gratitude Isaac Herzog, the chief Rabbi of Jerusalem, sent to Pius for his efforts to confront the Nazi terror in 1944: "The people of Israel will never forget what His Holiness and his illustrious delegates, inspired by the eternal principles of religion which form the very foundations of true civilization, are doing for our unfortunate brothers and sisters in this most tragic hour of history, which is living proof of divine providence in this world." (February 28, 1944, Actes et Documents, volume X, pp. 291-292).

In addition, Pius's detractors might want recall what Rome's former chief rabbi, Dr. Elio Toaff, said at the time of Pius XII's death in 1958: "More than any other people, the Italian Jews had experienced the great pity and supreme generosity of the Pontiff during the unhappy years of persecution and terror, when it seemed to them they had no way of escape. His Jewish compatriots will everlastingly remember with gratitude the papal ruling to open the doors of convents and parish houses to them. The Jewish community is in mourning for the death of Pius XII and with sincere sentiments it raises its prayers to the Lord that he may grant his generous and chosen soul every beatitude." (The Tablet of London, October 25, 1958).

 

 

 

The Martyrs of the September Massacre

 

http://www.regnumnovum.com/2011/09/02/the-martyrs-of-the-september-massacre/

Sep 2nd, 2011 by Omar F. A. Gutierrez

Imagine a slaughter of over 1,200 people in two days, almost 200 hundred of them Catholic priests. Imagine a slaughter performed by a maddened mob, a slaughter justified by the hope for a godless future where only the mind was of import. Well, this is what is commemorated on this day for the Feast of the Martyrs of September.

 

 

King Louis XVI

In the rancor of the late Summer of 1792, the revolutionaries who were building their great society in France were becoming more and more impatient with the pace of change. It seemed clear to many that King Louis XVI was only stalling on reforms in the hope that foreign monarchs might come to his rescue. Fredrick Wilhelm II of Prussia, for instance, didn’t want this revolution business spreading and saw the unrest in France as a chance to take Alsace and Lorraine.

Invasions into France by Prussia and Austria had already began in the Spring, and the French had already mobilized a larger but less organized army to meet the oncoming forces. Indeed, it was at this time that Roget de Lisle wrote “The Marseillaise,” which is today the French National Anthem.

Back in Paris various revolutionary factions came to an agreement that with war in the Northeast and so close to the capital, extreme measures needed to be taken against any royalist sympathizers. Though the constitution allowed for salaries for priests, the Legislative Assembly voted to strip priests and religious of their funds and throw them all into jail.

At the King’s palace, known as Château Tuileries, huge crowds demanded the King reverse his vetoes protecting the priests and imprison them as they were doubtless collaborators with the invading armies. One man, with sword pointed at the King who sat at a large outdoor table calmly and mildly perturbed, said,

I demand the sanction of the decree against the priests; …either the sanction or you shall die!

“Liberty, equality and fraternity” was the motto for the French Revolution but those words applied only to some. Despite the law, mobs of revolutionaries led by men like Georges Danton and Jean-Paul Marat rounded up priests and sent them off to be imprisoned at various monasteries within the city.

This was June, and the Assembly decided the King needed to be gotten rid of, so they called for national guards. The contingent from Marseilles sang “The Marseillaise” all the way to Paris, which is why it has its name.

In July, the city received a shock. The Duke of Brunswick-Lüneberg, Charles William Ferdinand, issued a manifesto pledging that the armies of the King of Prussia had their sites on Paris in order to liberate King Louis XVI from the revolution. He wrote:

The city of Paris and all its inhabitants shall be required to submit at once and without delay to the King…. Their Majesties declare…that if the Chateau of the Tuileries is entered by force or attacked, if the least violence be offered to…the King, and the Queen, and the royal family, and if their safety and liberty be not immediately assured, they will inflict an ever memorable vengeance by delivering over the city of Paris to military execution and complete destruction.

The response from the revolutionaries? On August 10, a mob of nine thousand persons, eight hundred of whom were national guards, were sent by Marat and the Commune of Paris – a kind of city council – to depose the King.

Louis XVI was being protected by about 900 Swiss guards. In order to avoid bloodshed, he opened the gates to the Tuileries in order, one imagines, to try to calm the crowd down and listen. The mob refused to be swayed, though. The Swiss guards pressed them back. A shot was fired, and hell let loose. The Swiss were slaughtered or imprisoned, where they were later tortured and killed anyway. The cooks and servants at the palace were all killed. It was a festival of violence, and the Legislative Assembly charged with maintaining the constitution did nothing. The King and his family were imprisoned in the Temple.

 

The Attack on Tuileries

The next day the Assembly ended all Catholic schools in Paris. The day after that it outlawed the wearing of religious habits or vestments in public. On August 18, the Assembly passed a national suppression of all Catholic institutions and religious orders, and ordered that any priests who did not swear an oath to the Civil Constitution of the Clergy, which in 1790 had already banned monastic vows, and had seized all Church property for the State, would have two weeks to leave the country. Some 25,000 priests left then, and so it was that the French Revolution had begun to supplant the Catholic faith in France with a new religion, a new faith in the State.

At this same time Marat and others in the Commune of Paris were pressuring the Legislative Assembly to just dispatch the prisoners right away. On August 19 he wrote in his newsletter:

The wisest and best course to pursue is to go armed to the Abbaye [a prison], drag out the traitors, especially the Swiss officers [of the royal guard] and their accomplices, and put them to the sword. What folly it is to give them a trial.

What folly indeed.

On Sunday, September 2, news reached Paris that the Prussians had taken Verdun. The path was open for the Duke of Brunswick to come and enforce the terror he had -promised if the King were harmed. Thus, it was now or never. A force had to be sent to meet the oncoming army, but the soldiers in Paris would not leave while all the sympathizers in prison still lived. Their new faith would not allow such heresy to remain. This is how William and Ariel Durant put it:

On September 2 [the new religion] put on its Sunday clothes, and expressed its devotion in diverse ways. Young and middle-aged men gathered at recruiting points to volunteer for service in the Army. Women lovingly sewed warm garments for them, and grimly prepared bandages for prospective wounds. Men, women, and children came to their section centers to offer weapons, jewelry, money for the war. Mothers adopted children dependent upon soldiers or nurses who were leaving for the front. Some men went to the prisons to kill priests and other enemies of the new faith.

Danton, a mountain of a man who’s ugliness was rivaled only by his remarkable ability with rhetoric, addressed the Legislative Assembly and asked for the permission to kill. He said,

The tocsin we shall sound is not the alarm signal of danger; it orders the charge on the enemies of the France. To conquer we have to dare, to dare again, always to dare – and France is saved.

Dare they did. At 2:00pm that same day thirty priests were being transported to the Abbaye jail. As the carriages arrived, they were attacked. The guards joined in and all the priests were killed. But the mob had only started. They continued to the former Carmelite convent at which 150 priests, religious and one layman were being held.

Blessed John Mary de Lau, the Archbishop of Arles, Blessed Francis Joseph de la Rochefoucauld, the Bishop of Beauvais, his brother Blessed Peter Louis, the Bishop of Saintes and several others were praying Vespers in the chapel when the mob attacked. Nearly all were killed with only about 40 who were let go or who managed to escape. Says Fr. Butler:

Among the victims were Blessed Ambrose Augustine Chevreux, superior general of the Maurist Benedictines, and two other monks; Blessed Francis Louis Hébert, confessor of Louis XVI; three Franciscans; fourteen ex-Jesuits; six diocesan vicars general; thirty-eight members or former members of the Saint-Sulpice seminary; three deacons; an acolyte; and a Christian Brother. The bodies were buried some in a pit in the cemetery of the Vaugirard and some in a well in the garden of the Carmes.

At one point the mob brought the priests forward to face a mock judge and to be invited to take the oath once again. When the oath was refused, the priest was sent down a gauntlet of swords, pikes, cudgels, foul language and spittle.

Eventually these demonic actors became tired. So they stopped, only to take up the work the next day. The mob went to the Lazarist seminary where many other priests were held. They too lost their life, one of them being thrown out a window. When there were no more priests, the mob moved on to other prisoners. All in all, the September Massacre lasted three days, with death figures between 1,247 and 1,368. Of these 191 were Catholics who refused to compromise their faith, and so were beatified in 1926 by Pope Pius XI.

For my part, I cannot help but wonder where we are today. The bitterest of atheist anger that is seemingly so often leveled against Christians concerns me. Matthew Archbold notes how the great atheist movie “The Ledge” bombed at the theatre, but isn’t it astonishing that an atheist felt a ham-fisted, propagandist movie was necessary in the first place? Then the venerable William Odie notes how the London Times has just so matter-of-factly decided that God doesn’t exist. Take all that with the news from Illinois that the State may break ties with Catholic Charities there because they won’t place children for adoption with homosexual couples…never minding the fact that the policy also extends to non-married hetero couples. Then of course there is the attack against conscience from Health and Human Services requiring health-care plans to cover contraceptives.

 

Georges Danton

I’m not saying that I suspect priests or you or I will be rounded up tomorrow and slaughtered. What I am saying is that the world hates us. The devil and the world want to see us fail, and while the tools of the enemy may not be swords and pikes, the attack on the family and on conscience is an attack nonetheless. The motivation and the end are the same.

But also, there is hope. The list of martyrs on this day, which you can find below, reminds us that our sufferings are minor compared to theirs. A bishop from a troubled African nation visited recently, and he related how he lost a few priests in the civil war there. The rebels were not particularly anti-Christian. They just wanted to throw their weight around and so killed a couple of priests. Such perspective is good for us. We are not being shot at.

Furthermore, we are reminded of the consolation of heaven, that sweet homeland which deserves the kind of dedication to take a priest to lay their life down. Do I love heaven and the Christ who is King there enough? About this King, do I serve Him well? Am I a loyal subject, or a revolutionary who wants to do my own thing, carry on my own revolution.

I thought you should know that Jean-Paul Marat was murdered by a young woman named Charlotte Corday on July 13, 1793 while he was taking a bath. As she was taken up to the guillotine to die, she is reported to have said, “I killed one man to save 100,000.” Well, perhaps we might forgive her her moral relativism. It was a tumultuous time.

As for Georges Danton, he converted to the Catholic Faith thanks in part to his wife. He was arrested by the revolution for daring to demand that the continued massacre of people end. So on April 5, 1794 he was guillotined, though not before prophesying the mess left behind. He said:

I leave it all in a frightful welter; not a man of them has an idea of government. Robespierre will follow me; he is dragged down by me. Ah, better be a poor fisherman than meddle with the government of men!

The “poor fisherman” remark was probably a reference to St. Peter, and Robespierre was also executed just was a few months later.

 

 

Asylum for widows and children Toronto 1847/48

Matt Tierney a 14y sent to Dr Barton, Ellen Nash a 25y sent to W H Edward,

Hugh Tierney a 10y sent to James Johnson Wagon Maker,

John Gallivan a 16y sent to Richard Butler a Smith, Peggy Purcell a 7y sent to John Desmond, Kitty Casey a 12y to John Connor a Farmer, Mary Casey a 10y to Peter Ouster, Peter Kearns a9y to Michael O Connor a farmer,

Michael Kearns a 7y to Michael Noland a farmer, Pat Grant 13y to Chas Doherty a farmer of Toronto Town'p, Martin Grant a 6y to Joe Auger a Farmer, Anne Noon a10y to Tom Cunningham a farmer, John Noon a 10y to Do, Bernard Flaherty a 10y to John Callaghan,

 

 

 


Data Old 3

 

Duagh Cards
Fr John P Kennelly Mill Hill d Aug 4th 1965 a 65.
Br Bonifice Dower Enniskillen d 24-1-1958.
Br Eugenius Dower Cobh d 29th July 1954. A 57.
Mary Dower Rathoran d 14-3-1976.
Tim O Brien Purt d 28-41966 a 85.
Ellen O Connell Rea d 14th Oct 1967 a 77.
Jer Hickey Rathoran d 27-12-1957 a 69.
Sean Harnett d 6-3-1974 a 53 Sydney Hospital.
Pat Dower Rathoran 23-3-1954 a 70.
Wm. Sexton Rathoran d 18-2-1962 a 70.
John Joe Dower USA ? d Sept 8th 1957.
Ml O Sullivan Rathoran d 19th June 1948 a 27.
Liom O Dobair Seanamaca d 1-12-1941 a 73.
Wm. Dower Lexington Ave d 11-2-1956.
Sean O Keane Terenure d 2nd Nov 1983 a 62.
Sheamus Kennelly Smearlagh d 4-4-1987 a 61.
Bridget Harnett Rathoran d 20th Aug 1957 a 74.
Wm. M O Donnell Kilconlea d 10-12-1963 a 74.
Bridget Walsh Seanamhaca d 19-3-1963 a 87.
Risteard Breathnach Seanamhaca d 12 Nov 1950 a 86.
Maurice Twomey Rathoran d 19th May 1936 a 72.
Esther Dillon Knockanoone 27-12-1973 a 81.
Eileen Dower Dromcondra d 16-1-1993.
Elizabeth Dower d 10-4-1969.
Mary Broderick Purt d 12-2-1961.
Fr Dan J Keane Co Durham Ord. 1929 d 23-4-1962.
Pat O Donnell Dromtrasna d 10th Nov 191951 a 73.
Wm. Dillon Knockanoone d 12th July 1952 a 74.
Mce O Donnell Convent St. d 19-2-1974 a 83.
Nora Broderick Knocknisnaw d 7-2-1969.
James Kennelly Woodford d 30th July 1951 a 54.
Mrs Catherine Kennelly Smerla d 28-2-1953 a 58.
Pat O Sullivan Rathoran d 24-1-1963.
Eileen Kirby Rylane d 10th Nov 1952 a 31.
Mrs Mary Relihan Knockadireen d 4-4-1959 a 40.
Pat Carroll Purt d 22-3-1966 a 54.
Ann Flynn Annestown Waterford d 28-2-1994 a 44.
Pat Harnett Magheramore Wicklow.
Eliz Twomey Rathoran d 4th July 1972.
Fergus Mc Donald Banagher Co Offally
Philomena Mulvaney Kells 13th Aug 1988 a 58 .
Brid O Sullivan Rathoran d 29-12-1988 a 90.
Wm. O Shea Rathoran d 9th Nov 1990 a 76.
Edward Twomey Rathoran d 27th Aug 1976 a 78.
Francis Carroll Purt d 11th July 1976 a 79.
Anna M Crowe AIB House Hospital d 7-12-1972.
Ml Broderick Purt d 8th Aug 1987 a 77.
Stephen Galvin Gortaclahane d 22nd June 1971 a 89.
Mary Kelly Lahardane D 24th Oct 1985 .
Jack Relihan Knockadireen 13-4-1995 a 92.
Wm. O Connell Kilmorna d24th Sept 1994 a 70yrs.
Denis O Sullivan Rathoran d 9-12-1991 a 54.
Dan Heffernan Kilmorna d 12-2-1990 a 66.
David Pat Mary O Connor Rathoran d 29-4-1983 a 21.
Breda Lenihan Kingsland d 1991.
Sean Harnett Purt d 1994.
Rina Quirke Rathoran d 1st Aug 1991 a 70.
Bridget Mc Carthy Meenoline Templeglantine.
Philomena Mulvany Kells d 13th Aug 1988 a 58.
Pat Lenihan Purt d 10-1-1978 a 70.
Oliver Harnett Rathoran d 25th Aug 1958 a 6 yrs.
Sr. M Patricia Dillon Pres. Waterford d 31st Aug 1987 a 61.
Mrs Ellen [Ciss] O Brien Purt d 7th Nov 1977 a 73.
Mary HeneghanJames Quirke Rathoran d 10th Nov 1983 a 64.
Mgt O Donnell Bogmount d 14th Aug 1975 a 81.
James O Shea Rathoran d 12-3-1973 a 67.
Mrs O Donnell Purt d 21-2-1986 a 72.
Mrs Nora Broderick Purt d 11-2-1985 a 68.
James Quirke Rathoran d 10th Nov 1983 a 64.
Mgt O Donnell Bogmount d 14th Aug 1975 a 81.
James O Shea Rathoran d 12-3-1973 a 67.
Mrs O Donnell Purt d 21-2-1986 a 72.
Mrs Nora Broderick Purt d 11-2-1985 a 68.
James Quirke Rathoran d 10th Nov 1983 a 64.
Mgt O Donnell Bogmount d 14th Aug 1975 a 81.
James O Shea Rathoran d 12-3-1973 a 67.
Mrs O Donnell Purt d 21-2-1986 a 72.
Mrs Nora Broderick Purt d 11-2-1985 a 68.
James Quirke Rathoran d 10th Nov 1983 a 64.
Mgt O Donnell Bogmount d 14th Aug 1975 a 81.
James O Shea Rathoran d 12-3-1973 a 67.
Mrs O Donnell Purt d 21-2-1986 a 72.
Mrs Nora Broderick Purt d 11-2-1985 a 68.
James Quirke Rathoran d 10th Nov 1983 a 64.
Mgt O Donnell Bogmount d 14th Aug 1975 a 81.
James O Shea Rathoran d 12-3-1973 a 67.
Mrs O Donnell Purt d 21-2-1986 a 72.
Mrs Nora Broderick Purt d 11-2-1985 a 68.
James Quirke Rathoran d 10th Nov 1983 a 64.
Mgt O Donnell Bogmount d 14th Aug 1975 a 81.
James O Shea Rathoran d 12-3-1973 a 67.
Mrs O Donnell Purt d 21-2-1986 a 72.
Mrs Nora Broderick Purt d 11-2-1985 a 68.
James Quirke Rathoran d 10th Nov 1983 a 64.
Mgt O Donnell Bogmount d 14th Aug 1975 a 81.
James O Shea Rathoran d 12-3-1973 a 67.
Mrs O Donnell Purt d 21-2-1986 a 72.
Mrs Nora Broderick Purt d 11-2-1985 a 68.
James Quirke Rathoran d 10th Nov 1983 a 64.
Mgt O Donnell Bogmount d 14th Aug 1975 a 81.
James O Shea Rathoran d 12-3-1973 a 67.
Mrs O Donnell Purt d 21-2-1986 a 72.
Mrs Nora Broderick Purt d 11-2-1985 a 68.
James Quirke Rathoran d 10th Nov 1983 a 64.
Mgt O Donnell Bogmount d 14th Aug 1975 a 81.
James O Shea Rathoran d 12-3-1973 a 67.
Mrs O Donnell Purt d 21-2-1986 a 72.
Mrs Nora Broderick Purt d 11-2-1985 a 68.
James Quirke Rathoran d 10th Nov 1983 a 64.
Mgt O Donnell Bogmount d 14th Aug 1975 a 81.
James O Shea Rathoran d 12-3-1973 a 67.
Mrs O Donnell Purt d 21-2-1986 a 72.
Mrs Nora Broderick Purt d 11-2-1985 a 68.
James Quirke Rathoran d 10th Nov 1983 a 64.
Mgt O Donnell Bogmount d 14th Aug 1975 a 81.
James O Shea Rathoran d 12-3-1973 a 67.
Mrs O Donnell Purt d 21-2-1986 a 72.
Mrs Nora Broderick Purt d 11-2-1985 a 68.
James Quirke Rathoran d 10th Nov 1983 a 64.
Mgt O Donnell Bogmount d 14th Aug 1975 a 81.
James O Shea Rathoran d 12-3-1973 a 67.
Mrs O Donnell Purt d 21-2-1986 a 72.
Mrs Nora Broderick Purt d 11-2-1985 a 68.
James Quirke Rathoran d 10th Nov 1983 a 64.
Mgt O Donnell Bogmount d 14th Aug 1975 a 81.
James O Shea Rathoran d 12-3-1973 a 67.
Mrs O Donnell Purt d 21-2-1986 a 72.
Mrs Nora Broderick Purt d 11-2-1985 a 68.
James Quirke Rathoran d 10th Nov 1983 a 64.
Mgt O Donnell Bogmount d 14th Aug 1975 a 81.
James O Shea Rathoran d 12-3-1973 a 67.
Mrs O Donnell Purt d 21-2-1986 a 72.
Mrs Nora Broderick Purt d 11-2-1985 a 68.
James Quirke Rathoran d 10th Nov 1983 a 64.
Mgt O Donnell Bogmount d 14th Aug 1975 a 81.
James O Shea Rathoran d 12-3-1973 a 67.
Mrs O Donnell Purt d 21-2-1986 a 72.
Mrs Nora Broderick Purt d 11-2-1985 a 68.
Maynooth d 9th Aug 1987 a 75.
David Lenihan Purt d 25-12-1982 a 74.
John O Sullivan Station House Castleisland d 1982 a 57.
Michael O Donnell Purt died 7th October 1984 a 72
Mrs Mgt Enright Purt d 22- 4- 1987 a 86
Pat Broderick Purt d 8- 1- 1987 a 84
Tom Relihan Knockadireen d 25th - 3- 1982 a 80 years
Fr Michael Leen CC Duagh Ord 1947 d 1975, 28th Jan.
Cathleen Begley Bridge Street d May 1981 a 52
Ellen O Shea Rathoran died 23rd 4th - 1971 a 89
Mce O Donnell Convent Street d 19 - 2nd - 1974 a 83
Nora Mary O Brian Purt d 20th - 3rd - 1985
Larry O Brian Purt d 18th - 3- 1994 a 85y
Hannah Stack Rea d 21st of May 1984 a 84
David O Connor Rathoran d 13th June 1989 a 75.
John O Connor Rathoran d 6th May 1966 a 91.
Mgt O Connor Rathoran d 13-3-1980 a 95.
Bridget O Sullivan Rathoran d 1988.
Jer Lenihan Purt d 29th May 1984 a 81..
Pat Broderick Purt d 8-1-1987 a 84.
Catherine Begley Br. St Abbeyfeale d 3-1--1990 a 89.
Jim Harnett Rockmount Ennis d 22-12-1987 a 60.
Brid Mc Carthy Meenoline d 19th June 1989 a 72.
James Quirke Rathoran d 10th Nov 1983 a 64.
Mgt O Donnell Bogmount d 14th Aug 1975 a 81.
James O Shea Rathoran d 12-3-1973 a 67.
Mrs O Donnell Purt d 21-2-1986 a 72.
Mrs Nora Broderick Purt d 11-2-1985 a 68.

Donald F. Kennelly of Bellevue died Nov. 2, 2000, in Bellevue. He was 79.

Born Oct. 15, 1921, in Camden, N.J., he moved to Washington in 1966 and to Bellevue in 1988. He served in the Army and Air Force, was a World War II Bataan survivor, prisoner of war in Japan and a Purple Heart recipient. After the war, he worked as a steel mill finisher and became a member of the Disabled American Vets.

Survivors include his son, Donald J. Kennelly, of New Orleans; brother, John M. Kennelly, of Kirkland; sister, Catherine Botch, of Bellevue; and three grandchildren.

A funeral Mass will take place at 11 a.m. tomorrow at Sacred Heart Catholic Church. Following the service and reception, the burial will take place at 12:30 p.m. at Sunset Hills Memorial Park.

Green's Bellevue Funeral Home is in charge of the arrangements.

Doherty
Shanahan Bishop
Dear Jer,
How have you been? I am sending this note to both addresses - I am not sure which one you prefer (or check more frequently), but please let me know.
I have "Newtownsandes Online" bookmarked and check it periodically. I was just looking at the section on Knockanure and Moyvane Sisters and saw the 3 children of Matt Doherty and Ellen Lyston who became nuns. The latter two I found in the Annals of the Presentation Sisters in Tralee (through the auspices of Fr. Jimmy Kissane - R.I.P.). I am sure I wouldn't have seen these records had he not interceded for me. I will miss my visits with him. He was so interested in the family history. Here is some information from the Presentation Annals:
Kate (or Catherine) Doherty was called in Religion "Sister Mary Austin Joseph of the Sacred Heart" entering the convent on 16 February 1871, took the habit of the congregation on 15 September 1871, and made her profession on 16 September 1873.
Ellen Doherty was called in Religion "Sister Mary David Joseph of the Face of Jesus" entering the convent on 23 February 1869, took the habit of the congregation on 14 September 1869, and made her profession on 15 September 1871.
Obviously, the Loreto Sister would not appear in the Presentation Annals, but I assume that Cyril Jane Doherty was Janette, the youngest child of Matt and Ellen.
I am glad to see more being added to the web site. I see extracts from the 1901 Census (Irish Speakers), Tithe Applotment Books, etc. Keep it up!
I hope all is well with you and your family and look forward to seeing you in September, God willing.
Richard M. DohertyDear Jer,
How have you been? I am sending this note to both addresses - I am not sure which one you prefer (or check more frequently), but please let me know.
I have "Newtownsandes Online" bookmarked and check it periodically. I was just looking at the section on Knockanure and Moyvane Sisters and saw the 3 children of Matt Doherty and Ellen Lyston who became nuns. The latter two I found in the Annals of the Presentation Sisters in Tralee (through the auspices of Fr. Jimmy Kissane - R.I.P.). I am sure I wouldn't have seen these records had he not interceded for me. I will miss my visits with him. He was so interested in the family history. Here is some information from the Presentation Annals:
Kate (or Catherine) Doherty was called in Religion "Sister Mary Austin Joseph of the Sacred Heart" entering the convent on 16 February 1871, took the habit of the congregation on 15 September 1871, and made her profession on 16 September 1873.
Ellen Doherty was called in Religion "Sister Mary David Joseph of the Face of Jesus" entering the convent on 23 February 1869, took the habit of the congregation on 14 September 1869, and made her profession on 15 September 1871.
Obviously, the Loreto Sister would not appear in the Presentation Annals, but I assume that Cyril Jane Doherty was Janette, the youngest child of Matt and Ellen.
I am glad to see more being added to the web site. I see extracts from the 1901 Census (Irish Speakers), Tithe Applotment Books, etc. Keep it up!
I hope all is well with you and your family and look forward to seeing you in September, God willing.
Richard M. DohertyDear Jer,
How have you been? I am sending this note to both addresses - I am not sure which one you prefer (or check more frequently), but please let me know.
I have "Newtownsandes Online" bookmarked and check it periodically. I was just looking at the section on Knockanure and Moyvane Sisters and saw the 3 children of Matt Doherty and Ellen Lyston who became nuns. The latter two I found in the Annals of the Presentation Sisters in Tralee (through the auspices of Fr. Jimmy Kissane - R.I.P.). I am sure I wouldn't have seen these records had he not interceded for me. I will miss my visits with him. He was so interested in the family history. Here is some information from the Presentation Annals:
Kate (or Catherine) Doherty was called in Religion "Sister Mary Austin Joseph of the Sacred Heart" entering the convent on 16 February 1871, took the habit of the congregation on 15 September 1871, and made her profession on 16 September 1873.
Ellen Doherty was called in Religion "Sister Mary David Joseph of the Face of Jesus" entering the convent on 23 February 1869, took the habit of the congregation on 14 September 1869, and made her profession on 15 September 1871.
Obviously, the Loreto Sister would not appear in the Presentation Annals, but I assume that Cyril Jane Doherty was Janette, the youngest child of Matt and Ellen.
I am glad to see more being added to the web site. I see extracts from the 1901 Census (Irish Speakers), Tithe Applotment Books, etc. Keep it up!









Re: Shanahan Family History
Posted by: Mary Fennell Date: April 21, 2001 at 05:57:54
In Reply to: Re: Shanahan Family History by Jer Kennelly of 388


Hi Jer,

We've corresponded re Kennelly family of Ballylongford, but I also have Shanahan ancestors. A Sylvester Shanahan came to US in about 1825. Had offspring, Jeremiah and John, who became Catholic bishops ofarrisburg PA. Any connection?

Mary

 

Mulvihill ; Hello Jer ( what is that short for ? Jeremy ) Enclosed is info. re Mulvihill line that we are trying to find help with. Geneaologosists seem to recommend working backwards through the family tree, so that is what I am attempting.
DETAILS. ( Dorothy sent a few of these queries )
1. Is there a contact to find out information re. Baptismal records from diocese of Kerry for Parish Church of Moyvanne for Thomas Mulvihill, born 1830.
2. Is there a listing for Johanna Scanlan Born 1826 ? 1827 for the same area.
3. Help to obtainn a marriage certificate from Guernsey re Thomas and Johannas marriage 1855.
4. Any helpful sites on the internet to help us in our research.
Furhter info re MULVIHILL.
Thomas Mulvihill son of Micheal and Ellen Mulvihill of Newtown Sandes County Kerry Civil Parish of Murher Poor Law Union. Listowel Iraghticonnor Barony.
I feel all Mulvihills are related ( one of the replies per. e-mail " we are knee deep in Mulvihills !! ) It is just trying to obtain the history of at least 3 of the above mentioned names to help push us further along the branch.
It is the Year Of The Volunteer here in Queensland australia, doyou have that over your way. Areas wouldn't function without volunteers. I am a volunteer with Little Haven Palliative Care and also the Cancer fund.
Thank you in anticipation of receiving some help, no matter how samll. If there is any other info. you may need, please e-mail and I will respond.
Postal address - Anne Morrisson,
' Freshwater '
M.S. 372,
Cullinane Road,
SEXTON 4570
Queensland - AustraliaHello Jer and thanks for the info. The Kennelly you mention is that a different or correct spelling of the Ellen Connell / Connolly / who married a Mulvihill we are looking for ? Do you know of a web site for the Catholic church in Guernsey ( i.e. similar to the page I found re. Newtonsandes ) I have a scanner but haven't had any success at the moment using same. The name we are looking for initially is MULVIHILL, but any info you send is greatly appreciated. With thanks Anne MStill hoping that I can receive some information with regard to MULVIHILL. Micheal and Ellen of Newtown Sandes town County Kerry Civil Parish of Murher Poor Law Union ( what does that mean ? ) Listowel. One of their children - Thomas married Johanna Scanlon in Guernsey Channel Isles and came to Australia as assissted passengers on the ' Mary Ann ' settling in Tumut New South Wales Australia. I have some details on them but would like more family history. Kind regards Anne M

 

Griffin / Mc Nally
21 Mar 1999 12:00 PM
Surnames: Griffin, McNally, Hughes, McEvoy, Branagan, Martin, McMahon, Bough, Walsh, Search, McCormick
Classification: Obituary
1-28-1912

MRS. EDWARD McNALLY

Died Early Sunday Morning After a Long Illness

Sunday morning Mrs. Edward McNally passed away at her home in this city. She was taken ill during the latter part of January. She was given the best of medical attention and she had the assistance of a trained nurse during her long and most trying illness, but it seems that death had claimed her. She retained her courage to the last, ardently hoping that she might be spared to give for a few years longer the loving, motherly attention that her family required; but such, it is evident, was not the will of Providence. She died fully fortified by all of the spiritual advantages that the fervant, confiding Christian could possess in passing from time to eternity.
The funeral was held Tuesday. There was a requiem high mass at Assumption church. Father Conway was the celebrant. The interment was in St. John's cemetery. There was a large attendance. The W.O.O.F. and the L.A. of the A.O.H. were present. The pall bearers were Bert Hughes, E.J. McEvoy, W.I.Branagan, J.R. Martin, P.F. McMahon and Peter Bough. There were a number of beautiful floral offerings, the gifts of friends and societies to which Mrs. McNally belonged.
Jane Griffin was born at Caledonia, Houston county, Minnesota, March 1, 1865. She came to Palo Alto county about thirty years ago. July 23, 1888 she was united in marriage to Edward McNally at Assumption church in this city, Rev. Daniel Murphy officiating. Mr. and Mrs. McNally subsequently made their home in Emmetsburg. The surviving members of the family are the husband, three sons and four daughters. The sons are Raymond R., Clement J., and Maurice Edward. The daughters are Elizabeth Genevieve, Mary Bernette, Veronica Kathlene and Mildred Irene. One daughter died in infancy. Her father, Maurice Griffin, who is quite aged, lives at Red Wing, Minnesota, as do also two sisters, Mrs. Richard Walsh and Mrs. Wm. Search. Another sister, Mrs. C.P. McCormick, resides at Houston, Minnesota. There are two brothers, John Griffin of Graettinger and Michael of Seattle, Washington. Mrs. McNally was a member of the W.O.O.F. the L.A. of the A.G.H., the ????????????????????????.
The death of Mrs. McNally is not only an irrepable loss to her devoted husband and seven sons and daughters, but it is keenly felt by our entire community, of which she was an acitve, worthy, and helpful member for nearly a quarter of a century. She was a lady of more than average intelligence, of keen discernment, and of true zeal for the attainment of all that is elevating and edifying in the lives of individuals as well as in the organized efforts of communities. Those who knew her intimately were fully convinced of this predominating purpose in her character. No woman in Emmetsburg understood better her responsibilities in her home and none, we are sure, gave to them closer, more far seeing or more self-sacrificing attention. That her love, care, devotion and maternal ambition had more than ordinary influence on the members her household was unmistakably manifested by them during the uncertain, slowly passing, painful hours of her last illness. To their spiritual and temporal welfare she had given the best years of her pious, thoughful, industrious, helpful life and they, in return, did everything that affection could suggest to assist her, to comfort her and to cheer her. Mrs. McNally was not only one of the most anxious, prudent, and provident of mothers, but she was a warm-hearted friend, an obliging neighbor, a practical social planner, and an exceptionally willing worker in church affairs. In fact she was never indifferent if any local activity in which she felt it her duty to make herself useful. She was always willing to undertake her part and to do it as well as her ability and time would permit. Her confidences in God's goodness, her readiness to do his holy will as best she could, and her disposition to make any sacrifice that he might require of her earned for her the high regard of those who appreciate sincere motives and enobling Christian deeds, nd they did much to make her laudable efforts successful. She was called at a comparatively early age from those whom she so fondly loved and for whom she had so anxiously and helpfully toiled. May Providence comfort and guide them, during the coming years, and lighten the burden of anguish that now weighs heavily on their tender hearts. The sympathy of all is extended to Mr. McNally, to the sons and daughters, and to the other relatives in their bereavement.


Griffin Manley

Hello from California!

Wow! The Griffin ancestors must be pulling some strings from above! My sister and I have been looking into this line since we started going through my father's papers, shortly after he passed away. They actually belonged to my Great Aunt Hortense J. White. He was busy working in Honolulu at the time and had to rush over to Los Angeles to clear out her apartment when she could no longer live on her own. At first we were disappointed because he only saved papers. Now that we have found out what they are, we are very grateful, that he had the presence of mind to do so.

Recently, we have been able to hook up with 3 other Griffin researches. One is here in California, one on the east coast in the Carolinas and the other in Notingham, England. We are trying to get something together where we share all information and perhaps accomplish more.

As for my situation, I have some of our papers and my sister has the others. I live in Northern California and she lives in the southern part of the state. We have an elderly mother that we both take care of, that lives up here, so she comes up about once a month. We also send things back and forth via email, of course. She is also on her way to visit both her daughter in Spain and then go to Ohio to help her son, daughter-in-law and new grandchild move into a house. She is able to do this with little expense, because her husband is a captain with a major airline. She has the info on the White aunts that entered ordered. I believe that nearly all of the girls that immigrated to American in the 1820's became nuns. One was fairly famous at the time for writing the first textbooks used in the US parochial schools. I have a copy of one of them about Mythology, published in 1876. It was written by C. A. White. I think she was a Catherine.

Right now we are both quite busy because my other sister, who lives in Virginia, is coming out with her family for her annual visit. We are both tied up, helping to get my mom's house ready for her visit. Then, after she is here for a week, I plan to take a week's vacation with my family while my sister is here to watch over my mom. My son is 16 and studying American History in school next year, so we are going to the east coast, especially Boston, so that he can at least get a glimpse of "the real thing".


I don't remember if I told you the exact connection that I have with the Griffins, so excuse me if I repeat. My great x 3 grandmother was Brigid (Bridget) Griffin White, Gerald's sister. She immigrated with her husband to Friendsville, Susquehanna County, Pennsylvania, about 3 years after her father and mother did, about 1823. (There is a website, by the way, for the little church the family founded there, let me know if you'd like the site).

Brigid's son, my grx2 grandfather was William Francis White. He married Frances (Fanny) Russell, also born in Ireland. She was an orphaned as a baby and adopted by her much older cousin, Stephen Russell Mallory. He was a US Senator from Florida and became Confederate Secretary of the Navy (Ironclads--CSS Virginia (Merrimack) vs the Monitor) during the Civil War. He raised Fanny in Key West, FL and Wm evidently discovered her on a business trip to the area. He married her in 1849 in Savannah, Georgia, and then headed for New York harbor (after gathering supplies) and headed off to be a merchant in the California Gold Rush. They settled in San Francisco for about 3 years and made enough money to buy a fairly large piece of property in Watsonville, Santa Cruz County and founded the church there, as well as the first frame house in the county (shipped as a "kit house" from Boston, said to be of Maine timber). The house still stands, in the middle of a huge strawberry field. It was obviously built by New Englanders who knew how to build both houses and ships.

Fanny and William's son was Stephen Mallory White, my great grandfather. He was the first native born Californian to serve in the US Senate. His major accomplishment, career-wise was fighting the Railroad tycoon, Colis Huntington and placing Los Angeles Harbor where it is today. He has a statue there and fairly recently, one of the new state-of-the-art pilot boats was named after him and Christened by my son, a great thrill for him. SM White married Hortense Sacriste (1/2 French, the other half O"Neill or O'Neal) and their son was my grandfather, William Stephen White. My dad was Stephen William Nolting White. My son is John Stephen, so you can see we've kept the name of the man who graciously took in my gg grandmother years ago.

It is said that the money from the sale of Gerald's Collegians was sent to PA to help start the family on their way here, so you can see why we hold a great debt to his generosity.

The man that I mentioned before in Nottingham thinks his connection is Daniel, Gerald's brother who wrote the bio of him. He has an inscribed book, passed down through the generations stating so. The one in California is looking for an elusive "Honora" Griffin. In his search, he has found out more about MY family than his so far, even a connection in Ireland, where someone there was wondering what happened to our branch of the family and found the Catholic Encyclopedia article, but not us. My dad was trying to do the reverse. He brought us to Ireland in 1968, but we were only able to stay a short while and the only connection we were able to find was Gerald Griffin St. in Limerick.

So how are you related? I saw the Griffin names on your list and was wondering. I take it that you live in the Clare, Limerick area?


As for me, I ended up more than 1/2 Irish, the rest being English (my mom's family left England with nearly the first colonists about 1640 for Jamestown, VA, the first permanent English settlement here. Oddly enough, they left for Religious and Political reasons as well, as they were Quakers. I also have a small amount of French and German as well. The interesting mix is my son, who is half Italian as well. Someday I just have to get him over there to actually see his heritage. This year would have been a great year, the airfares were so low, almost cheaper than going to the East Coast, but we still don't have passports and they take a while to process. My sister usually does a walking tour over there every year, but had to cancel this year due to the mad cow outbreak.. She has walked by many places with significance to the family, not knowing it until later.

No, I don't know anything about the Manley's of California. How are they related and what do you know about them so far? Supposedly, more Griffins made it to California than I released. Some are supposedly buried in the closest Mission Cemetery at San Juan Bautista. I just found this out and have not had the time to drive down there and check it out. It's only about a half an hour or so from here, so I plan to pop down there as soon as I have the chance to see what I can find. We did have mention of it in the family letters, but didn't know that they stayed in California and were buried so close. I have been to the mission more than a few time and wasn't aware of it. I always take visitors there because it is right on the San Andreas earthquake fault and is quite impressive, especially for those not used to earthquakes.

Let me know what, if anything you do know about the Manleys and I will attempt to see if I can add anything to it.

I don't know if the talent is inherited or not, but my son seems to be a natural at poetry. He's even been able to write poems for his French class. They just pop out without much effort at all. I was never good at it, so it has me baffled. My grandfather's brother, Gerald Griffin White, also seemed to have quite a talent. We have found stacks of his that were evidently read on major San Francisco and Los Angeles radio stations in the 1930's.

Must go. I have to pack early for the trip so that my nephew can spend the week with us when he comes. He's the same age as my son and the cousins only get to see each other once a year. My son is an only child, so they are like brothers.

Nice hearing from you. I really enjoyed your website, by the way. We are trying to get one up at this end. My son knows how to design them but we are in the process of upgrading our system. My husband is a systems operator for the county. We live in Silicon Valley, by the way, which explains why we even have a system at all. I'm aiming for an iBook, so that I can go off into my corner and not be disturbed while I'm doing my genealogy. The word I dread from the office is "OOPS!" The two are constantly upgrading everything and occasionally there's a BIG mistake. Of course they always blame it on the machine.

Thanks for getting in touch!

Lindalouise White De Mattei

 

Sr Mary Ita O Sullivan
She is gone, that gentle Sister ,
Kindly ,gracious, blest,
Gone to the Heart of Jesus,
Sweet home of peace and rest.

Like him in far off Nazareth.
The hidden life she led,
She walked the lowly ways of earth
But angels knew her tread.

Like him was pain her portion ,
Like him she bore the cross
Even to Calvarys summit ,
There learned the gain of loss .

At length the roseate tinted clouds
Athwart the Eastern way
Proclaimed the glad approach of dawn ,
The dawn of the Perfect Day .

And now in spheres celestial
Her soul by love possessed
Will know the deep , ecstatic joy
Of Mary and the Blest .


Bishop Brendan O'Brien asked me to send you this information about Bishop Windle.
We are not really sure of Bishop Windle's ancestry but this may help you.
Most Reverend Joseph Raymond Windle
Joseph Raymond Windle was born in Ashdad, Ontario, Canada, August 28, 1917; the son of James Windle and Bridget Scollard.
After completion of his studies at Calabogie High School in 1936, he studied Philosophy at the Classical College of St. Alexandre, Limbour, Quebec. Between 1939 and 1943 he pursued theological studies at the Grand Seminary of Montreal. He was ordained to the priesthood in his home parish, Most Precious Blood, Calabogie, Ontario, Canada, on May 16, 1943
Following his ordination, he was assistant in Mattawa for seven years. In 1950, he pursued post graduate studies in Canon Law in Rome at the Lateran University, and on his return to Canada, he served as Secretary to Bishop Smith and Vice Chancellor. He was then appointed assistant at Temiscaming, where he served from 1954 to 1957.
In 1957 he became part time assistant at Campbell's Bay, Quebec and served on the Regional Matrimonal Tribunal of the Archdiocese of Ottawa, Ontario. He was named Parish Priest of Campbell's Bay in 1958 and continued his work in Ottawa at the same time.
On November 15, 1960, he was named Auxiliary Bishop of Ottawa. His Episcopal Ordination took place in Notre Dame Basilica, Ottawa, Ontario, on January 19, 1961. Bishop Windle remained Auxiliary Bishop of Ottawa and Pastor of St. Patrick's Parish for eight years.
On January 25, 1969, he was named Coadjutor Bishop of Pembroke with the right of succession and became Bishop of Pembroke in February 1971.
Pope John Paul II accepted Bishop Windle's resignation as Bishop of Pembroke on May 5, 1993.
Bishop Windle died suddenly on September 24, 1997.
Hope this is helpful
Sr. Marie for
Bishop Brenday O'Brien


Post Card Old Data
Key Words
Brooklyn 1906 Miss B M Hayes Fairy St.
Miss Hurley Presbytery Bulgaden 1906 . Athea , Pat , Sheehy.
Portland Ml ? Longfellow ?
Miss Blake School House Ardleigh, Colchester [Venesia Farrovia]
Pittsburgh Pa, The Point By Night .
Miss Lucy Magrane ? Loretto Abbey Rome , Farrovia 1925.
Fr J M ? sent card from Rome.
Liverpool Card to Miss Moya O Neil 2 Jocelyn Place from Rita 1931.
Student Margarita Moloney Loretto Abbey.
Miss Bridie Hayes Fairy St . 1931 B Dalton Posted Limerick.
Miss M Moloney from Violet 16-4-1903.
1902 Card from May Carroll ?.
Remember 24th June 1903 from Violet.
Mr J Walsh RIC ? Athea Jan 1927.
Miss Hurley Mountain View Hotel Lisdoonvarna 1906.
D W Hurley Merchant Athea.
9th Regimental Armoury 14th St NY near 6th Ave Brooklyn Stamp , Mr J M Hayes Fairy St 1906 [ M Greany].
Miss Nora Guiney Knockavinna London Card Half Penny Stamp , Xmas .For D W Hurley [Cupid] .
Mary Mc Elligott ,Ellen Cullen, Sr. Dolores,Rathfarnham From Sheffield to Mgt Moloney.
Miss K O Connor Athea 1907 .
Chicago 1907 to Miss B W Hurley Athea.
Agnes Mc Gill to Mgt Moloney from Toronto 14-12- 1905 Jarvis St,
Coborg Canada Abbey St Card . P Roche there for 6yrs ,Dear Friend Denis Moloney,Abbeyfeale . Old Card.
Lucy writes to Miss M Moloney.
Miss Kelly Publican Athea 1905 from Mary A Casey.
Mr James N Cotter Knockbrack Knocknagoshel . From N Healy wanted to talk about work in ?.
From Evelyn to Loretto Abbey.
Mountain View Hotel , Ballybunion Post Mark 1906 to M Hurley.
Card from J O B ? Xmas England going to Paris to Mgt Moloney [old card[
Miss ? Kitty Healy Ballygrennan 1920 ?. Wishing Dearest Kate a Happy Xmas.
Harriet ? Love to Mrs Barrett ? The Sq. Listowel.
Miss Moloney Clare View Lodge Ballybunion.
Miss H Cleary ? @ Mrs Mc Donnell Bulgaden.
Mrs A F Keeffe 596 Wartington St Springfield,1910. Would you like a bunch of Shamrocks Mother.
Marie a Listowel friend has collected 450 Post Cards . c1904.
Brooklyn Card to Mr James Moran Gortnagross 1906.
Directory Dr T L Moloney Ballarat 1867-70.
26 Wood Grimsley Mrs A Bevan ?Cross Roads Ditchingham ? NR Norfolk .
Death of Miss Smith from Jim.
Maggie Mc Coy of Cortland NY wrote to Miss B Hurley.
Miss K O Connor Athea . Paddy talks of Marriage to Earl c1906.
Miss Mollie Kenny Kenny Lodge Ballybunion 1916. SS Peter + Paul Church . Wolverhampton Card.
Rev John B Moloney CC The West Inn Abbeyfeale.
South Leigh Brighton 1905 to Miss Moloney Abbeyfeale from Maya ?
Master F O Donnell The Cottage Kiladysert.
Her Dearest from Berlin to Mgt Moloney.
Maggie Moloy ? Cortland NY to Bridge . Principal School there.
Miss Mary Jo Liston Athea from Mary Scannell Abbeyfeale.
San Francisco P Hurley to D W Hurley.Note Pat J Hurley returned Home died1943 Buried Killahenny with his Wife Mc Enery.
Leytonstone Posted Cousin Tommie to Miss Hurley at Lisdoonvarna.
Pittsburgh PA For Mary T Moloney Church St.
Master Joe Moloney Hope your hand is well again St Vincent's Limerick.
Jose Liston Athea Village 1912 Jim.
Miss J W Booth @ Mr B White Glenagore Athea 1906. Post Mark Leytonstone from Kitty.
7.30 March 7th 1905 Card.
D W Hurley Card from San Francisco 19??.
Pat in San Francisco , J B coming home after 12yrs.
From Maggie Mc Coy to Miss B Hurley 1907. Mamaroneck NY Post Mark.
Joe Fitzgibbons Chicago to Miss B Hurley Athea 1906.
Card from Freiburg to Miss M Moloney 1905.
Ellie Fitzpatrick Upper Knockbrack Knocknagoshel .
John Mc Grath Athea got card from Chicago with Picture of Union Station Yard From Joe.
Mrs Joe Corridan Main St Listowel 1913 post from Kilmallock.
Sr. Assumpta Hurley Professed Ennis 1943.
Wm. Moloney a Limerick Man Won Irish and Greek Medals in Inter Cert. Exam 1901.
KEP list 14th Oct 1841 John Moloney Duagh had Duagh Meadow.
Matt Moloney had Duagh Meadow also called Carrolls Meadow.

 

Victoria Cross Est. 1856.
Some Winners
P. Mullane, Action 27th July 1880.
J. Connors, born Duagh 1830. Action Crimea 8th Sept. 1855 .
W. E. Costelloe Died Sussex 7th June 1949.
W. Coffey action Crimea 29-3-1885.
W. Shelton Agar action Russia 17 June 1919.
J. W. Adams action Afghanistan 11-12-1879.
P. Grant India 16 Nov. 1857.
R. Clare Hart action Afghanistan 31-1-1879.
R. Kelliher Tralee action New Guinea 13Sept. 1943.
W. Keneally Wexford action Gallipoli 25-4-1915.
H.E. Kenny action France 25Sept. 1915.
P. Mahony action India 21st Sept.1857.
H.G. Moore action S. Africa 29-12-1877.
W. Nash Newcastlewest action India 11-3-1858.
M.J. O Rourke action France Aug. 1917.
C.Raymond action Burma 21-3-1945.
J. Weir Foote action Dieppe 19 Aug. 1942.
Fr D. Kelliher Military Cross April 1944.
J. Danaher action S. Africa 16-1-1881.
J. Cunningham action France 12-4-1917.
Sir O Moore Creagh action Kabul River 22-4-1879.

W .Keneally 1915 Gallipoli. Of Wexford.
Fr Dan Kelliher Military Cross 1944.

 

Surname First Name Reb Ship Tried Trial Place Term DOB Native Place DOD Death Place Remarks
Downes Thomas Hadlow (2) [1820] 1819 Clare Life 1782 Co Limerick Labourer
Doyle Nicholas Earl St Vincent (1) [1818] 1817 Co Limerick 7 1778 Rathkeale Co Limerick Labourer
Driscoll Florence Minerva (1800) 1798 Limerick 7 1776 Limerick Labourer Turner
Dunden Thomas Pilot (1817) 1816 Co Limerick 7 1796 Friarstown Co Limerick Labourer
Dwyer Cornelius R Atlas II (1802) 1801 Limerick Life 1766 Limerick 1866 Campbelltown
Dwyer John R Atlas II (1802) 1801 Limerick Life 1776 Limerick 1844 Appin Quarryman
Edwards John Earl St Vincent (1) [1818] 1818 Cork City 7 1797 Limerick Servant
Fahily Andrew Tyne (1819) 1817 Limerick City 7 1797 Limerick City Victualler Labourer
Fehany Timothy Earl St Vincent (1) [1818] 1818 Co Limerick Life 1788 Co Limerick Labourer
Fitzgerald John Earl St Vincent (1) [1818] 1818 Tipperary 7 Co Limerick Flax & Hemp Dresser Quarry Blaster
Fitzgerald William Minerva (1800) 1798 Limerick Life 1777 Limerick Tobaconist
Fitzgerald William R Minerva (1800) 1800 Kilkenny Life 1777 Limerick City Tobacconist
Fitzgibbon Patrick Chapman (1) [1817] 1816 Co Limerick 7 1785 Co Limerick Labourer
Fitzpatrick James Atlas III (1816) 1815 St John's Canada Life 1783 Limerick Labourer
Fitzpatrick Thomas Canada (3) [1815] 1814 Dublin City 7 1793 Co Limerick Servant
Flanagan James Earl St Vincent (1) [1818] 1817 Co Limerick 7 1778 Co Limerick Teacher
Flanigan Thomas Hadlow (2) [1820] 1819 Co Limerick Life 1796 Limerick City Labourer
Flynn Jeremiah Hadlow (2) [1820] 1818 Co Limerick Life 1794 Co Limerick Stable Man
Flynn John Canada (3) [1815] 1814 Dublin City 7 1796 Co Limerick Groom
Glenney John Hadlow (2) [1820] 1819 Limerick City 7 1800 Limerick City Labourer
Gorman John Three Bees (1814) 1813 Co Limerick Life 1779 Limerick Quarryman
Gorman John Daphne (1819) 1819 Co Cork Life 1785 Co Limerick Soldier Labourer
Grady Henry Minerva (1800) 1798 Limerick Life 1780 Limerick Labourer Cooper
Haley Dennis Atlas III (1816) 1815 Wiltshire Gaol Delivery 14 1793 Limerick Soldier
Halpin James Tyne (1819) 1818 Limerick City 7 1784 Limerick City Labourer
Healy Charles Earl St Vincent (1) [1818] 1818 Tipperary 7 1778 Co Limerick Labourer
Healy Joseph Daphne (1819) 1819 Kings Co 7 1791 Limerick Woollen Weaver
Hefferan Stephen Minerva I (2) [1819] 1818 Co Tipperary 7 1791 Limerick Labourer
Higgins Thomas Surrey I (2) [1816] 1815 Co Limerick 7 1791 Limerick Labourer
Hogan John Guildford (3) [1818] 1817 Limerick 7 1789 Co Limerick Labourer
Hogan Thomas Guildford (2) [1816] 1815 Limerick City Life 1789 Limerick Stonemason
Hogan Thomas Earl St Vincent (1) [1818] 1817 Co Limerick 7 1778 Co Limerick Labourer
Holmes Robert Hadlow (2) [1820] 1819 Limerick City Life 1797 Kilmallock Co Limerick Farmers Servant
Jordon Miles Earl St Vincent (1) [1818] 1817 Co Limerick 7 1799 Co Limerick Apprentice Horse Shoer
Kelly Edmund Earl St Vincent (1) [1818] 1818 Co Limerick 7 1791 Bruff Co Limerick Labourer
Kelly John Three Bees (1814) 1812 Co Clare 7 1744 Limerick Peddler
Kelly William Canada (5) [1819] 1818 Guines France Court Martial 7 1796 Limerick Soldier Seaman
Kiernane Michael Guildford (2) [1816] 1815 Limerick City 7 1765 Limerick Labourer
Landers James Hadlow (2) [1820] 1818 Co Limerick Life 1773 Co Limerick Labourer
Landers Michael Hadlow (2) [1820] 1819 Co Limerick Life 1887 Limerick City Labourer

 

 

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Your search returned 154 records
Displaying records 1 to 40
Surname First Name Reb Ship Tried Trial Place Term DOB Native Place DOD Death Place Remarks
Barrett James Earl St Vincent (1) [1818] 1818 Kerry 7 1792 Co Limerick Labourer
Begley Michael Earl St Vincent (1) [1818] 1818 Co Limerick 7 1784 Co Limerick Bagpiper
Bourke Patrick Hadlow (2) [1820] 1819 Limerick City 7 1801 Limerick City Shoemaker
Brandon Thomas Tyne (1819) 1818 Limerick City 7 1796 Limerick City Slater Plasterer
Brodrick Daniel Ocean II (1) [1818] 1817 Kent Assizes 14 1787 Co Limerick Labourer
Brown David Isabella I (1) [1818] 1817 Norfolk QS 7 1792 Limerick Seaman
Brown Edward Indefatigable (2) [1815] 1813 Chatham Court Martial 7 1783 Limerick Joiner Carpenter
Bryan James Larkins (1) [1817] 1817 Kent (Canterbury) QS Life 1794 Co Limerick Labourer
Burke Michael Mariner (1) [1816] 1815 Kent QS Canterbury Life 1790 Co Limerick Soldier Labourer
Burke William Larkins (1) [1817] 1817 Southampton QS 7 1795 Limerick Soldier Servant
Byrne Michael Agamemnon (1820) 1820 Middlesex Gaol Delivery 7 1767 Co Limerick Labourer
Callaghan James Surrey I (2) [1816] 1816 Co Kilkenny 7 1767 Limerick Dealer Labourer
Carey Denis Tyne (1819) 1818 Co Cork 7 1793 Co Limerick Labourer
Carmody Michael Tyne (1819) 1818 Limerick City 7 1796 Limerick City Baker
Carroll Edmund Earl St Vincent (1) [1818] 1818 Co Limerick 7 1788 Bruff Co Limerick Labourer
Casey Connor Pilot (1817) 1816 Co Limerick 7 1779 Limerick Labourer
Clanchy James Hadlow (2) [1820] 1819 Limerick City 7 1790 Limerick City Labourer
Clancy Cornelius Three Bees (1814) 1813 Co Cork Life 1793 Limerick Quarryman
Clancy John Tyne (1819) 1817 Limerick City 7 1768 Limerick City Assistant Surgeon
Clogan James Earl St Vincent (1) [1818] 1817 Co Limerick 7 1793 Co Limerick Labourer
Cockerry Timothy Earl St Vincent (1) [1818] 1818 Co Limerick 7 1784 Co Limerick Labourer
Collins Maurice Hadlow (2) [1820] 1819 Co Limerick Life 1760 Co Limerick Labourer
Condon James Guildford (2) [1816] 1815 Co Limerick 7 1770 Limerick Farmer
Connor Charles Martha (1818) 1817 Kings Co 7 1780 Limerick City Indoor Servant
Connors Denis Hadlow (2) [1820] 1819 Co Limerick Life 1798 Co Limerick Tobacco Spinner
Conway Patrick Sir William Bensley (1817) 1815 Middlesex Gaol Delivery 7 1782 Limerick Labourer
Conway Thomas Earl St Vincent (1) [1818] 1818 Co Kilkenny 7 1783 Co Limerick Labourer
Cooke Nicholas Hadlow (2) [1820] 1819 Co Limerick Life 1790 Co Limerick Labourer
Cooney Michael Hadlow (2) [1820] 1818 Limerick City Life 1775 Limerick City Labourer
Cronin Michael Tyne (1819) 1818 Co Dublin 7 1796 Limerick 1832 Moreton Bay QLD House Painter Paper Stainer Colonial sentence
Curtin William Guildford (2) [1816] 1815 Co Limerick Life 1791 Co Limerick Labourer
Curtin William Hadlow (2) [1820] 1819 Co Limerick Life 1794 Co Limerick Labourer
Daly Daniel Chapman (1) [1817] 1816 Co Limerick 7 1785 Limerick Groom's Clerk
Daly John Surrey I (2) [1816] 1815 Co Limerick 7 1776 Limerick Labourer
Darcy George Pilot (1817) 1816 Co Kerry 7 1783 Limerick Sailor Labourer
Day James Hadlow (2) [1820] 1819 Co Limerick Life 1796 Co Limerick Labourer
Dillon Thomas R Minerva (1800) 1798 Limerick 7 1774 Limerick 1818 Parramatta Labourer Carpenter
Donagher John Baring (1) [1815] 1814 Montreal Court Martial Life 1789 Limerick Labourer
Donahoe Edward Chapman (1) [1817] 1816 Co Tyrone 7 1793 Limerick City Seaman
Downes Patrick Tyne (1819) 1817 Limerick City 7 1771 Limerick City Labourer

 

 

New Search Back to Convicts Page Home Email Peter
Your search returned 154 records
Displaying records 81 to 120
Surname First Name Reb Ship Tried Trial Place Term DOB Native Place DOD Death Place Remarks
Lynch James Guildford (3) [1818] 1817 Limerick 7 1782 Co Limerick Horse Shoer Blacksmith
Maloney James Hadlow (2) [1820] 1818 Co Limerick 7 1800 Co Limerick Labourer
Mangin Thomas Canada (3) [1815] 1814 Co Cork 7 1758 Limerick Attorney Clerk
Marooney Henry Dorothy (1820) 1820 Dublin City 14 1794 Limerick City Solicitor's Clerk
Massey Hugh Three Bees (1814) 1813 Cork City 7 1766 Limerick Servant
McAllister Thomas Three Bees (1814) 1813 Co Cork 7 1754 Limerick Soldier
McCarthy Daniel Hadlow (2) [1820] 1819 Co Limerick Life 1786 Co Limerick Labourer
McCarthy John Mangles (1) [1820] 1819 Barbados Court Martial Life 1795 Limerick Soldier Labourer
McDonnell Mathew Earl St Vincent (1) [1818] 1818 Co Limerick Life 1794 Rathkeale Co Limerick Tallow Chandler Soapboiler
McElligott Thomas Hadlow (2) [1820] 1819 Co Limerick Life 1785 Limerick City Merchants Clerk
McGeary William Surrey I (1) [1814] 1813 Lisbon Court Martial Life 1789 Limerick Gunner Engineer
McMahon Bryan Atlas III (1816) 1815 St John's Canada Life 1791 Limerick Labourer
McMahon Francis Minerva (1800) 1798 Limerick 7 1759 Limerick Labourer
McMahon Michael Guildford (2) [1816] 1815 Co Limerick 7 1785 Limerick Farmer
McNamara Denis Hadlow (2) [1820] 1819 Limerick City 7 1787 Co Limerick Labourer
McNamara Michael Shipley (1) [1817] 1815 Upper Canada Court Martial Life 1788 Co Limerick Labourer
McNamara Thady Hadlow (2) [1820] 1819 Limerick City 7 1799 Limerick City Labourer
Meara Bryan Canada (3) [1815] 1814 Co Limerick 7 1781 Limerick Labourer
Moloney William Earl St Vincent (1) [1818] 1817 Tipperary 7 1778 Co Limerick Setter & Cutter Stonemason
Mooney John Lady Castlereagh (1818) 1816 Middlesex Gaol Delivery 7 1794 Limerick Plasterer
Mooney Maurice Mary I (1819) 1818 Cork City 7 1802 Limerick City Labourer
Murphy Patrick Three Bees (1814) 1813 Co Limerick 7 1787 Limerick Quarryman
Murphy Patrick Ocean I (1816) 1814 Palermo Court Martial Life 1788 Limerick Soldier Tailor
Murphy William Minerva I (2) [1819] 1819 Waterford City 7 1800 Limerick Seaman
Neagle John Hadlow (2) [1820] 1819 Clare Life 1800 Limerick Stable Servant
Neil Patrick Eliza I (1) [1820] 1819 Middlesex Gaol Delivery 7 1791 Co Limerick Labourer
Neil Simon Hadlow (2) [1820] 1819 Limerick City 7 1785 Limerick Labourer
Nelson Jane Mary Anne I (1) [1816] 1815 Middlesex Gaol Delivery 7 1795 Limerick Servant
Nolan William Minerva (1800) 1797 Life 1773 Limerick Labourer Servant
Noonan David Three Bees (1814) 1813 Co Limerick 7 1791 Limerick Quarryman
Noonan John Hadlow (2) [1820] 1819 Clare Life 1765 Co Limerick Labourer
O'Brien Daniel Hadlow (2) [1820] 1819 Limerick City 7 1790 Limerick City Coachman
O'Donnell Michael Guildford (3) [1818] 1817 Limerick 7 1789 Co Limerick Horse shoer Blacksmith
O'Donnell Patrick Guildford (2) [1816] 1815 Co Limerick 7 1794 Limerick Gardener
O'Meara Thomas Bencoolen (1819) 1818 Dublin City 7 1784 Limerick Soldier Colonial Sentence for Life in 1826
Quane Patrick Three Bees (1814) 1813 Cork City 7 1782 Limerick Labourer
Ready Edmund Earl St Vincent (1) [1818] 1818 Co Limerick 7 1783 Bruff Co Limerick Labourer
Ready John Three Bees (1814) 1812 Co Tipperary 14 1784 Limerick Gardener Labourer
Ready Thomas Earl St Vincent (1) [1818] 1817 Co Limerick Life 1768 Limerick Bullock Driver Carter
Reddy John Minerva I (2) [1819] 1819 Co Tipperary 7 1786 Rathkeale Co Limerick Labourer


Your search returned 154 records
Displaying records 121 to 154
Surname First Name Reb Ship Tried Trial Place Term DOB Native Place DOD Death Place Remarks
Reidy Daniel Hadlow (2) [1820] 1819 Clare Life 1790 Limerick Labourer
Reilly Thomas Guildford (3) [1818] 1817 Limerick 7 1795 Co Limerick Labourer
Reynolds Maurice Dorothy (1820) 1820 Cork City 7 1798 Co Limerick Labourer
Rice Eleanor Northampton (1815) 1814 Middlesex Gaol Delivery 7 1787 Limerick Servant
Riordan Callaghan Guildford (2) [1816] 1815 Co Limerick 7 1786 Limerick Farmer
Roache Maurice Guildford (2) [1816] 1815 Co Limerick 7 1785 Limerick Farmer
Ryan Denis Surrey I (2) [1816] 1815 Co Limerick 7 1784 Limerick Labourer
Ryan James Mangles (1) [1820] 1819 Middlesex Gaol Delivery 7 1773 Limerick Seaman
Ryan John Hadlow (2) [1820] 1819 Co Limerick Life 1785 Limerick City Labourer
Ryan John Hadlow (2) [1820] 1819 Limerick City 7 1780 Co Limerick Butler Servant
Ryan Margaret Northampton (1815) 1814 Middlesex Gaol Delivery 7 1792 Limerick Servant
Ryan Martin Tyne (1819) 1818 Co Dublin Life 1780 Gormanstown Cos Kildare Meath Limerick Tipperary Westmeath Wicklow Labourer
Ryan Mary Francis & Eliza (1815) 1813 Kilkenny City 7 1789 Limerick Servant
Sage Henry Hadlow (2) [1820] 1819 Limerick City 7 1787 Limerick City Butler Servant
Scott Patrick Pilot (1817) 1816 Co Limerick 7 1797 Friarstown Co Limerick Labourer
Shea Patrick Guildford (3) [1818] 1817 Co Cork 7 1787 Co Limerick Farmer Labourer
Sheahan Darby Earl St Vincent (1) [1818] 1817 Co Limerick 7 1783 Co Limerick Labourer
Sheedy Michael Earl St Vincent (1) [1818] 1817 Co Limerick 7 1794 Co Limerick 1865 Middle Harbour Sydney Labourer
Smith John Earl St Vincent (2) [1820] 1819 Stafford QS 7 1792 Co Limerick Footman
Smith William Hadlow (2) [1820] 1819 Limerick City 7 1794 Limerick City Soldier Servant
Stanton James Indefatigable (2) [1815] 1814 Chester Sess Life 1769 Limerick Labourer
Sullivan John Surrey I (2) [1816] 1815 Co Limerick 7 1792 Limerick Labourer
Supple Patrick Tyne (1819) 1817 Limerick City 7 1796 Limerick City Butcher
Thorpe Mary Francis & Eliza (1815) 1814 Dublin City 7 1785 Limerick Servant
Toomey John Pilot (1817) 1816 Co Limerick 7 1797 Limerick Labourer
Wall James Hadlow (2) [1820] 1819 Limerick City 7 1797 Co Limerick Labourer
Wall Timothy Hadlow (2) [1820] 1819 Limerick City 7 1800 Co Limerick Labourer
Walsh James Canada (3) [1815] 1814 Co Cork 7 1765 Limerick Labourer
Walsh William Guildford (2) [1816] 1815 Limerick City Life 1794 Co Limerick Labourer
Webb Henry Hadlow (2) [1820] 1819 Co Limerick 7 1791 Limerick City Labourer
Whelan Patrick Three Bees (1814) 1813 Co Limerick Life 1788 Limerick Labourer
White John Hadlow (2) [1820] 1819 Clare Life Co Limerick
Wholahan Cornelius Pilot (1817) 1816 Co Limerick 7 1794 Friarstown Co Limerick Labourer
Wise John Minerva I (2) [1819] 1819 Cork City 7 1799 Co Limerick Groom