OLD PAPERS

Welsh Papers

 

 [No title] The house of William Fealy, bog ranger to Mr Sandes, J.P., at Keald, near Listowel, was burned to the ground at an early hour on Wednesday morning.…

  South Wales Echo (Special edition) 3rd September 1885  News  p.3  28 words

 

 

 

http://newspapers.library.wales/view/3441229

 

OLD PAPERS

 

IRISH USA

 

 

Note Upton a West Limerick name

http://query.nytimes.com/mem/archive-free/pdf?res=9502E2DF1E3BE03ABC4F52DFB467838C609EDE

17 ENGINEERS LOST IN BATTLE; Americans Killed or Captured on Day They Voluntarily Helped the British. 'FIGHTING COP' AMONG THEM Frank Upton Was a New York Policeman--Several Others from This City. DEATHS. MISSING. WOUNDED. 17 ENGINEERS KILLED OR TAKEN IN FRANCE

 

Special to The New York Times. ();

December 17, 1917,

, Section , Page 1, Column , words

 

WASHINGTON, Dec. 16.-1917-General Pershing today sent to the War Department a casualty list in which appeared the names of seventeen American army engineers recorded as missing as a result of the action of Nov. 30 1917 .






 

http://www.celticcousins.net/irishiniowa/irishsocieties.htm

 

 

The Glories of Ireland; Edited by Joseph Dunn & P.J. Lennox; Phoenix

Limited; Washington, D.C.: 1914

 

Famous Irish Societies

By John O'Dea

National Historian, A.O.H.

 

The temperance movement among Catholics was, from the visit of Father

Mathew in 1849, largely Irish. The societies first formed were united by no

bond until 1871, when the Connecticut societies formed a State Union. Other

states formed unions and a national convention in Baltimore in 1872 created

a National Union. In 1878 there were 90,000 priests, laymen, women, and

children in the Catholic Total Abstinence Benevolent Union. In 1883 the

Union was introduced into Canada, and in 1895 there were 150,000 members on

the American continent. From the C.T.A.B.U. were formed the Knights of

Father Mathew, a total abstinence and semi-military body, first instituted

in St. Louis in 1872.

 

Bishop Cusack Dead.

The Sacred Heart Review, Volume 59, Number 29, 20 July 1918

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Rt. Rey. Thomas F. Cusack, D. D., fifth Bishop of Albany, died on the 12th inst. Bishop Cusack was born in New York City on Feb. 22, 1862. He was a son of James Cusack and Honora Boland. He graduated from the College of Saint Francis Xavier, New York, in 1880 and studied for the priesthood in Troy Seminary. He was ordained on May 30, 1885. Father Cusack served as superior of the New York Apostolate, the diocesan missionary society, from 1907 to 1904. He was consecrated Titular Bishop of Themiscyra and Auxiliary Bishop of New York on April 25, 1904, in Saint Patrick's Cathedral and on July 5, 1915, was transferred to the See of Albany.

 

 

 

http://www.celticcousins.net/irishiniowa/irishnews1.htm

 

 

Davenport, Scott Co, IA

Oct 19, 1843

 

IRISH WIDOWS

 

At Drogheda, the beggars besieged us in a way which, though embarrassing to

a young lady, was quite amusing to the other passengers. In handing this

lady into the coach after dinner, a woman approached us saying, 'your honor

will sure give something to a poor starving widow for the sake of the sweet

lady that owns you.' To get rid of this mode of attack, I gave her a penny.

This encouraged another, who exclaimed, 'your honor's a happy man, with such

a beautiful lady by your side. Don't forget a poor creature with eight

starving childer's.' She got her penny and departed only to give place to a

third, who began, 'Long life to your honor and your honor's beautiful lady.

May you find the sweet little ones quite well when you get home.' This one

gave place to another, who commenced, ' God bless your honor and long life

to your honor's jewel of a lady. It was a lucky day she made choice of your

honro, who is so good to the poor widows.' This, to use a cant phrase, was

'coming it too strong,' and the lady exclaimed, "Go away, you jade; I am not

married at all.' But, nothing daunted, the hag continued, 'Well, if not

married already, its soon you will be, for you're too good and sweet a lady

to let his honor be breaking his heart for you.' My small coin was

exhausted, and rather than stand such fire the lady gave the 'jade' a penny

herself, when we were spared further annoyance by the guard's 'all right' to

the coachman, the crack of whose whip dashed the hopes of half a score of

other 'widows' who were gathering for the onset.--Weed's Letters.

 

 

 

 

The Gazette

Davenport, Scott, Iowa

Dec 21, 1847

 

Ireland

State of the Provinces.- After a period of unexampled tranquility, the old

system of Agrarian crime is again spreading through the Southern Provinces.

The Limerick Clare, and Tipperary outrages on person and property are

becoming events of daily occurrence, and complaints are general of the

cessation of all employment, by reason of the termination of all harvest

labor, it is apprehended that this in conjunction with many other

circumstances, will lead to a season of more than average disquiet.

 

It gives us much satisfaction to state that an order has been received from

Goverment for the discharge of the American brig islam from the restraint

placed upon her last week. This was but an act of justice toward a people

who have done so much for the relief of Irish distress and the promptitude

with which the authorities have responded to the wishes of the inhabitants

reflects credit upon them. The joy-bells rung a merry peal in honor of the

occasion.--Galway Mercury.

 

 

 

http://www.celticcousins.net/irishiniowa/infowanted.htm

 

5 Oct 1850

Of MICHAEL CRONIN, native of Ballingarry, co. Limerick, late of

Tomengate, city of Limerick - son to James Cronin and Norry Wall, - he is about 15 years of age and left Ireland about 4 months since. Any information respecting him will be thankfully received by his uncle, David Wall, care of Michael Otis Sullivan, Sullivan Post Office, Jackson County, Iowa.

 

10 May 1856

Of CORNELIUS NOLAN, of parish Ashford, co Limerick, who came to this country 10 years since, and was last heard from in Indiana, along the Wabash, where his brother John died. Information received by his brothers Patrick and Batt, Iowa City, Ia.

 

6 June 1857

Of DENIS FITSGERALD, a native of parish Abbeyfeale [co. Limerick], aged about 26 years, and fair-haired, who landed in Boston in August, 1849; when last heard from was in the Columbia College, Washington, D C. Information received by his brother David, Union Prairie P O, Alamacee county, Iowa.

 

 

Of EDMOND and JOHN NAUGHTIN, natives of Newcastle West [co. Limerick]; when last heard from were in New York 2 years ago last October. Please address their sister Catherine, Keokuk, Iowa.

 

19 Dec 1857

Of THOMAS O'CONNELL, of parish Glin [co. Limerick]; when last heard from (in the summer of 1855), was in Davenport, Scott county, Iowa. Please address his brother John, Genoa, Cayuga county, New York.

26 Dec 1857

Of THOMAS O'CONNELL, of parish Glin [co. Limerick]; when last heard from (in the summer of 1855), was in Davenport, Scott county, Iowa. Please address his brother John, Genoa, Cayuga county, New York.

 

 

 

Of JOHN MALONEY, a native of Newcastlewest [co. Limerick], who was in Dubuque, Iowa, in the fall of 1855, and went from there towards St Paul, Minnesota. Information received by his brother Michael, care of J O'Hea Cantillon, Dubuque, Iowa.

 

Of THOMAS HASTEN, who left Megregories, Iowa, from his wife and boy. He came, 15 years ago [sic], from the parish of Balysteen, county Limerick. He is about 46 or 50 years of age. His wife has been very uneasy about him; and also her son, Patrick, who has been in bad health. He started for New Orleans. The man who claims the lot is living in town, and if you are not here before the 1st of April, his wife is to be put out, by his paying her for what it cost, and if he is at home at that time he can keep it.

 

6 Mar 1858

Of RICHARD MALONEY, who sailed from Limerick, March, 1857; when last heard from was in Muscatine, Iowa. Direct to John Maloney, Egypt, Monro county, New York.

 

Of MARY FITZGERALD, a native of Balleyronen, parish Balleyhigue [co. Kerry], who sailed in the ship Lady Russell from Tralee, on the 18th of September, 1857, and landed in New York on the 21st of October. Information received by her husband, John Haragon, Muscatine, Iowa.

 

 

OLD AGE: 24 May 1875 Daily Alta California

http://cdnc.ucr.edu/cgi-bin/cdnc?a=d&d=DAC18750524.2.30&srpos=13&e=-------en--20--1--txt-txIN-listowel-----#

 

The veteran patriot, James Kissane, of Moybella, has Just passed away, having attained the extraordinary age of 111 years. During the late Kerry election this old gentleman walked in from his residence to the polling booth at Listowel, a distance of five miles, and record a his vote in favour of the Home-Rule candidate. Besides this daring offender, old Houlihan of Ballydonoghue." and Mrs. Benson, of Listowel, have, it appears, just paid the debt of nature at the age of 104 and 109 years, while Listowel is still enlivened by the presence of old Nancy Trent of Ennismore," who, at the age of 103, walks eight miles to church every Sunday,

 

 

 

San Francisco Call, Volume 94, Number 42, 12 July 1903

The Rev. E. P. Dempsey, assistant vicar general of St. Mary's Cathedral, left Friday morning for an extended tour of Europe. He will visit Rome, Paris and London. He will also spend several weeks visiting his sister. Mrs. Thomas Galvan, at Listowel County. Kerry, Ireland. On his return to this continent he will make a tour of Mexico before returning to this city. He expects to be back in San Francisco in December. 1903.

 

 

San Francisco Call, Volume 73, Number 135, 14 April 1893

Another Missing Man. Mayor Ellert has received a latter dated William street, Listowel, Ireland, March 27, 1893 from M. W. Mulville, C. E., a relative of Patrick Melville or Mulvllle or Mulvihlll. who was in San Francisco In 1870, 1871, 1872, asking for information of his whereabouts. Mulvihill was then 5 feet 10 inches high, 24 years old, and had received a classical education. He was a clerk in the Federal War Department during the civil war. He had many friends In San Francisco, among whom was CD. Stanton, agent of the Boston Financier and Operator. The missing man was In Los Angeles in December, 1872.

 

 

JOHN R Rice MD 1864 adv.

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JOHN R. RICE. li. A. sand JI. D. Trinity « oltrcrr. Uabllai. SUR3EOS. Royal College of Surgeons, England. ACCOUCHEUB, Royal Lying-in Hospital Rotunda. Duhlin. Registered No. 6W7. Act XX and XXL Victoria. November. H'S. MEDICAL OFFICER. Listowel Union Workhouse. Ireland, six years. SURGEON. Hospital Ship in the Crimea during the war. two years. SURGEON SUPERINTENDANT Government Civil Hospitals. Hongkong;. two years Resident and Office. 254 fourth street, betweea Howard and Folsom. N. W. corner. del4-

 

 

 

Daily Alta California, Volume 42, Number 14323, 22 November 1888

 

Curtin and Fitzmaurice murder

 

The taking of testimony was resumed, and George Curtin gave the details of the murder of his father. After the murder the Curtin family were boycotted and their servants were compelled to leave their service. ■ Curtin testified that he was a member of the league when it was first organized. His father was vicepresident of a branch. Witness had no reason to believe that the league was implicated in the crimes • against hia . family. Various branches of the league had denounced the murder of his father. Norah Fitzmurice deposed that in June, 1887, a letter signed by a maa named Dowling, secretary of a branch of the league, was received by her father, requesting him to attend a meeting. Her father did not go. After thia the people's demeanor toward her father changed and he obtained police protection. The witness gave in detail facts in connection with the shooting oi her father while on his way to the Listowel Fair. Her father and uncle had disagreed respecting a farm on which her father resided, and the people sided with her uncle. She knew the League had been suppressed in the county of Kerry. Counsel for the Parnellites here read an article in the Kerry Sentinel condemning the murder of Fitzmurice and regretting that the League had been suppressed, and shaking of the beneficial effects which arose from tho organization.

 

 

San Francisco

STACK— In this city. April 8, 1904. Miss Johanna Stack. Sister of the late Michael Stack, a native of Listowel, County Kerry, Ireland, aged 68 years. (Los Angeles papers please copy.) Friends and acquaintances are respectfully invited to attend the funeral to-morrow (Sunday), at 1 o'clock, from the residence Of Mrs. P. J. Halllean. 3528 Twenty-third street, between Valencia and Guerrero, then to St. James Church, where services will be held at 1:30 o'clock. Interment Holy Cross Cemetery.

 

San Francisco

O'CONNOR— In this city. October 7. 1894. Edward O'Connor, a native of Listowel, County Kerry. Ireland, aged 55 years. Friends and acquaintances are respectfully Invited to attend the funeral THIS DAY (Tuesday), at 10 o'clock a. m . from the parlors of J. C. O'Connor Co., 767 Mission street. thence to St. .mines Church, corner Twenty-third and Guerrero streets, for services. Interment Holy Cross Cemetery.

 

San Francisco Call, Volume 96, Number 35, 5 July 1904

 

BARRY — In Paskenta, Tehama County. Cal.. July 1, 1904, William, dearly beloved brother of James. Rev. "Father Barry of St. Patrick's Church, and Sister Damien of Dominican Convent of San Rafael, a native of Listowel, County Kerry. Ireland, aged 20 years. E7"The funeral will take place to-day {Tuesday) at 9:30 o'clock from St. Patrick's Church, where a solemn requiem high mass will be celebrated for the repose of his soul. Interment Holy Cross Cemetery. Remain at the parlours of J. C. O'Connor & Co.. .767 Mission street. The members of Division 5. A. O. H. In A., are requested to attend the funeral of the late William Barry, brother of James J. Barry, the Rev. Father Barry and Sister Damien of the Dominican Order, San Rafael. Tuesday morning at 9:30 o'clock, from St Patrick's Church. R. J. CURTIN. President E. P. HOGAN, Secretary. All members of the A. O. H. in A. are Invited to attend the funeral of William Barry, brother of James J. Barry. Rev. Father Barry and Sister Damien of the Dominican Sisters; San Rafael, Tuesday morning at 0:30 o'clock.- from St Patrick's Church.

 

 

San Francisco 20 Feb 1898

WALSH— In this city, February 19, 1898. James E. Walsh, a native of the parish of Listowel. County Kerry, Ireland, aged 33 years. funeral will take place this day (Sunday), at 10:45 o'clock, from the parlors of J. C. O'Connor & Co., 767 Mission street. Interment Holy Cross Cemetery, by 11:30 o'clock train from Third and Townsend street.

Y. M. I.— Members of Cathedral Council No. 59, Y. M. I.: You are requested to assemble this day (Sunday), at 10 o'clock, at the parlors of J. C. O'Connor & Co., 767 Mission street, to attend the funeral of our late brother, James E. Walsh. By order of JOHN D. MAHONEY, Pres. ED L. MINAN, Cor. Sec.

Y. M. I.— lgnatian Council No. 35. Y. M. I.: The annual requiem mass for our deceased brother members will be celebrated in St. Mary's Church (Paulists) Tuesday, February 22, beginning at 10 o'clock. All members of the order and friends are respectfully Invited to attend. J. J. O'TOOLE, Pres. CL Ebner. Sec.

 

18 May 1912 San Francisco

MALONEY—In Pacific Grove, Cal., May IT. 1912, Parick C. Maloney. husband of the lute Fannie A. Maloney, and' father of J. F. Maloney and the late James D. Maloney. a native of Listowel, Ireland, aged 72 years. Interment St. Helena, Cal., tomorrow (Sunday) morning.

 

13 April 1905 San Francisco check fate of death.

SHAW— In this city. April 12, 1906, Mrs . B. A Shaw relict of Daniel -J.Shaw, and beloved aunt of Thomas J. Lennon and Evelyn O'Connor, a native of . Listowel, ; County Kerry Ireland, aged 60 years. The funeral will take place to-morrow (Friday), at 8:30 a. m.. from her late residence. ' Marguerite Hotel, 421 : Larkin street, thence to St. Joseph's Church, where a solemn requiem high mass will be celebrated for the repose of her soul at 9. a. m. Interment private.

 

 

 

San Francisco 12 Dec 1902

HENNEQUIN— In San Diego. December 10, 1902, Mrs. Nellie Hennequin, beloved wife of August Hennequin, mother of Louis, John and Leo Hennequin, and sister of Thomas Lynch, Mrs. J. W. Dyer and Mrs. H. E. Bodmer, a native of Listowel, County Kerry, . Ireland.

 

 

 

 

 

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San Francisco 20 Sept 1902

McKENNA. In this city, September 18 1902, Margaret McKenna. a native of Listowel County Kerry. Ireland, aged 76 year. Mother of Mrs Fitzgerald, M W McKenna and Margaret McKenna. The funeral will take place. (Saturday), at 9:30 o'clock from her late residence. 110 Perry street, thence to St Rose's Church, where a solemn requiem mass for her soul at lO o'clock. Interment Holy Cross Cemetery.

 

 

San Francisco Call, Volume 74, Number 26, 26 June 1893

Died in Ireland. John Kirby, a young man well and favourably known in this city, died recently in Listowel, County Kerry, Ireland, after a lingering illness. The deceased was a brother of Rev. T. Kirby of St. Francis de Sales Church and Key. W. Kirby of St. Mary's Cathedral. San Francisco. To-morrow morning a solemn requiem high mass will be celebrated in St. Francis de Sales Church for the repose of his soul

 

PARISH PRIESTS NAMED

San Francisco Call, Volume 77, Number 133, 22 April 1895

 

Father Kirby Assumes Charge of the New St. Agnes Church.

Rev. Father Kirby has been appointed pastor of the new parish of St. Agnes by the Most Rev. Archbishop Riordan, and Rev. Father Wyman has been named superior of the Paulist community at old St. Mary's Church on California street to succeed the late Father Brady. Father Kirby preached his first sermon

at St. Agnes Church, which is a neat little edifice on Masonic street, near Page, at the high mass yesterday morning. The church was built as an outside mission to the Sacred Heart parish, and was under the jurisdiction of Rev. Father Flood. Father Kirby is a young man of zeal and talent. He was born at Listowel, County Kerry, Ireland, on April 16, 1860. His early education was gained at Mount Mellery and at All Hallows. Later he attended the seminary of St. Sulpice in Paris. On the 17th of March, 1883, he was ordained by Bishop Higgins of Kerry, Ireland. He "came to San Francisco in the spring of 1883. His first appointment was as chaplain of St. Mary's College, from where he was transferred to Father King's church in Oakland. Later he served two years as assistant to Father Serda at Temescal. On September 2, 1885, he was appointed as assistant at the cathedral, where he has since resided. Of his family a brother is a priest, Rev. Thomas Kirby, at Mission Dolores, and two Sisters are members of the Presentation Order, Sister Augustine in Berkeley, and Sister de Sales in the Powell-street convent, this city.

 

 

 

San Francisco Call, Volume 95, Number 65, 3 February 1904

 

FATHER KIRBY DIES AFTER A LONG ILLNESS

Rev. Father William P. Kirby. the beloved rector of St. Agnes parish. Masonic avenue and Page Street, passed peacefully away at his residence yesterday evening after an illness of two months. .At the time of his death he was still a young man. Father Kirby 'was born in Listowel. County Kerry, Ireland. April 15, 1860. He spent his boyhood days in his native town, which is near the famous Lakes of Killarney, and received his early education in the little parish school.

After finishing his "primary education Father Kjrby attended Mount Mellery Academy. When his course at that school was completed he was sent to All Hallows College, Dublin, where he graduated with honours and gained the distinction of being one of the, brightest pupils in his class. From there he went to the. noted college of St. Sulpice. Paris, to finish his education. When his course at that institution was completed Father Kirby returned to his native town, where he was ordained a priest on March ' 17, 1883. .

Shortly 'thereafter" he sailed for the United States and came direct to San Francisco. He was first assigned to old St. Mary's College on the Mission road. After remaining' there for several years he, was transferred to Oakland, acting as Father King's assistant for some time. From there he went to assist Father Serda in another Oakland parish. He was next assigned to St. Mary's Cathedral where he remained for a long time and became very popular with both the priests and parishioners. In 1895 the Archbishop, recognizing the ability of Father Kirby, placed him in charge of St. Agnes Church. From the time he, went, to the parish he made, his presence felt. He did much good in the vicinity of the park and was the most popular priest that ever had charge of the parish.

No arrangements have been made for the funeral. The body will lie in state at St. Agnes; Church to-day and all the of the city will gather around the bier and pay their last respects to the departed rector.

 

 

 

 

 

http://newspapers.bc.edu/cgi-bin/bostonsh?a=d&d=BOSTONSH18990204-01.2.25&srpos=3&e=-------en-20--1--txt-IN-listowel-

Elections Sacred Heart Review 4 Feb 1899

all the old ideas of electing men of property and social standing seem to have been completely upset. In Listowel, a small town in Kerry, the whole district board, except one merchant, is composed of labourers.

 

 

11 Nov 1911 Saced Heart Review Boston College.

The Right Rev. Richard A. O'Connor, D. D., Bishop of Petersborough, Canada, recently celebrated the golden jubilee of his ordination to the priesthood. Bishop O'Connor was born at Listowel, County Kerry, Ireland, April 15, 1838. He went to Canada in 1841 with his parents, and settled in Toronto.

Also in paper

Diamond jubilee year of the A. 0. H. in the United States, the order puts forward the following interesting figures: Membership, 160,--000; membership of Juveniles, 20,000; membership of the Ladies' Auxiliary, 66,000; membership of the Ladies' Auxiliary Juveniles, 4,000; values of real estate, $1,002,000; values of personal property, $200,300; value of Ladies' Auxiliary personal property, $49,132.58; cash in Division treasuries, $1,153,--030.49; cash in Division treasuries, Ladies' Auxiliary, $201,--545.75; expended for charity, sickness and death, 1909, $1,160--932.51; expended for charity, sickness and death, Ladies' Auxiliary, 1909, $888,019.20.

 

1889 Oct 19 Sacred Heart Review

Captain Massey, who, with Cecil Roche, passed a six months' sentence upon Mr. William O'Brien, at Killarney, died suddenly at Listowel on Saturday last. The captain, it is stated, was engaged to be married.

 

 

Sacred Heart Review 10 June 1905

An interesting light is thrown on the Catholicity of the Church when we read of a Father Kennelly, S. J., in China, who has a brother a parish priest in South Australia, and two sisters belonging to the Mercy Order in California. They belong to a North Kerry family in Ireland. The Chinese priest speaks English, French, Spanish, Portuguese, Italian, and several Chinese dialects, and is proud of his knowledge of his Irish tongue.

 

 

 

The Limerick Reporter & Tipperary Vindicator, 14 June 1895

CIVIL BILL OFFICERS.
The following are the persons appointed for the service of Civil Bill Processes for the County:-
DIVISION OF RATHKEALE
Jeremiah Lenihan, Abbeyfeale, Abbeyfeale.
Patrick Fay, Adare, Adare.
John Madigan, Askeaton, Askeaton.
John Hartnett, Ballingarry, Ballingarry.
Daniel Sexton, Dromcollogher, Dromcollogher.
John M'Elligott, Glin, Glin.
Thomas Walker and James Iriwin, Newcastle, Newcastle.
Thomas Coyne, Pallaskenry, Pallaskenry.
James Hennessy, Rathkeale, Rathkeale.
Richard Martin, Shanagolden, Shanagolden.
John Martin, Ballyhahill, Foynes.



The Limerick Reporter & Tipperary Vindicator, 14 May 1867

A MONSTER SALMON
An enormous salmon 47 lbs. in weight, was yesterday caught by a rod and line, by Mr. H. N. Seymour in the Shannon. It had to be borne on the shoulders of two men to be weighed! -The fish baffled the exertions of several tried [sic] anglers before Mr. Seymour took it.

The Limerick Reporter & Tipperary Vindicator, 28 September 1866

DEATHS
This morning at Peter's Cell House, in this city, after a truly Christian life, Anne, daughter of the late James Ahern, Esq.
At his residence near Ardagh, on the morning of the 25th inst. Mr. John Ambrose, aged 80 years-A good landlord, a kind neighbour, and a sincere friend. May he rest in peace.
On the 16th July last, at St. Louis, state of Missourie [sic], America, Marion, aged 15 months, daughter of Mr. Andrew Jemaison, and granddaughter of Mr Wm. Moloney, Petty Sessions Clerk, Patrickswell. R.I.P.


The Limerick Reporter & Tipperary Vindicator, 31 May 1864

DECOYING IRISH GIRLS FOR PURPOSES OF PROSTITUTION
---
The system which has been pursued of hiring girls in the old country, and consigning them to parties here is about to be stopped, it having come to the knowledge of the agent that this is only a plan for decoying poor girls from their homes in Ireland for the worst of purposes. On Monday a person claiming to be a friend of two young girls who he said were consigned to him, was recognised as a notorious keeper of a house of ill-fame, and the girls were not permitted to leave Castle Garden.-New York Sun.


The Limerick Reporter & Tipperary Vindicator, 29 January 1864

Mary Hurly, aged 23 years, a victim of leprosy, died in the County Infirmary Limerick, on Sunday last. This disease, it appears, she contracted by washing the clothes of some foreign sailors. The malady was malignant. In Ireland formerly every corporate city had its regal grants for a Leper Hospital-and the lands of the Limerick Leper House were very extensive. In Waterford the annual grants of land are still appropriated to the support of the medical institutions, even yet called "The Leper Hospital," and in that county, consequently, there is no county infirmary.
ADARE MANOR-The Earl and Countess of Dunraven have been entertaining at Adare Manor during the last ten days a large and distinguished party of visitors, amongst whom were :- The Earl and Countess of Erne, Lady Louisa Chrichton, Marquis of Beaumont, Hon. C. Crichton, Lord and Lady Cloncurry, Hon. Emly Lawless, Hon. Valentine Lawless, Miss Cole, Miss Emily Cole, Lord Hastings, Hon. Gerald Dillon, Hon. Vesey Dawson, Captain Saunderson, Mrs. Gore Booth, Mr. Edward Saunderson, Mr. Brinsley Nixon, Mr. Llewellyn Saunderson, Mr. Burke, of Thornfield ; Stephen De Vere, Esq., &c., &c.



The Limerick Chronicle
20 October 1849

The Rathkeale sessions concluded on Wednesday, the number of civil
bills tried having been 600 and 25 ejectments. The grand jury were
sworn on Monday, Edward Brown of Wilton, Esq., foreman. The
following are the convictions: Michael Hannigen, larceny of £5
from his employer, Archdeacon Warburton, to be transported
7 years; Daniel Mulvihane, larceny, 1 month; John Neill do.,
one year; James Ahern, John Hayes, Michl Dillane, John Lacey,
Thomas Flaherty, cow stealing, 15 years transportation; John
Carroll sheep stealing, 15 years; Ellen Dwyer, larceny, one
month; ...John Fraley, Michl Fraley and Edwd. Fraley, cow
stealing, 9 months; John Kiely, do. 1 year; ...Michl Ryan,
cow stealing, 15 years; ... The above prisoners were escorted
to the county gaol on Thursday evening by sub inspector Channer
and Constabulary Adare. Robert Tighe, Esq. Assistant-Barrister,
opened his sessions court at Bruff this day, for trial of civil
business.

 

 

 The following statement was in this issue of BWN.
Mr Pierce Mahony:

In reference to the incident which occurred in the Four Courts, and in refutation of the statement said to have given rise to the occurrence, we (Irish Times) are asked by Mr.Geo. Gun Mahony to say that his brother, Mr Pierce Mahony, is the youngest son of the late Mr. P.K. Mahony, J.P., of Kilmorna, County Kerry, by his marriage with Jane, daughter of the late Mr.Robert Gun Cuninghame, D.L, of Mountkennedy, and his first wife, Elizabeth, only child and heir of Mr Archibald Hamilton Foulkes, of Coolawinna, both in County Wicklow; and that his grandfather, the late Mr Pierce Mahony, D.L., of Kilmorna, Kerry, was the son of Mr P Mahony, of Woodlawn, in the same county, J.P. for Counties Kerry and Limerick, by his marriage with Anna Maria, daughter, daughter of Mr John Maunsell, J.P., of Ballybrood, County Limerick.
 
 
KS Jan 2nd 1879.
 
LISTOWEL PETTY SESSIONS—
M
ONDAY.   Before the Hon, J. French, R.M. (presiding), and Mr. P. H. M'Carthy, J.P.
   John O'Connor, Meen, was fined 10s and costs for being drunk and disorderly.
   John Ahern for allowing an ass and cart on the public streets on the 22nd December, without having anyone in charge, was fined 5s. and costs.
   For being drunk in charge of a horse and cart Maurice Lenihan was fined 5s.
   Margaret Walsh, Forge Lane, charged Michael Flynn with abusive and threatening language.
   The defendant was bound to the peace for twelve months, himself in £5 and two sureties of £2 10s each. 
   Flynn charged Maurice Walsh, the husband of the last complainant, with assault.
   The case was dismissed, as it appeared the defendant interfered when Flynn was abusing and threatening his wife.
   A number of parties were fined the usual sums for drunkenness during the holidays.
   Some cases were adjourned to convenience Mr. Creagh, solicitor, who was absent.
 
 
THREE AT A BIRTH IN KERRY. Killarney, Thursday Night.        The night before last a Mrs. Clifford, the wife of a labourer, in humble circumstances, residing at Barley Mount, gave birth to three sons. Dr. Wm. M'Sweeney, who attended at the accouchement, states that the triplets are exceedingly healthy, and that they and the mother are doing well. Steps are being taken to bring the extraordinary birth under the notice of the Queen, with a view of securing the Royal bounty, usually given in such cases. Mrs. Clifford is now the mother of fourteen children, all of whom are living.
 
 
 
The Kerry Sentinel, 27 January 1904

 

Listowel Petty Sessions
INSUBORDINATE PAUPERS
The Listowel Board of Guardians summoned two able bodied inmates of the workhouse, viz. Thomas Lynch, and James Kissane with being guilty of insubordination to officers by refusing to work on the 13th January.
   Mr M. J. Byrne solr represented the Guardians.
   Mr Daniel Hickey, Master, and Matthew Riordan, a wardsman, were examined and proved the refusal.
   Lynch's case was adjourned for a month to see how he would conduct himself in the meantime, and Kissane was sentenced to one month in jail with hard labour.
  The Kerry Sentinel, 30 January 1904

 

Death of Centenarians, Near Listowel
The death recently took place of Patrick M'Elligott, Lybes, parish of Duagh, at the age of 103 years, and of John O'Sullivan, Islandanny, at the age of 104 years.
 The Kerry Sentinel, 27 April 1912
Kerry Surgeon on Titanic.
———
   Dr Wm F N O'Loughlin, the senior Surgeon of the S.S. Titanic, and who went down with that great steamer on the morning of the 15th inst, was born in Tralee. He was second son of the late Mr William O'Loughlin, and some of the older inhabitants may remember his grandfather, the late Mr Benjamin Matthews, of Nelson-street, Tralee.
The Recent Illness of Mr T Gibson, Listowel.
———
HIS RECOVERY AND WELCOME HOME.
———
   After an absence of five months in the metropolis, through illness, Mr Thomas Gibson has returned to his splendid and well-known establishment and home in Listowel fully, we are glad to say, recovered to health and vigour. Mr Gibson was, needles to say, in the hands of the best members of the medical faculty in Dublin, including his own talented and able son, the distinguished master of the Coombe Hospital, and as a result of this, of course, considerably aided by his own magnificent constitution, we have once more amongst us one of Listowel's most popular and genial citizens.
 
The Limerick Chronicle, 13 July 1786
   
   We are assured by a gentleman just returned from Philadelphia, that the United States are scrupulously watchful in preventing Night Houses ; and as some Irish emigrants have commenced that dangerous establishment there, an edict has been published, subjecting all housekeepers embarking in that business to the severest penalties that Congress can inflict. For say the American legislators, youth is thereby initiated into all the mysteries of profligate vice ; servants pillage their masters, and the unthinking masters themselves too often bring bankruptcies on their families by frequenting these houses of infernal notoriety! — What a salutary example to this country where these dwellings are become so numerous?
The Limerick Chronicle, 27 April 1790

 

Saturday Michael Carroll, Boatman, fell out of a turf boat, near Cahirron, and was unfortunately drowned.
Thursday last Mr. Tim O'Neill fell from his horse near Pallasgreen, and was killed on the spot.
A respite until Saturday the 19th of Next May, was received of Friday from the Hon. Justice Kelly, for Patrick Murphy who was to have been hanged on Saturday last.
Married. Mr. Quinton, of Briton-street, Sadlier, to Miss Jones of Drogheda.
Last night the wife of Timothy Cunningham, an industrious Labouring man, who lives in the Little Island, was safely delivered of three male children who are all living.
 
Limerick Chronicle
Limerick, Ireland
Wednesday 6 September 1809:

A List of the Names and Places of Abode of the several persons who had taken
out Licenses for killing Game, agreeable to Act of Parliament, from the
Distributor of Stamps for the Co. and City of Limerick, between the 25th day
of March 1809 and the 4th day of Sept. 1809.

Abraham Abell Esq, Limerick
James O'Brien Esq, Quinpoole
Dennis O'Brien Esq, Newcastle
William Browne Esq, Rathcahill
Saul Bruce Esq, Castle Connell
Jeffery Browning Esq, Carass
Richard Barclay Esq, Ballyartney
Rev. Wm Butler, Castle Crin
Francis H. Bindon Esq, Corbally
Sir John Allen De Bourgho, Bart., Castle Connell
John Baylee Esq, North Strand
John Massy Bolton Esq, Massy Park
Edmond Bourke Esq, Ballyvoreen
John Southwell Brown Esq, Mount Brown
John Copley Esq, Ballyclough
Edward Crips Esq, Kilpeacon
James Cooper Esq, Cooper Hill
Edward Croker Esq, Ballynegaurd
Joseph Condon Esq, Ardgoul
John Clanchy Esq, Limerick
Henry Pierce Carroll Esq, Meelick Lodge
Hunt Walsh Chambre Esq, Rahtkeale
Joseph Crips Esq, Limerick
John Cliffe, Game-keeper to William Smyth Esq, Ballylin
John Eastcott, Game-keeper to Lord Courtenay, Newcastle
Michael Fitz-Gerald Esq, Wood
Benjamin Frend Esq, Boskill
Francis Fosbery Esq, Curra Bridge
Edward Griffin Esq, Glin
Poole Gabbett Esq, Limerick
Rev. John Graves, Fort William
Richard Going Esq, Park Lodge
Gerald Griffin Esq, Corgrigg
Wm O'Hara Esq, Limerick
Patrick Hinchu, Game-keeper to Edward Croker Esq, Ballynaguard
Wm Hen jun, Esq, Dublin
John Harrison Esq, Limerick
Wm. Hammond Esq, Limerick
John Hurst Esq, Pallace
Wm hunt Esq, Friarstown
Robert Levers Esq, Mount levers
Francis Lloyd Esq, Violet Hill
James Langford Esq, Prospect Lodge
John Lowe Esq, Kilfrush
Edward Lloyd Esq, Castle Mahon
Peter Lowe Esq, Rivers Castle
John Lee Esq, Bettyville
Hon. John Massy, Massy Park
Thomas Mark Esq, Limerick
Martin Mara, Game-keeper to Francis B. Wilkinson Esq, Cahirilla
Rev. Charles Massy, Summer Hill
Mr. Patrick Mullins, Ballybriken
Hugh Massy Esq, Glenville
Hon. George Eyre Massy, Riverdale
Wm Odell Esq, Grove
Alexander Odell Esq, Ballyhegran
Richard Crone Odell Esq, Newcastle
Richard Parsons Esq Cragbeg
Richard Philips Esq, Mount Rivers
Wm Parsons Esq, Cragbeg
David Roche jun Esq, Carass
David Roche sen, Esq Carass
George Wm Russell Esq, Limerick
Mathew Reddan Esq, Tomgreany
Christopher Rose Esq, Rathkeale
John Singleton Esq, Limerick
Michael Scanlan Esq, Ballinknockane
Wm Smyth Esq, Ballylin
Thomas Sherlock Esq, Green Hills
Anthony Symes, Game-keeper to David Lynch Esq, Kilmore
George Tuthill Esq, Faha
Luke Tomkins Esq, O'Brien's Bridge
Exham Vincent Esq, Violet Hill
Thomas Tuthill Villiers Esq, Limerick
Rev. John Warburton, Limerick
James Willington Esq, Limerick
Henry Warner Esq, Rathkeale

Certified by me, Philip Walsh, Distributor of Stamps for the Co. and City of
Limerick.

The Commissioners for managing Stamp Duties, give Notice that they have
given positive directions to the several Inspectors and Distributors of
Stamp Duties, to prosecute all Persons who shall be found offending against
the Game Duty Act, and to levy the Penalties prescribed by Law. Sept 6,
1809.
 
 

Limerick Chronicle
Limerick,  Limerick, Ireland
Saturday, 2 Mar 1822

 

Limerick Special Session under the Insurrection Act; Thurs, February 28, 1822.
Friday March 1, 1822
County court -

EDWARD MARKHAM - charged with having in his possession at Mt. Brown
on 28th ult one case of pistols which he denied possession of and for being an idle and disorderly person.

When the Clerk of the Peace read the indictment, the prisoner desired he should read it again, which was done. He again desired a repetition in a more audible voice, seemed to smile and appeared to have no concern as to his condition. The Court interposed and remonstrated with the prisoner as to his assumed levity. Sergeant Torrens then repeated the words of the indictment to the prisoner to which he replied that he was not idle or disorderly, that the arms were certainly found in his house but that no charge was ever before preferred against him.
Thomas McEnnis, private of the Third Dragoons,stated in evidence that he repaired with others on the night of the 28th of February in search of arms in the neighbourhood of Mount Brown accompanied by Mr. Brown a Magistrate, and demanded arms at the house of the prisoner who said that he had no arms in his possession. Mr. Brown made a diligent search after the soldiers and found in the
bottom of the cupboard a brace of pistols one of which was silver tipped,  the other was of a large size and seemingly a military one.

Witnesses said to prisoner that he was a fool to bring such desolution and trouble upon himself to which he replied that "It can't be helped now!"

John S. Brown Jr. Esquire, a magistrate, said that on the night of the 28th he proceeded to the party of the 42nd and some of the police which amounted to about 19 men. They searched some of the houses in the neighbourhood of Mount Brown which is distant from Rathkaele about 3 miles. At about 3 o'clock in the morning he proceeded to the prisoner's house. One of the soldiers searched
the house after demanding arms but could find none. Witness examined after the soldiers and found concealed in the lower part of the cupboard a large pistol mounted with brass and one of a smaller size tipped with silver both in good preservation.
The prosecution closed and the prisoner had no defence. He was found Guilty.

Pat Barrett, Andrew Kennedy, John Enright, Michael Danneher, James Shire, Pat Corbett, Michael Naughton, Michael Mailey, Daniel Neill, Michael Neill, Thomas Welsh, John Murphy, Patrick Welsh, Pat Fitzgerald charged with idle and disorderly persons did tumultously and unlawfully assemble on 28th February ult at Old Abbey in the daytime against the peace and the statute.

Major Wilcox stated that about the same place where the above prisoners were taken, large parties assembled in open day armed and legislating. 300 appeared in Cop..? Demesne that he had delayed taking any steps against the insurgents knowing that in a few days the Insurrection Act would be in force and that his
powers would be enlarged, that the parties went out by his directions and took the prisoners at the Bar.

William Smith, Chief Constable, stated that on the 28th he received orders to scour the neighbourhood of Shanagolden near Old Abbey and having come on a hilll he saw a multitude of persons to the number of 100 who had dispersed in all directions when they perceived his party. He however succeeded in taking 14 prisoners which are now at the Bar. They were near the houses of Mr. Morgan and Mrs. Farrell. Mr. Morgan and family were all armed ready for defence. Witness recognised most of the prisoners. They underwent a cross-examination by Mr. Fitzgerald but nothing was elicited.

John Markham, 'fhomas Dallas, Frederick Jackson, Thomas Halloran, 3rd light dragoons, and Thomas Preston of the Police severally gave their evidence as to the number assembled and they severally identified the prisoners arrested.

For the defence, the widow Farrell said that a number of persons came towards her house looking for firing and the country was distressed for fuel, that she sent her son-in-law for one of the prisoners, Naughton, to remonstrate with the party having no brushwood after which they went off peacably and showed no violence. She frequently before this gave them firing. Connors her son-in-law gave evidence similarly.

The Court retired and after some deliberation they brought in a verdict of Guilty against Patrick Barrett, John Enright, Michael Dannaher, James Shire, Patrick Corbett, Patrick Welsh and Patrick Fitzgerald. Naughton, Daniel and Michael Niell, Mealey, Murphy and Welsh were liberated, it having appeared from the evidence that there were some doubts of their guilt. They received the benefit thereof.

EDWARD MARKHAM, first prisoner convicted, was then put to the Bar.

Sergeant Torrens then addressed MARKHAM in a most impressive manner upon the nature of his offence and told him that this very moment, even while the sentence of the Court was pronouncing upon him, preparations were making for taking him out of the country.He was sentenced to transportation.
 The seven persons whose names are already enumerated were then addressed by Sgt Torrens in a very energetic manner, touching upon the disordered, frightful and alarming state of the County, and the awful consequences which must succeed to the commission of those crimes. He felt it his duty to eulogise the firm, zealous and excellent conduct of Mr. Brown of Mount Brown, the Magistrate, whose exertions must be a subject of admiration and which, if imitated, the most beneficial results to the peace, order and tranquility to the
County will follow.

In this panegyric the entire Bench fully acquiesced. He then told the prisoners that they were now about the quit their country. This very instant, preparations were making for their bidding adieu to their families, friends and all that they held dear, and he sincerely hoped their punishment would prove a salutary lesson to the misguided.

He then sentenced each of the prisoners to Transportation for 7 years to any of His Majesty's colonies which should be selected for them. Sgt. Torrens then said, "Mr. Sheriff, see that these men
be removed forthwith for transportation. The promptness of the trial, sentence and the execution of it had a most impressive effect on the Court as well as the populace.

At half past 5 o'clock Captain Thompson, Governer of the County Gaol, placed the above 8 men on two carts at the courthouse door and a detachment of the 43rd Light Infantry, being in readiness, they were instantly forwarded to Charleville on their way to Cork to be put on board the hulks for transportation agreeable to sentence.

Submitted by: Frank Murray
murrayfc@homemail.com.au


Limerick Chronicle
co. Limerick, Ireland
Wednesday, 6 Mar 1822

County Limerick Special Sessions, Saturday 2 March

Thomas SHAUGHNESSY, an able stout man, was put to the bar, charged with
being an idle and disorderly person under the Act, having been out of his
home at half past ten o'clock on the night of the 28th ultimate.

William JOHNSON, one of the Adare Yeomanry, deposed that he saw a house
burning belonging to Mr. FOSBERY on the 28th ult; when he first saw the fire
he was two miles distant from it; accompanied by a detachment of the 42nd
Regiment, and a policeman hastened to the place; when he arrived there, it
was all in flames, being a thatched house; there was one woman in the house
at the time it was set on fire; and she was got out; some of the 42nd from
Kildimo had arrived there before his party; he and his party then searched
the adjoining houses to see it the inhabitants were within; they went into
SHAUGHNESSY's house and saw an old man sitting by the fire; while they were
interrogating the old man the prisoner rushed in from the back door in great
heat, as if after a chase, and on being asked where he was, he said that he
was feeding the cow, upon which witness to ascertain the truth and found the
cow in the yard without any food before it, but saw another man in the
stable, where there were two horses; the distance from the back door to the
cow was not more than eight or nine yards. (The prisoner addressed the
witness from the dock, denying having said he was feeding the cow, but that
he was feeding the horses).
Daniel ROSS, a soldier of the 42nd Regt. was in the house of the prisoner on
the night stated, and saw him come through the back door; he seemed in a
great heat, as if after running-the witness put his hand upon the Prisoner's
side, and felt his heart palpitate.
COURT: Witness, you know what it is to run after an enemy, and not from
him-was it a state of heat similar to that he was in?
WITNESS: smiling-"Yes, my Lord, as if he was after a chase."

Prisoner told witness also, that he had been feeding cows. Francis MAGINAS,
a soldier of the 42nd deposed that prisoner told him after he had come in,
that he was feeding horses; Prisoner said that after the yeoman and soldier
had interrogated him
The Prosecution closed, and for the defence was called Patrick SHAUGHNESSY,
brother to the Prisoner, who stated that he was not long in bed when the
army came in; that he had given directions to his brother to put the cow in
the stable; his brother was not long gone when the soldiers were searching
the house. On his cross examination, he could not tell whether four or five
minutes or three or four hours in bed, before the soldiers had arrived, but
he believed four or five minutes; he had no watch and how could he tell.

The case closed, and the Magistrates and Court consulted, and the Prisoner
was promptly found Guilty, and as promptly sentenced to seven years
Transportation. The Court and Magistrates were fully of opinion that the
Prisoner was at the burning of Mr. FOSBERY's house. The Court observed, that
a report had been currently circulated that New South Wales was a
comfortable place to be transported to, but the Prisoner would find, and the
Public may be assured, that an Island not so comfortable would be selected
by the Government.

Murtock SULLIVAN, an aged man, was put to the Bar-he was the person found in
the stable of the last Prisoner, hiding behind the door at the tail of the
horses, and the door fastened inside. He had the appearance of fresh mud on
his feet and legs; his case was a short one, he could offer no defence and
it was equally presumed that he had ran in there to hide from the soldiers,
after the burning of the house. He was found guilty and sentenced to seven
years transportation.

 

Limerick Chronicle August 4 1821

Death
At an advanced age, Mr. Francis McNamara, Castletown.

Submitted by Declan

Limerick Chronicle, Saturday, August 18th, 1821:

LIMERICK, SATURDAY, AUGUST 18.
Engagement between the County Limerick Police, and a party of nightly Marauders.
    On Wednesday night, upwards of two hundred misguided wretches, mostly armed, many of them mounted on horseback, and the entire dressed in white shirts, surrounded the house of Mr. John Ives, Tithe-Proctor, at Inchirourke, near Askeaton. After dragging him out of the house on the high-way, they proceeded to administer oaths, prohibiting him from ever interfering in tithe business; and while thus employed, a party of Mr. Going's Police, consisting of seventeen Sub-Constables, under the command of Thomas Doolan, Esq. Chief Peace Officer, approached the house, having received private information in Rathkeale that such proceedings would take place during the night. On being challenged by Mr. Doolan, and commanded to surrender, they drew up in regular line for battle, and immediately commenced firing on the Police, by an order from their leader. In that discharge, one of the Police , named Thomas manning, was shot dead. Mr. Doolan instantly ordered his party to fire in return,  which was quickly obeyed, and a regular volley obliged the assailants to break line and disperse in all directions. A charge was then made by the Police, who succeeded in taking three prisoners, in full costume; two were also found dead, similarly attired. A pursuit after the fugatives took place, and many skirmishes occurred, in which upwards of sixty shots were fired by the Police.
     From every information that can be collected, great numbers have been wounded , and, we are told, several dead bodies are concealed in the neighborhood. Those found by the Police, in the first instance, were taken to Rathkeale, where they were interred on Thursday, without coffins, in a large hole dug up by their companions, in a piece of waste ground, near the Guard-house. The two prisoners were compelled by Mr. Going to perform all offices at the burial -- after digging the hole, they were obliged to bear the bodies and place them beneath, and afterwards to shake quick-lime plentifully over them.
     Another of the gang died last night in a hut on the mountain, where he had been removed from the scene of the action; his name is Moran, and was brother to one of the prisoners in custody -- he was shot through the abdomen.
     Many more would have been shot by the Police, but after the first volley, the fellows all dismounted and took shelter behind their horses.
     The road in the neighborhood of Askeaton present a most horrid appearance --- streams of blood in various parts, and the different gaps, across which the wounded were borne away, are all besmeared with blood.
     There were fifteen horses brought into Rathkeale by the Police, upon which those wretches were mounted, but had deserted --- many of them were dreadfully wounded.
     A considerable number of spits, old scythes and some firearms, were brought into Rathkeale by the Police.
     On the return of Mr. Doolan's party to Rathkeale, on Thursday, there was a meeting of Magistrates sitting in the Sessions-House, and who had been called a few days previous, to take into considration the state of that part of the County. A Resolution of Thanks was immediately voted to Mr. Doolan, and the Police under his command, for the very spirited and determined conduct which they evinced on this occasion, the result of which, it is hoped, will have a happy and lasting effect on the peace of the County.
     Mr. Doolan missed fire twice at the leader of the gang, his pistol having got wet. He was very close to him at the time, and would certainly have shot him dead, had the pistol gone off.
     Before the Police came near Ives's house, there were regular sentinels placed at different points to give the main body notice of any alarm. When they were challenged, the answer was, "We are Christians."
     After the volley fired by the Police, the Captain, or Leader of the gang, who was attired in a most conspicuous manner, with a white dress, a cocked-hat and feathers, endeavoured to rally his troops, but without effect.
     It is supposed, from the numbers, that the Police would have suffered severely, were it not for the extreme wetness of the night, which must have had its effect upon the fire-arms, with which they seemed to be well stocked.
     Yesterday a strong cavalry detachment of the Police, well equipped, convoyed three of this notable gang to the County Jail -- they were brought in on horseback, and exactly in the dress as when taken. Their names are, Michael Moran, Michael Halloran, and Michael Fitz-Gerald. One of them, we are told, is willing to give full information against the entire party.
     The Sub-Sheriff, in remonstrating with the prisoners while in the yard of the County Jail, asked them whether they had not been at prayers last Sunday, and whether they had not heard a very strong and impressive exhortation from the Clergyman, to desist from illegal proceedings, which were freely answered in the affirmative.
     The committal of those persons, by Richard Going, Esq. Chief Magistrate of Police, runs thus: -- "For being three of a Body of armed Rebels, (consisting of about 200), apprehended on the night of the 15th instant, at Inchirourke, near Askeaton, in an engagement between said Rebels and the Vounty of Limerick Police, in which Thomas Manning, Sub-Constable was shot dead."
     Yesterday, a strong party of the Police went to Askeaton and Newbridge, in search of some of the wounded persons; we have not yet heard whether they discovered any.
     Inquests were held on the bodies by Mr. Cox, Coroner.

Submitted by Jim

Note: The Morans mentioned are from my Askeaton Moran family history. I would enjoy hearing from anyone with additional documentation about this event. The illiterate Irish peasant version passed by word of mouth can be found at http://www.askeatonbynet.com/rising_of_1798.htm and I would like to find the historical documentation with reference for this version as well

 

 

Limerick Chronicle, Co Limerick, Ireland, 2 July 1831

On Thursday, at his house in Day Place, Tralee, much and
deservedly lamented, Stephen Henry Rice, Esq. for a periof of thirty
years the highly respected Assistant Barrister of the County Kerry.

Wednesday night, at his seat, Six-mile-Bridge, County Clare,
aged 80 years, William Russell, Esq. formerly a resident for over
forty years of Bank-Place, Limerick. This venerated and lamented
Gentleman carries with him to the grave the respect of that numerous
circle, with whom his long course of business made him acquainted, -
the gratitude of relatives, whose interests he anxiously promoted, -
and the affectionate attachment of those who, unrelated to him by
blood, have the more cause to retain in lasting recollection the
disinterested zeal, the ardent friendship, the strict integrity, and
unerring judgement, which distinguished him through life.

 

The Limerick Reporter, 6 September 1839

 

LIMERICK POLICE INTELLIGENCE.
WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 4.
Presiding Magistrate—Alderman H. WATSON.
   A miserable looking creature named Ellen Foley, was brought up. She slept for the last three or four nights—so stated the intelligent policeman—near hall-doors, without hardly a screed to cover her.
   Mr. Alderman Watson—This is a very hard case, but what can we do for her. The House of Industry is full. They sleep in that establishment, three in a bed ; and at this moment there are 580 inmates in an institution, originally intended for no more than 250, and really, the funds are so low, that we cannot support the poor creatures as we would wish ; however, I'll give an order for the poor girls admission—and let a policeman accompany her, but not as a prisoner.
   A young woman of rather patagonian stature, applied to his worship the Alderman, for a summons against her landlady, for keeping her in the house against her will.
   Alderman Watson—Sure she is not keeping you now (laying hold of her arm), aren't you not here standing in this office?—(laughter.)
   Complainant—I am your Worship, but it is my things she's keeping. I offered her the money for the lodging rent, and she wouldn't take it.
   Alderman Watson—I think by the flash of your eye, you appear a little inclined to litigation. I would advise you to bring the matter before the Petty Sessions, and not make a criminal case out of it. The black eyed damsel withdrew, first making a theatrical curtsey.
  
Limerick Reporter 13-3- 1840
 
A bird was shot on the Shannon, on Friday last by Richard Gason, jun. Esq., of Richmond, near Nenagh, the name of which the boatmen of the Shannon and many gentlemen have declared themselves to be ignorant. It is somewhat larger than a duck, has no tail, and its standing position is perpendicular, the legs being placed in the extremity where the tail in another bird would appear ; the feet are webbed like those of a duck, but the talons are much wider ; its neck and bill are long, and the feathers near the head ruffled. Mr. Gason, has sent this rara avis to Glennon, Suffolk-street, Dublin, to be preserved.
 
The Limerick Reporter, 19 June 1840
MARQUIS OF CUNNINGHAM AND HIS TENANTRY.
   In our advertising columns appears the copy of a memorial from over twenty of his lordship's tenantry, who were lately served with notices of ejectment by the agent of the noble Marquis, not for non-payment of rent, but for non-title. We put it to the feelings of the noble Marquis, acknowledged as he is by memorialists never to have disturbed any of his tenantry ; whether in the present instance, and at this season of the year, when those poor people anticipate very shortly to reap the reward of their hard spring-labours, they are to be now thrown adrift upon the wide world from the little spot that gave them birth and reared them, and their forefathers before them. We rest satisfied that that nobility of mind which has hitherto swayed the Marquis of Cunningham, in not depriving honest and industrious tenants of their little shelters, will now prevail upon his lordship, in immediately ordering a suspension of those notices served on memorialists. We therefore anticipate the pleasure of recording that the noble Marquis will not be inexoreable to the humble entreaty.

 






 

 

     
   
OLD BAILEY Trials Sample

JOHN MORAN, ANNIE RYAN, ANNIE DINEEN, ELIZABETH GRIFFIN, MARGARET DALEY, Violent Theft > robbery, 1st May 1882.

Reference Number: t18820501-549

549. JOHN MORAN (22), ANNIE RYAN (20), ANNIE DINEEN (19), ELIZABETH GRIFFIN (18), and MARGARET DALEY (18) , Robbery with violence on Edward Phillips, and stealing 1 lbs. MR. SANDERS Prosecuted;

MR. PUROKLL defended Moran.

EDWARD PHILLIPS . I live at John Street, Rochester—I am a bargeman—at about 11 p.m. on 24th March I was in the Swan public-house, Nine Elms, where I saw Ryan and Dineen—I left there with them and went to the Wedge public-house—when we left they took me down a back street, and four women and a man dung round me and got my hands behind me, and Ryan and Dineen out their hands in my trousers pockets—I called "Police," and they all ran away—I cannot swear to the man—it was dark.

Cross-examined by Ryan. I don't recollect going to the Waterman's Arms and having some beer and bread and cheese—I spent 1s. 6d.—I had 30s. when I went to the Swan.

DANIEL SULLIVAN (Policeman JP 377). I was outside the swan when I saw Ryan and Dineen standing outside—Dineen said to Ryan "There is a bargeman inside flashing some coin, we will wait on him"—I spoke to another constable, and we watched the house—when it was closed the prosecutor came out, and Ryan and Dineen caught hold of him, one on each side, and went to another public-house, the Steam Packet, where they stopped about another 20 minutes—they came out and went to the Waterman's Arms beershop—I saw Moran in the public bar—he left it and went into the private bar where they were—he then went back to the public bar—at 12 o'clock the house closed, and I was called away on more important duty—I came back about 1 o'clock to Currey Street about 200 yards from the Waterman's Arms, when I saw the five prisoners and the prosecutor—they had surrounded him and were pressing him against

the wall—he was shouting "Police," and the other constable and I ran up, and the prisoners ran away—I followed and took Griffin—I did not lose sight of her—I charged her with being concerned with others, not in custody, in robbing "the prosecutor—she said "It's not me; it was the girls Dineen and Ryan "—I took Dineen on 25th March—she said "Going out wearing a hat is enough to give me 18 months "—the prosecutor had been under the influence of drink—he walked to the station all right—there was nothing found on Dineen or Griffin—I was about 23 yards from the prosecutor and the prisoners when I first saw them—I saw them distinctly.

Cross-examined by MR. PURCELL. "When I first saw Moran he came out of the door of the Waterman's Arms—I was eight or nine yards off, across the road—he came out of one door and went into the other—that was shortly before 12 o'clock—I went away for about an hour—when I came back I saw the prisoners surrounding the prosecutor; they had their backs to me—there is a lamp there which threw a light on them—I knew Moran by name before—I did not mention his name at the police-court. Re-examined. I have no doubt as to the prisoners.

CORNELIUS MOYNEHAM (Policeman W 275). I took Ryan into custody on 25th March, and charged her—she said she had been drinking with the prosecutor, but had not had any of his money—there was a sixpence on her.

PATRICK GILMARTY (Policeman W 400). I was with Sullivan in Currey Street, and watched the house with him—when it closed the prosecutor and Ryan and Dineen came out and went to the Waterman's Arms—they went into the private bar—Moran came out of the public bar and went into the private bar—he came out in a couple of minutes and went back to the public bar—Dineen came out and Moran came out afterwards—I left the place and came back and saw all the prisoners and the prosecutor—the prisoners had the prosecutor jammed up against the wall, and some had their hands in his pockets—I was 40 or 50 yards off—the prisoners ran away—I caught Daly—she said "I have not got the money; Ryan and Dineen have got the money if you take them "—I had known Moran long previously—I took him into custody at 10.30 p.m. on Sunday, the 26th March—after the remand I told him I should take him into custody for stealing 25s. from the prosecutor—he said said "All right; I know all about it. I will go with you quietly if you don't knock me about. "

Cross-examined by MR. PURCELL. This was in a beerhouse at Nine Elms, about 300 yards from the Waterman's Arms—Sullivan and I had a perfect view of him when he came out of the Waterman's Arms—I was on the opposite side when I saw them surrounding the prosecutor—I was about 30 or 40 yards off—it is a kind of cross road—the public-houses were all closed then—I heard cries of "Police!"

By the COURT. I did not catch Moran, because he ran away directly he caught sight of us, and ran into his house.

The Prisoners' Statements before the Magistrate. Ryan says: "I didn't have any of his money. I was only drinking with him, and have done so before. He spent 4s. 2d. in drink with us." Dineen says: "I am innocent of his money or anything of his. I never saw him before and was never in his presence before." Origin says: "I have nothing to say. If the prosecutor can recognise me as having seen me before, let

him do so. "Daley says: "Griffin and I, at about half-past 12 o'clock, met a young man, who told me my brother was locked up. I heard something, and ran up, and saw the prosecutor and Ryan and Dineen, but what they were doing I don't know. The policeman came up, and took me. I can get a character for six years. Moron says: " I have witnesses to prove that I was in bed at the time, and Sullivan, whenever meet him, tells me he must have me. As late as two months ago he said he would give me six months."

NOT GUILTY .

 

GEORGE PULLEN, Theft > pocketpicking, 23rd October 1837.

 

2264. GEORGE PULLEN was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of October, 1 handkerchief, value 5s. to the goods of Joseph Harper, from his person.

JOSEPH HARPER . I live in Northampton-terrace, City-road. On the 6th of October I was going down Pentonville-hill—I felt a tug and missed my handkerchief—I turned, and saw the prisoner running with it—I followed—he was stopped by a policeman and dropped it.

MICHAEL SULLIVAN (police-constable N 256.) I heard a cry of "Stop thief;" saw the prisoner running, and stopped him—I did not see him drop this.

JOHN FARROW (police-constable N 167.) At half-past ten o'clock that evening I saw the prisoner run down Collin-street—I turned the corner, and my brother officer had stopped him—I found this handkerchief dote against the wall, near where he was stopped—no one could have dropped it but him.

Prisoner. I hope you will forgive me this time—this is my first offence

(The prisoner received a good character.)

GUILTY . Aged 18.— Confined Six Months; Six Weeks Solitary.

 

 

Ordinary's Account, 25th October 1706.
Reference Number: OA17061025

The ORDINARY of NEWGATE his Account of the Behaviour, Confession, and last Speech of Mr . Roger Lowen, who was Executed on Friday the 25th of October 1706, at Turnham-Green, for the Murther by him committed there, on the 20th of Sebtember last, upon the Body of Mr . Richard Lloyd.

AT the Sessions held at Justice-Hall in the Old-Baily, on Wednesday the 16th and Thursday the 17th Instant, Six Persons received Sentence of Death, viz. Four Women for Shop-Lifting an Old Man for Robbing a House, and the Gentleman above mentioned, for Murther. This last is the only Person now order'd for Execution; two of the Women being respited upon their Pregnancy, and the other two, with the Old Man, reprieved by the QUEEN's gracious Mercy; which the Lord grant they may improve as intended.

After their Condemnation I visited them twice every day, and on the last LORDS-DAY, the 20th instant, I preached to them, both in the Forenoon and Afternoon, upon part of the Gospel for the Day, viz. Matt. Chap 18. the former part of the 34th Verse. And his Lord was wroth, and delivered him to the Tormenter.

Which Words led me to the opening of the Parable, whereof they are a part. In which Parable our Blessed Saviour teaches us to forgive Injuries, and by no means seek for Revenge; but on the contrary be ready to repay ill turns with good ones; To love our Enemies; To bless them that curse us; To do good to them that hate us, and pray for them who despitiflly use us and persecute us, This is his express command Matt. 5. 44. By which we are let to understand how much, yea how indispensable we are bound always to entertain a good Will in our Hearts: Always to have a Spirit of Love and Charity towards all Men; Christ shewing us particularly in the Text, the Severe Punishment of that Bankrupt, that hard-hearted Servant therein mention'd, who having had no Mercy on his Fellow, had likewise, upon that account, no Mercy shew'd to him. He had angred and incens'd his Lord against him, by his Iuhumanity and Cruelty towards another: And so was order'd to condign Punishment. His Lord was wroth (Saith the Text) and deliver'd him to the Tormenters.

That we may know the right meaning of this; How far it reaches, and how much every man that wants Christian Love is concern'd in the Parable before us, we have the Application of it made very plainly in the Words immediately following the Text; in which we are told, That God will not forgive the Sins of those Persons, who do not from their hearts forgive them that have done them injury.

From which it evidently appears, That if we are oblig'd to have so much Love and Charity for our Neighbours, as to pardon freely, and entirely all the wrong we may have received from them; it is without doubt, I almost said, much more, our Duty to keep ourselves from doing any hur to such as never were hurtful to us; but shew'd themselves of a peaceable and quiet Disposition.

I would desire every one that hears me to let this sink into his heart; To consider seriously and without partiality whether he has not been guilty of the Breach of Christian Love: And whether he has not gone so far in that Breach as to have harm'd the Harmless and injured the Innocent. And when he finds he has done so; let him be advised to make what amends and Preparation he can, and speedily repent and return to a right mind; lest he provoke God's Wrath to such a degree, as to draw down Vengeance upon him, and he be deliver'd, not only to a Temporal, but to an Eternal Death; Not only to the Executioner here, but to the Tormenter hereafter; i. e. to the Devil, and all the Griefs and Pains, Racks, Tortures and Torments of Hell.

Now, what those Torments are, You may do well to think and consider, that so the serious thoughts and due Consideration thereof may through God's Grace and Mercy, effectually affright you into the happy avoiding of them.

The Torments of Hell into which the Cruel, the Merciless, and all other Sinners shall be adjudged, unless they repent, are of such a Nature, as all the the conceived Torments and Miseries of this World put together cannot come up to them, nor fully expresse them. But the Scripture condescending to our own apprehensions, is used to represent them to us under those Emblems and Metaphors, that are most proper to convey the horror of them into our Minds, and make us sensible that they are great and intolerable indeed.

1. Eternal Darkness,

2. Unquenchable Fire.

3. The Worm never dying.

4. Bonds, Chains, and Fetters that cannot be broken.

5. The Company of horrid Fiends and Devils.

6. Bitter Weeping and Wailing, and Gnashing of Teeth.

These are the Things by which the Torments of Hell are describ'd to us in the Gospel: And much greater, yea infinitly greater they are, than any notion we can have of them in this World. They are inexpressible and unconceivable. Who can comprehend the Meseries of the Damned, both as to their Pain of Loss, and their Pain of Sense?

In those two consists their dreadful Punishment: And they seem to be both pointed at in the Text.

I. The Wrath of God, by which he excludes and banishes them for ever from his Beatifick Presence. This is the Pain of Loss.

II. The Delivering of them to the Tormenters. This is the Pain of Sense.

On these two Heads I inlarged, and concluded the Whole with a particular Exhortation and Application to the Condemned, who were attentive.

Roger Lowen, who is the melancholy Subject of the following Account, was a German Gentleman about 40 years of age born (as he told me) at Hanover, and brought up in the Lutheran Church. He said, that he had been a Gentleman of the Querry to the late Duke of Zell; and that before he was entertain'd in that Service, the Duke (in consideration of his Father, that was his Huntsman) sent him into France to learn his Exercises, at his Highness's Charge. He spoke French very well, and it was that Language in which I frequently conversed with him, and he made his Confession to me; which was to this effect; viz. That he had not lived according to that Knowledge he had in Religion, and that (like many other Gentlemen, who mind nothing but the sinful Pleasures of this present Life, he had been very loose and extravagant. He readily confess'd that he had assaulted, and for a long time before design'd to kill Mr . Richard Lloyd; but for a great while before his Tryal and even some time after it, he seem'd to doubt very much of that Gentleman's Death; saying, that it was impossible he should have dy'd of of the Wounds he gave him. But when he was at last convinc'd, that he was really dead; then he appeared to be sensible that he had committed a very base and heinous Crime, and express'd great Sorrow for it. And this was so much the more afflictive to his now awaken'd Mind, by how much he consider'd the enormity of that bloody Fact, both as to the Nature of it, and the manner of his committing it; and withall the Unreasonableness of that Jealousy which had prov'd the unhappy occasion of it. After his Condemnation he seem'd to apply himself in good earnest to his Devotions; in which he was principally directed by two Reverend Divines of his own Church and Nation, viz. Mr. Ruperti and Mr. Idzardi, who did (together with me) labour to make him sensible that the Crime for which he was justly to die, was both in it self, and in the heinous Circumstances attending it, most base, barbarous and inhumane, and required a degree of Repentance proportionable to the height of that Stain and Guilt which it had brought upon his Soul. And therefore had great need of the Blood of Christ to wash him clean, and of God's extraordinary Help and Mercy, (which he ought to implore) if ever he expected to avoid the Eternal Wrath and Vengeance of the Just Judge of the whole World. He acquiesced in all that was said to him on this Account, and desired our Prayers for him; That God would be graciously pleased to forgive him both this crying bloody Sin, and all his former Wicked Acts of Pride, Lewdness and Debauchery; all the Errors, Follies, and Vices of his mispent Life, and his Neglect of Religious Duties; for which (he said) he heartily begg'd God's Pardon, and theirs whom he had any was offended.

At the Place of Execution, where he was attended, not only by me, but by those two Worthy German Ministers, who had constantly visited him while under Confinement, he deliver'd me a Paper containing his Last Speech to the World. Which Paper being in the German Tongue, I have got it translated into English, as follows.

It is already known to the World for what reason I am now brought to this Place, and am to suffer this shameful Death, viz. for my having Shed innocent Blood. I do acknowledge the Fact, and confess my Fault, and rest satisfy'd of the just Sentence past upon me; it being agreeable to the Laws of the Land, and the Command of God, That Whosoever shadeth Man's Blood, by Man shall his Blood be shed, for God has made Man after his own Jmage. I was born of honest and Christian Parents; my Father was an Englishman, and my Mother a German: I was educated from my Youth in the Protestant Religion. I declare before God and Man, That I always had an abhorrence and aversion to Actions of this kind, and have taken great care in all the Course of my Life to avoid them: And though I often had the

opportunity of taking away the Life of my Adversaries in ungodly Duels and Quarels; yet, I take God to Witnass, as a dying Man, I never was guilty of any Murther before this, for which I justly suffer. I am therefore the more grieved now, that I have been moved to so great a Passion, as to study Revenge, by the Instigation of the Devil and Sinfull Jealousy, which made me think (as I was perswaded by Mr. Crusius) that my Wife was marry'd in my absence with the Deceased. This is the unhappy thing th brought me to the Commission of this horrid Sin, which I heartily bewail with tears; and I do submit to my just Punishment. I am deeply sensible how greatly I have offended Almighty God; and therefore humbly implore his Pardon and Forgiveness, and that my Sinfull Soul may be washed from my Sins in the Blood of Sprinkling, that precious Blood shed by my Redeemer, which speaks better things than the Blood of Abel: And having the Promises from the Word af God, and his own Oath, That whensoever a Sinner truly repents and turns to him, he is willing to receive hlm and to forgive him, herein is the only Hope and Comfort of my departing Soul. I likewise humbly beg the Pardon of her Most gracious Majesty Queen ANN (whom God bless) and publickly ask Pardon of the Widow of the Deacesed Mr. Lloyd, as I have done already by a Letter which I have left unsealed with Mr. Rup. Minister at the Savoy &c. to send it to her, hoping she will (as a Christian) forgive me, as we all hope for Mercy and Forgiveness from God, through the Blood of Christ. In like manner I ask Pardon of my dear Wife, which has been many ways injured by this sad Occasion; and I sincerely declare that I am fully satisfy'd of her Innocence, and that I was jealous without a Cause; And I do not in any respect ascribe to her the Cause of my Misfortune. I truly love her, and assure the World that I have never been marry'd to any other Woman; and I pray heartily for her Prosperity and Happiness both of Soul and Body. Lastly, I desire all good People for God's sake earnestly to pray for the Salvation of my poor Sonl; and I exhort all to take Warning by my sad Misfortune, That they would not give way to Jealousy, Anger, Revenge, or such like Passions; but resist the Temptations of the Devil, the World and the Flesh, with constant and devout Prayer to God, and forgive their Enemies, and pray for them. All which I heartily and sincerely do, as I hope God will forgive me for Christ's sake.

ROGER LOWEN.

After Mr. Lowen had written this his Last Speech in order to his delivering it to me, as he did, at the Place of Execution; he had the great comfort to receive an Answer to his Letter therein mention'd; in which Mrs. Lloyd shew'd so much Christian Charity as to signify to him, That she forgave him, and pray that God would forgive him also, and have Mercy upon his Soul.

This is all the Account here to be given of this Dying Gentleman, by

PAUL LORRAIN, Ordinary of Newgate.

Friday, October 25. 1706.

††† Whereas some Persons take the Liberty of putting of Sham-Papers, pretending to give an Account of the Malefactors that are Executed; in which Papers they are so defective and unjust, as sometimes to mistake even their Names and Crimes, and often misrepresent the State they plainly appear to be in under their Condemnation, and at the time of their Death. To prevent which great Abuses, These are to give Notice, That the only true Account of the Dying Criminals, is that which comes out the next Day after their Execution, about 9 in the Morning, the Title whereof constantly begins with these Words, The ORDINARY of NEWGATE his Account of the Behaviour, &c. In which Paper (always Printed on both sides the better to distinguish it from Connterfeits) are set down the Heads of the several Sermons' Preach'd before the Condemned: And after their Confessions and Prayers, and Atestation thereto under the Ordinary's Hand, that is, his Name at length; and at the bottom the Printer's Name, Dryden Leach; which if the Readers would but observe, they would avoid those scandalous Cheats so constanly impos'a upon them.

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ROBERT DEWAR, Deception > forgery, 10th December 1783.

Reference Number: t17831210-59

56. ROBERT DEWAR, otherwise DEWARS, otherwise DEEWAR , was

indicted, for that he, on the 15th of July last, did falsly and feloniously make, forge, and counterfeit, and cause and procure to be falsely made, forged, and counterfeited a certain will and testament, partly printed, and partly written, purporting to be the last will and testament of Shaw Fergussoon , devising to his brother, John Fergussoon , all his wages, and appointing him executor; and which said forged will was dated the 22d of July, 1780, with intention to defraud our Sovereign Lord the King . A second count for uttering the same with the like intention. A third and fourth counts the same as the first and second, with intention to defraud Isaac Barre , Esq. And a fifth and sixth counts, with intention to defraud Donald Farquharson .

Mr. Silvester of Councel for the Prosecution, thus opened the Case.

Gentlemen of the Jury, this is an indictment for the crime of forgery, and before this offence could be carried into effect, the person committing it must also have been guilty of the crime of perjury, for he must have sworn he was the executor under that will, by which means he obtained the probate. Some time since, a man of the name of Farquharson died; the prisoner by some means heard, that enquiries were making for his executor, for there was a great deal of wages due to him. That gave the prisoner the idea of setting up a will; he immediately went to the Commons, and there produced a will in the name of Shaw Furgussoon ; he then obtained from the Pay Office, at Chatham, twenty-four pounds, ten shillings and six-pence, as wages due to the deceased: but to avoid any enquiry that might be made of him, he then produced a power of attorney, made from the said John Fergussoon , to him, Robert Dewar ; there he produced the will and the power of attorney, and he actually received the sum of twenty-four pounds, ten shillings and six-pence. There was a further sum of eight pounds, ten shillings and sixpence due to the deceased at the Pay Office, in Broad-street, for serving on board the Charles-town; he there applied to a gentleman of the name of Giles, a navy agent, to receive those wages; Giles received the wages at the Office, but before he had paid it over to the prisoner, a man of the name of Donald Farquharson applied for the wages really due; he applied and produced letters of administration taken out to his brother, who died intestate. The prisoner when he came to receive the money was detained, and upon enquiry it was found out, that this man died intenstate, but never had any brother of the name of John. Gentlemen, it will be in proof to you, first of all, that the prisoner went to the Commons in the name of John Furgussoon , and obtained the probate of the will; then he applied to Chatham, in his own name of Robert Dewar , under a power of attorney from that supposed John Furgussoon , by which means he received that money; he also applied to Mr. Giles, by the name of Dewar, his real name, under that power of attorney. It will also be in evidence to you, that Donald Farquharson is the brother of the deceased, that the will is not the hand-writing of the deceased, and that he never had a brother of the name of John. Gentlemen, this is a complicated offence, involving in it, not only the crime of forgery, but the aggravated crime of perjury; and if the facts are proved to your satisfaction, I doubt not but you, by your verdict, will find the prisoner guilty of the offence charged against him in the indictment.

Court. As the prisoner has no councel, I must have the indictment to compare it with the will.

WILLIAM CLARKSON sworn.

I am a clerk in the Prerogative Office, I produce the original will from the Commons.

Do you know any thing of any probate being granted on that will? - I remember searching for it, and entering the name on the calender; Mr. Lushington's clerk came to me, and I entered it in the book.

To whom was the probate granted? - To the person whose name is there.

Do you know that person? - I do not.

Has that probate been called in? - Yes it has, and revoked by interlocutory decree.

Court. That is no evidence; this goes no further than that the probate of a will of which that is the original, was granted to a man that came with Mr. Lushington's clerk.

GEORGE SWEETENBURGH sworn.

I am clerk to Mr. Lushington, the prisoner at the bar applied to me about a will, I believe it was the 15th of July, it will appear by the jurata on the will, he applied to me in the name of John Furgurson , he said he had got a will to prove, I took the will and looked at it, and in the usual way I wrote the jurata at the back, he said he spelt his name Furgurson.

Did he take the usual oath? - He did, it was administered to him by Dr. Ducarrell.

Court. What is the name of the deceased on that will? - The name is spelt differently, Fergusoon.

What is the Christian name? - Shaw.

Is that the will that you have in your hand that he produced as the original will? - Yes.

What is wrote on the back? - It is only the description.

Who gave it you? - The prisoner gave it me, except two words that are written by the clerk (reads)

"Testator Shaw Furgursoon ,

"alias Farquharson, alias Furgusson,

"was late belonging to his Majesty's

"ship Roebuck, Charles Town

"and Providence, and died 16th April,

"1781." Probate has been granted on that will, and has been called in by act of Court.

(The act of Court produced by Mr. Clarkson.)

Court. Was citation served on the prisoner? - I do not know that it has, but it must of course.

Court. We cannot take that for granted,

(Reads.)

"Farquharson against Dewar."

(This is the certificate of the decree, it is entered short.)

"The parties being called and not appearing,

"the Judge on motion of the advocate,

"has by his interlocutory decree

"confirmed the admonition of Donald Farquharson ." - The name being spelt so very different after the probate had been granted, the brother got administration in the real name.

Court to Clarkson. What is that book? - It is a minute book.

Do you afterwards draw up a regular form of the Court's proceedings? - They are afterwards extended, they are registered on large folio paper, and bound up, but this is not entered yet; this is the minute of the sentence, it is the best and only proof we have at present.

The will read and compared with the indictment by the Court.

Signed

" Shaw Furgursoon ." Signed, sealed, published and declared, in the presence of James Styeels , Robert Dewar .

"15th July 1783, John Furgussoon , brother of the deceased, and sole executor, was duly sworn, &c. and that the deceased died

"and Col. Ducarrell . Testator Shaw Furgussoon proved at London, by the oath of John Furgussoon to whom administration was granted.

Captain GREGOR FARQUHARSON sworn.

Court to Mr. Sylvester. This evidence that you are now enquiring into is not evidence of the forgery, for Shaw Farquharson might leave this to a brother that is dead; this is confirmatory evidence.

Mr. Sylvester to Captain Gregor Farquharson . You are brother to Shaw Farquharson ? - I had a brother on board the Roebuck of the name of Shaw Farquharson .

What relations besides yourself are living now of that brother? - There is another brother Donald, and a sister.

Did he leave any children? - Neither wife nor child.

Court. Then he is intitled, if his brother died intestate, to a share of his wages as his personal representative; the will is an act containing an bequest to John Furgussoon, and to him alone, and afterwards appointing him sole executor, he is therefore certainly an intereste d witness.

Mr. Sylvester. My Lord he shall execute a release.

JAMES RUTHERFORD sworn.

Mr. Sylvester. Did you know a man of the name of Shaw Farquharson? - Yes.

Did you know that Gregor Farquharson ? - I cannot say I did, I knew Shaw Farquharson , he was a servant of mine.

What was his name? - Shaw Farquharson .

Do you know his hand-writing? - I have a letter in my pocket from him.

Have you seen him write? - Yes, many times, he lived a servant with me better than four years, ( looks at the will) this is not his hand-writing, I can take upon me to say; he went from me to the Roebuck, I have a letter in my pocket from him from Corke on board the Roebuck, he had been a voyage in her and returned again, but whether he went on board again I do not know.

Do you know Donald Fergusson ? - I do, he was at my house many times.

They were brothers? - He always called him his brother, I cannot say whether they were or not.

Court. Are you pretty clear that is not his hand-writing? - I am clear about it.

Donald Farquharson called into Court.

Mr. Sylvester. Is that the person you mean? - Yes it is, that is the person he always called brother.

Do you recollect how he spelt his name? - Yes.

How was it? - Farquharson,

Does that resemble this hand-writing at all? - Not at all that name is wrote with a small F. he always used a large one.

You think it is not in his hand-writing, and has no resemblance to it? - I think it is not, I am sure it is not.

PETER FARQUHARSON sworn.

You are no relation to Shaw Farquharson , I believe? - None.

Did you know the family? - That brother only.

Did you know Shaw Farquharson ? - Perfectly.

Did you know that man Gregor Farquharson ? - I only saw him a few times, I last saw Shaw Farquharson at New York on board the Roebuck, between Staten-Island and the main land, I have known them go as brothers for ten years.

Have you frequently seen him write? - I have.

Look at that (Looks at the will)? - No, I cannot think this to be any of his writing.

Is it part his hand-writing? - None at all as far as I can judge, it is neither spelt nor wrote like it.

GEORGE ARNOLD sworn.

I produce the Roebuck book, it is there spelt Shaw Ferguson .

Is there any other Shaw Ferguson in the Roebuck book? - There is no other Shaw Ferguson of any kind of spelling in the Roebuck book.

Court. Have you examined the book thoroughly? - I have looked every name through with great care, and there is no name of Shaw Ferguson but that one, there is no name that is like it.

The Remainder of this Trial in the next PART which will be Published in a few Days.

Old Bailey Proceedings front matter, 10th December 1783.

Reference Number: t17831210-59
THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS ON THE KING's Commission of the Peace, Oyer and Terminer, and Gaol Delivery for the CITY of LONDON; AND ALSO The Gaol Delivery for the County of Middlesex; HELD AT JUSTICE HALL in the OLD BAILEY, On Wednesday the 10th of DECEMBER, 1783, and the following Days;

Being the FIRST SESSION in the Mayoralty of The Right Hon. ROBERT PECKHAM , Esq; LORD MAYOR OF THE CITY OF LONDON

TAKEN IN SHORT HAND BY E. HODGSON, And Published by Authority.

NUMBER I. PART VI.

LONDON:

Printed for E. HODGSON (the Proprietor) And Sold by J. WALMSLAY, No. 35, Chancery Lane, and S. BLADON, No. 13, Pater-noster Row.

MDCCLXXXIII.

[PRICE SIX-PENCE.]

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS UPON THE

KING's Commission of the Peace, Oyer and Terminer, and Gaol Delivery for the CITY of LONDON, &c.

Continuation of the Trial of Robert Dewar .

Jury. Who writes the names in that book? - The Captain's clerk.

JAMES ENGLISH LAWTON sworn.

This is the Charles Town book, in which he died the 16th of April 1781, the name is Shaw Furgeson :

What ship did he come from? - From the Providence into the Charlestown.

Arnold. He was discharged from the Roebuck to the Providence the 17th of May 1780.

JASPER ALLEN sworn.

This is the Providence book.

Is there a man named Shaw Ferguson there? - Yes, it is spelt Ferquhoson, he came from the Roebuck the 23d of May 1780, to the Providence; there is no other Shaw Ferguson on board the Providence, he was discharged the 14th of July 1780, to the Charles Town frigate.

Lawson. He is entered here the 15th.

JAMES MALPAS sworn.

I am clerk to the treasurer of the navy, for paying seamens wages at Chatham.

Did you ever see the prisoner? - I cannot call to my mind that I have, I have paid so many thousands of pounds since, I cannot recollect: a person came to the Pay-Office by the name of Robert Dewar .

Court. I cannot admit any evidence of another person.

Mr. Sylvester. Do you know who you paid the money to? - I cannot recollect.

What entry did you make in your book?

Court. The entry is no evidence.

Mr. Fielding. You know the name?

Court. That will not do.

Mr. Fielding. He may say what he knows, and that may be carried into evidence as strong as can be by and by.

JOHN GILES sworn.

I am a navy agent.

Was you applied to at any time by the prisoner? - Yes, I was.

For what? - To receive some wages belonging to one Shaw Ferguson , for the Charles Town .

Had you any conversation with him? - Nothing particular, he only brought the necessary papers to receive the wages.

What papers? - The probate of Shaw Ferguson 's will, with the will annexed, and a power made to him by the name of Robert Dewar .

Is that the paper? - I cannot be particular to it, it was a power of attorney to one Robert Dewar ; he told me his name was Dewar, and that he had that from John Ferguson , who was executor to Shaw Ferguson : I received 8 l. 10 s. 6 d. the first time I applied; I hold the money still, because another probate appeared at that time.

Had you ever any conversation with him about the Roebuck? - No, never, only about the Charles-Town.

Court. For what purpose did the prisoner apply to you? - To recover for him the wages due to Shaw Ferguson , of the Charles Town : he said his name was Dewar.

Did you receive those wages for him? - Yes.

Jury. Do you know the person of the prisoner? - He is the same man that brought the papers to me, I have not the least doubt of it; I am very sure of it.

Did you ever see him before? - No.

GEGORY FARQUHARSON sworn.

(A release was produced to the Administrator in order to quality him for a witness.)

Court. Have you received any promise from Donald Farquharson to give you the release back again, after the tryal is over? - None at all.

Or to pay you the share not with standing? - None at all, nor would I take it.

Mr. Sylvester. What other brothers have you? - This is the only brother now alive; there were many brothers, but they are all dead in the service.

Have you any one of the name of John? - None, that ever came to maturity; I recollect one that died an infant.

Look at the will; is that at all like your brother's hand writing? - It is not at all.

Do you know of his being on board the other ship as well as the Roebuck? - Yes, he wrote to me.

Court. You must not tell us what he wrote.

Court to Mr. Sylvester. You should identify that power of attorney; how came it into your hands.

Giles. I delivered the power of attorney to Donald.

Court. Look at it. - That is the same signing.

Look at the witnesses? - I think to the best of my knowledge, it is the same paper: I believe it to be the same from my inspection of it at the time.

Court. You cannot, to be sure, upon memory, undertake to swear positively that it is the same, but you believe this to be the same? - Yes, I believe it to be the same.

Court. This appears upon the face of it, to have been executed by a man calling himself John Ferguson , before the Lord Mayor.

Court to Sweetenburgh. Be so good as to recollect back as distinctly as you can, the particulars that passed between the prisoner and you, when he first applied to you, and that was to procure probate of a will for him which will be produced? - Yes.

Did he apply to you at first as John Ferguson the executor, or as acting on his behalf? - He applied as the executor of the will; I am quite sure of that, otherwise he must have produced a power of attorney; I am very sure he produced none.

Can you trace the day on which he applied to you? - It appears by the jurata of the will, the 15th of July.

Court. This letter of attorney is not dated till the 4th day of September.

Court to Prisoner. Now is your time to make your defence.

Prisoner. I am deaf, I have not heard a word of what has been said.

( Here the learned Judge recapitulated the whole of the evidence aloud to the Prisoner.)

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I had two witnesses here but they failed me, as my trial did not come on last sessions; they knew this John Ferguson gave me these papers: I had but little acquaintance with him, I only saw him about February last; he said nothing to me then, but in about a fortnight afterwards he called on me; says he, Mr. Dewar, I have a brother dead in America, and he has wages due, and he said, he had been offered money to let a man administer, but the man could not stop till the money was paid; so he went away: I saw no more of him till I think it was the 22d or 23d of July: will you ask that gentleman Whether the man that gave that the will not a red coat on, or a frock on; he says it was me?

Court to Sweetenburgh. How was the fact? - The prisoner had a red coat on; he was alone.

PRISONER's DEFENCE CONTINUED.

That was the corporal belonging to the marines, a townsman and countryman of this John Ferguson 's, that had lent him the money to administer; his name was Cameron: John Ferguson is dead; he died the 14th of September last; and this Cameron and him were constantly together, and about a week after I came from Chatham, they came and brought me this probate, I had never seen them before, I would not take it: one of the Crimps said, you had better go and receive the money yourself; I said, I would have nothing to do with it; says he, be so good, when my money is received, to take the money and I will write to you to remit me some; I told him I would not, and Mr. Giles knows very well that he had it till the 1st day of September; it was on Monday I think, I called on him in the morning: I had a letter from this John Ferguson ; I called on him and said, have you received any money; says he no; says I, I am going to Chatham to night; then says he, take these papers with you, and receive the money: I took the papers along with me, and I received the money, twenty-four pounds, ten shillings, and sixpence, I received faithfully, and honestly I came home the same night, and John Ferguson he came to me, and I paid him part of the money: I told him there is an account between you and I: this corporal he came along with him, I appointed him to come on Friday and settle; he came on Friday; I was not; at home: he did not come any more till Monday, then he came about eleven o'clock, and he called my wife if I had any money for him; she said, she did not know, and she gave him a little money, and he staid and had some victuals: when I came home he was laid down on the bed, he said he was sick; he said he must go to his quarters, when he got up he could not stir or wag; he said he would not go home, he lived somewhere about Spitalfields, I got him a bed, I saw him in bed; the next morning I went to see how he was; I employed an eminent surgeon that lives down in Wapping, I employed a woman nurse and laundress and every thing I could get, and he lived till the next Monday, and he died; he had a sister, I went and told her and she came; he did not want too see her, she had affronted him some how or other, she went and brought a Roman priest to him, that was the first time that ever I knew he was a Roman or papist: after the priest was gone, I said, says I, John, I did not know you was a papist? says he, all our family are? says I, I am very sorry for it, I never had much liking to them in my life; if I had known you had been a papist I would have had nothing to say to you; he died on the Monday, and on the Wednesday he was buried: I took a thought within myself, as Mr. Giles had got the power of attorney and the administration, now this man is dead, these things are of no value, I will go and ask Mr. Giles for them: when I came to him he asked me to sit down; he said, says he, there has been a young man who says he is the brother of Shaw Ferguson ,

and this will to John Ferguson is a forgery; says I, I have lived forty-nine years in his Majesty's service, and never had a blemish in my lifetime, I said, if I get into trouble as I am not at all concerned in the affair, I will see the end of it, if it costs me my life; Says he, when will you call again; now it was not likely I should come again; by my own consent to see my prosecutor: I am a man that never robbed man, woman, or child: I am no more guilty of forgery or any thing of the kind, than any gentleman in this house.

Court to Giles. Is the circumstance he has related true? - A few words of it are.

After you told him this was suspected to be a forgery, did he afterwards appoint a time to come and meet the brother of Ferguson, and did he come? - Yes: I followed him, after I had received the money, I told him, if you come next Saturday I will endeavour to settle with you, and he came on the Friday following, says I, come tomorrow to my house, and he came accordingly.

Court to Giles. Did you know this man at all? - I never saw him before.

Jury. Was his coming to you voluntary? - Entirely voluntary.

Court to Arnold. When was Shaw Farquharson turned over from the Roebuck to the Providence? - On the 17th of May, 1780.

Court to Lawson. When did he pass from the Providence to the Charles Town ? - The 15th of July, 1780.

Court. He died on board the Charles Town , the 16th of April, 1781? - Yes, Robert at sea.

Are there any men on board the Charles Town of the name of James Styeels or Dewar?

Lawson. I do not find any such names either on that or the Roebuck.

Mr. Sylvester. Is there any on board the Providence? - No.

Court to Prisoner. Have you any witnesses to prove there was such a man as John Ferguson ?

Prisoner. Lord bless you, they are all his relations, there is his sister lives down in Wapping, she said, before the Lord Mayor, because I had scandalized her brother, that if she could, she would go to Tyburn and pull my feet down, there are people, I can prove, and I can bring the man and the woman that buried him; one Mr. Britain in Church Lane that buried him, and I went to church with him myself.

Court. You have no witnesses here to prove that? - No I have not, but I can get them if you will give me time; when this Donald Fergusson went to Mr. Giles's, when I went to wait on him there, he and I had some words, and so when he looked over the will, and saw this Shaw Ferguson was only Ferguson, and his name is Farquharson, he said, and Mr. Giles heard him, says he, this can not be the man, we had better let him alone, till we find out the certainty of it: He was gone almost an hour, and I sat with Mr. Giles, and he came back and brought a constable and sent me to the Compter. On the Sunday after I was there, there came an elder brother of this Farquharson, says he, I want to ask you a question, I am Donald Ferguson 's brother your prosecutor, says he, come in here, I went into the little room, says he, did you know one Shaw Ferguson belonging to the Roebuck; no, Sir, says I, says he, they are all fools together, for my brother Shaw Ferguson is not dead now, I have a letter I received from him: I have ten witnesses that can prove that.

Court. Who said so? - Gregor Farquharson ; I suppose I have ten witnesses in the Compter that heard it, and will take their oaths of it.

Gregor Farquharson . My Lord, shall I relate the story?

Court. Is what he says true? - Some words are, but not all.

Did you tell him that your brother Shaw Farquharson was not dead, but you received

a letter? - I told him I had not heard of my brother's death till I saw it in the newspaper.

Did you tell him that your brother was not dead? - No, I did not.

Or that you received a letter from him? - No, I did not.

Prisoner. I belonged to the army, I have a man here somewhere that was in the regiment along with me; I suppose I have one of the best of characters in the army ; I receive a pension from his Majesty's service; for forty-nine years and one month, I served my King and country, and now I am seventy-two years of age.

ROBERT RICE sworn.

I am a shoe-maker, I live in Great Montague Court, Little Britain; I knew the prisoner about two years, and during the time I knew him, he had an exceeding good character, no man could bear a better; I was discharged from the said company that he commanded five years last August.

The Jury withdrew for some time, and returned with a verdict

GUILTY , Death .

Tried by the first London Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Old Bailey Proceedings front matter, 10th December 1783.

Reference Number: t17831210-59
THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS ON THE KING's Commission of the Peace, Oyer and Terminer, and Gaol Delivery for the CITY of LONDON; AND ALSO The Gaol Delivery for the County of Middlesex; HELD AT JUSTICE HALL in the OLD BAILEY, On Wednesday the 10th of DECEMBER, 1783, and the following Days;

Being the FIRST SESSION in the Mayoralty of The Right Hon. ROBERT PECKHAM , Esq; LORD MAYOR OF THE CITY OF LONDON

TAKEN IN SHORT HAND BY E. HODGSON, And Published by Authority.

NUMBER I. PART VI.

LONDON:

Printed for E. HODGSON (the Proprietor) And Sold by J. WALMSLAY, No. 35, Chancery Lane, and S. BLADON, No. 13, Pater-noster Row.

MDCCLXXXIII.

[PRICE SIX-PENCE.]

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS UPON THE

KING's Commission of the Peace, Oyer and Terminer, and Gaol Delivery for the CITY of LONDON, &c.

 

 

 


THOMAS COURTNAY, Theft > theft from a specified place, 23rd November 1840.

Reference Number: t18401123-76

76. THOMAS COURTNAY . was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of November, at St. Giles-in-the-Fields, 10 shillings, and 1 10l. bank-note, the property of Mary Duggan, in the dwelling-house of Matthew Sullivan.

MARY DUGGAN . I am a widow, and lodge at Mr. Sullivan's, in Orange-court, Drury-lane. The prisoner lived in the two-pair front—I had a large chest, in which I kept my clothes and money, which I got permission from the prisoner to put into his room—I always kept it locked, and kept the key myself—the prisoner knew I kept my money in that chest—I showed it to him—on Sunday morning, the 8th of November, about half-past ten o'clock, I went and put 5s. into a purse along with the rest of the money in the chest—the money was safe then—I felt two sovereigns, about 1l. of silver, and three 10l. Bank of England notes—I did not look at them then, but I felt them—I had seen them about a week before—I put the purse back into the chest, and locked it as I thought, but I am not sure—I put the key into my pocket—the prisoner was sitting in the room at that time—on Tuesday morning, the 10th, I went again into the room and opened my chest—it was then unlocked—my purse had been opened, and lay at the top of the clothes—I had placed it at the bottom—one 10l. note, and about 10s. in silver was gone—the rest was there—the prisoner was not there then—I went down to the landlady, and said my money was gone, and the prisoner was taken into custody about half-past two that day.

ALICE SULLIVAN . I am the wife of Matthew Sullivan, the owner of the house; it is in the parish of St. Giles's-in-the-Fields. On the 10th of November, the prosecutrix came to me, took me to the prisoner's room, and showed me her chest—in consequence of what she said, I went to look after the prisoner, but could not find him then—he returned at two o'clock, not sober—I saw him go up stairs—I went to tell the prosecutrix and when I returned he was gone—I went to Mr. Wilson's at the corner of Drury-lane, and saw him there—I told him he had done a pretty thing for himself that morning, he had broken open Mrs. Duggan's box and taken her money—he said, "No, who can swear I have done it?"—he left the public-house, I followed him into Long-acre, and gave him into custody—when he was in the policeman's custody I saw his hand in his trowsers' pocket, and saw three sovereigns come, as far as I could see, from his hand on to the pavement—the policeman picked them up.

 

 

 

 

 

WILLIAM BOYCE . I am a policeman. On the 10th of November, I was on duty in Great Queen-street, and heard a cry of "Stop thief"—I saw the prisoner running, and took him—Mrs. Sullivan came up and charged him with having taken a 10l. note—as I took him down Bow-street, I saw him drop three sovereigns, which I picked up—I found 11s. 3d. on his person—while waiting at the police-court, he said nobody saw him take it—I asked him where he changed the 10l. note—he said he did

not know where, he was in liquor at the time—he said the 5l. note which Rustling found was taken in change of the 10l. note.

THOMAS RUTLING . I am a policeman. I saw the prisoner in a stooping position after he was searched—he was taken to a cell, and while he was absent I lighted a candle and found a 5l. note in the place where he had been—it was squeezed up in a very small compass—I opened it and showed it to him—he said, "Keep dark, and we will make it right"

Prisoner's Defence. I did not open the box.

GUILTY . Aged 48.—Recommended to mercy by the Prosecutrix.— Confined Six Months.

 

 

WM. WALTER MORTON . I am a gunmaker, of 8, Railway Approach, London Bridge—I know the prisoner as Thomas Walsh, of 12, Charles Street, Hatton Garden, but I did not know his address when he first dealt with me, not till six months ago—I have sold him Snider rifles and military arms from time to time-this is a copy extracted from my books of his dealings with me—the first was an ordinary fowling-piece in August, 1875; then three Warner carbines on 27th November, 1878, at 14s. each, 2l. 2s.; 18th December, 4 Warner carbines at 14s., and 8 more on 7th January, 1879; 16th April, 10 Snider rifles, with bayonets, at 16s. 6d. and a bull-dog revolver; 10th June, 1878, 29 short Sniders, with sword bayonets and in the same month 50 central-fire cartridges; 5th July, 1880, 10 Snider rifles, with bayonets, at 26s.; 9th July, 2 instructors; I cannot explain what they are as I should like, but they carry a smaller cartridge than is used with the gun; January, 1881, 12 Sniders, with sword bayonets, 80s.; 2nd January, 1882, 1,000 Snider cartridges., 5l., and 2,000 revolver cartridges, 4. 50 bore; 8th September, 2 instructors and 300 caps; 30th September, 600 cartridges, 4. 50 bore, and 1,500 Snider cartridges—Walsh purchased all those, and they were taken into

a cellar at No. 6, two or three doors lower down—they were always fetched—I once saw Walsh with a van when I went over the bridge with him—I did not see the carman—he always paid cash, except once—a tall, dark man, who appeared like a clergyman, came with him four or fire times; the prisoner did not tell me who the man was—-the man looked at the goods purchased—the prisoner did not tell me what he wanted the rifles, revolvers, and cartridges for, but he said that he was doing a Cape trade and dealing with yachts—yachts are armed, especially when they go to the Mediterranean—they were all new Enfield's—they were not converted—the stocks were perfect when I sold them.

Cross-examined. The rifles had the crown, and the Tower mark on them—it is usual for dealers to put that on; it is almost like a trade-mark—they were marked on the lock-plate with the number and the year they were made—the butts were not marked A1, B1, &c.—I should not put the Grown or Tower mark on a best Snider, I should simply put my name—dealers have private marks of their own.

Re-examined. Walsh gave me this I O U (produced)—it is his writing—I put the number of some of the cartridges in this account—this "1 m," on 9th July, stands for "1 mille," that is, 1,000. (The number of cartridges in the list cast up to 24,000)—I gave him a card to get cartridges from Eley, in addition to those I sold him—he is a cartridge manufacturer.

By MR. BIRON. In the last part of my account there is "1,000 Snider cartridges 94 D"—I charge 10s. 6d. per 100 retail—in the next page I charge only half, 5l. 10d. for 2,000, that is because I had a number "seized under the Explosives Act, and I was glad to get rid of some.

EDWARD NEALER . I have been six years shopman to Mr. Morton—I have known the prisoner four years as a customer, and up to six months ago buying rifles, pistols, and cartridges—I knew him as T. Walsh, but did not know his address—he always fetched the things away himself—they were carried into Mr. Fuller's cellar, and packed there by our boy, Izzard—I have seen a van with the name of Johnson on it.

FRANK IZZARD . I was formerly in Mr. Morton's service, I went in May, 1880, and left in December, 1881—I know the prisoner as a customer in the name of Thomas Walsh; I took rifles from the shop to Fuller's cellar, where they were packed in the prisoner's presence—the barrels were taken off the stocks, but they were not cut in my presence—I saw one which was cut in the shop, it came for repairs—about 20 were packed in one case, with bayonets complete, and the prisoner came there with a van and took them away—Lovelock is not the driver I have seen—I don't know where they were taken—I remember a young man with a dark moustache coming once with the prisoner, he took no part in the purchase, but on one occasion he took some cartridges away in a carpet bag and some on his shoulder in a parcel—I gold these instructors and 300 caps to him, he paid for them and took them away.

Cross-examined. I never saw an older man dressed as a clergyman come.

JOHN WILLIAM CROOK . I am the receiver appinted with respect to Mr. Newby's partnership—I was appointed in December, 1880, but I took charge in July, 1880—1 was aware that a large quantity of rifles were stored at Blenheim Works, Hoxton, and at Suffolk Street, Southwark—George Wenham would deliver goods if sales were effected—I sold 500 Snider rifles to McKenzie Brothers, on July 19th, 1880; 500 in January, 1881, and

500 on February 5th, and in June, 1881, 500 to Mr. Watson through Mr. Pinner—in January, 1881,1 sold some Snider cartridges to McKenzies, and in December, 1881, 10,000 cartridges were sold by Wenham—I made out the delivery orders at once; this (produced) is McKenzie's order to Purvis to deliver 500 Sniders—bayonets were attached to all the rifles, the price was 14s. 6d., including everything—they came to 1,450l.

JAMES CHRISTIE MCKENZIE . I am a merchant, of 82, Mark Lane, and trade as McKenzie Brothers—I occasionally deal in rifles, ammunition, and bayonets—I had a customer, who dealt in the name of J. R. Armstrong, Anderton's Hotel, Fleet Street—I first saw him about August, 1879—I dealt with him for long and short Sniders, with sword-bayonets for the short ones and triangular for the long ones—on 4th February, 1881, I sold him 500 long Snider rifles at 15s. 6d. making 357l. 10s.; he paid for them in cash mm notes, against the delivery order (produced)—it was signed J. Courtin, at Armstrong's request—on 28th January, 1881,1 sold to Armstrong 500 long Sniders at 15s. 6d. and gave him this delivery order for 300. (The second order for 200 was missing.) On 28th June, 1881, I sold him 500 rifles, for which he paid 362l. 10s.—I purchased them through Mr. Watson and made out the invoice to J. Courtin, at Armstrong's request—also sold Armstrong 200 rifles and 25,000 cartridges, on August 27th, 1879, and the invoice was made out in the name of Signor S. Diego—that was our first sale—Armstrong gave me the name of Diego and Co. on several occasions—Armstrong was about my height, full faced, with a gingery short stubbly beard and moustache and whiskers—he always paid me in cash; I never had any other address from him.

ALFRED BINGHAM . I am in Mr. Crook's employ—shortly before Christmas, 1881, I delivered 17 cases of rifles to the prisoner at the Blenheim Works each containing 20 rifles with bayonets—he came there with a delivery order and took them away in Johnson's van—Lovelock was the car-man—I had seen the prisoner on two or three occasions at the Blenheim Works and at Southwark Street, and knew him.

Cross-examined. I acted on the order quite disregarding who he was or what he was.

GEORGE WENHAM . I am foreman to Mr. Crook; I have known the prisoner about four years—I have seen him at Eagle Wharf Road, South-wark Street—in July, 1880, I was in Mr. Newby's employ and saw Walsh there, before Mr. Crook was appointed—I have known him take long Snider rifles with bayonets away from Mr. Newby's—in June, 1881, some rifles were lying at the Blenheim Works to Mr. Crook's orders, and the prisoner came two or three months afterwards with Johnson's van, and I delivered to him eight cases of rifles and bayonets, with 20 rifles in each—the stocks were not cut—17 other cases containing 20 each were delivered by Bingham next day—I would not say that it was after June—I also sold the prisoner 10,000 cartridges; the whole sum was 16l. 10s.—he gave me a 5l. Bank of England note as a deposit—on 7th February, 1881, he called at 106, Southwark Street, and produced a delivery order from McKenzie Brothers for 500 rifles with bayonets, and I delivered a number that day, this is his receipt (For 10 cases of 20 each for Mr. Crook; signed J. J. W, Feb. 7th.) He came again on the 19th, and received 15 more cases, making 500 rifles and bayonets—he signed the book in a way which I

cannot read—on 28th April he came again and received 25 cases containing 500 long Snider rifles and bayonets, to the order of McKenzie Brothers, and gave me this receipt. (Dated April 28th, and signed J. J. W. pro Diego and Co. or Disgo and Co.) Whatever the signature is the prisoner wrote it—he also had I think 10,000 cartridges to fit the rifles in December, 1881. EDWARD HENRY NEWBY. I traded as an Army contractor in 1881—I had a warehouse at Blenheim Works and another in the basement of 106, Southwark Street—at the dissolution of my partnership with Mr. Crook, in December, 1880, a receiver was appointed—my first transaction with the prisoner was 25th June, 1879, when I sold him 20 long Snider rifles and bayonets, price 17l., and he paid me in bank notes—he gave his address, 36, Percy Street, "West—the second transaction was on 16th April, 1880; two cases of long Sniders and bayonets at 16s., 32l., and on 2nd July, 20 long snidereand bayonets, 16l., and on 20th July, 20 more, making 120—the rest of the transactions took place with the receiver.'

Cross-examined. I did not see Armtsrong, and never had anything to do with him—I only saw the prisoner.

Re-examined. He got the goods from my place of business, Chatham Buildings, New Bridge Street.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

DIED. April? - At Pallace (Kerry) Mr. J. James, son of the late Raleigh James, Esq of Limerick - A few days ago, at Isle, Co. Kerry, in her 108th year, Margaret Donoghue, whose constitution and bodily strength has enabled her to walk three miles to a neighbouring chapel on every Sunday for the last 20 years.


Limerick, March 25. - Monday night the 16th inst eight villains broke into the house of Mr. Michael Lanagan near Cahir, laid him on the floor, put straw under and over him, the set fire to it, and tortured him in such a manner that he confessed he had 150 guineas, which he handed them, but was so shockingly burned that he died on Friday; and on Sunday another house was robbed in the same neighbourhood.
Sunday the Hon. Mr. Justice Day, and the Right Hon. Mr. Prime Serjeant Daly, Lords Justices of Assizes for the Munster Circuits, arrived in town, and on Monday they opened their respective Commissions.

By the Lord Lieutenant and Council of Ireland,
A PROCLAMATION
CORNWALLIS.
WHEREAS we have received information upon oath that on the Night of the 17th day of March, inst. William Brandon, Shepherd to Michael Burke, Esq of Spring-Garden, in the County of Galway, was barbarously murdered at or near Spring-Garden, aforesaid, by some evil minded person or persons unknown, who fired a gun or pistol shot at the breast of the said William Brandon, and also nearly severed his head from his body.
Now we the Lord Lieutenant and Council of Ireland being fully determined, as far as in us lies, to bring the perpetrators of said inhuman murder to speedy and condign punishment, do by this our Proclamation publish and declare, that if any person or persons shall within the space of Six Months next after the date of this our Proclamation, discover the persons concerned in the said murder, so as that he, she, or they be apprehended and convicted thereof, such person or persons so discovering shall receive as a Reward the sum of ONE HUNDRED POUNDS for each and every of the persons who shall be so discovered, apprehended, and convicted of the said murder.
And we do hereby publish and declare, that if any Person or Persons concerned in the said Murder (the Person or Persons who actually committed the same only excepted) shall, within the time aforesaid, discover his, or their Accomplice or Accomplices, so as that he, she, or they may be apprehended and convicted thereof, such Person or Persons shall not only receive the said reward, but shall also receive his Majesty's most gracious and free pardon for the said Murder.
And we do hereby strictly charge and command all Justices of the Peace, Mayors, Sheriffs, Bailiffs, and all other his Majesty's loving subjects, to use their utmost endeavours to bring the said Offenders, and every of them, to speedy and condign punishment.
Given at the Council Chamber in Dublin the Thirty-First Day of March, 1801.

Clainricarde, Shannon, Donoughmore, Kilwarden, G.S. Frankfort, D. Latouche, J. Monck, Mason.
GOD SAVE THE KING.

 

SOCIETY
FOR PROMOTING the COMFORTS of the POOR.
THE Society will give a Premium of TWENTY GUINEAS for the best ESSAY on a GENERAL PLAN for providing for the Poor of this Kingdom - Also, TEN GUINEAS, for the next best Essay on the same subject.
Also, a MEDAL or THREE GUINEAS, at the choice of the Person applying, to the Author of the best ESSAY on any of the following subjects :--
1st. Advice to a Cottier having an Acre and Half of Land.
2d Method of Managing a coarse Kitchen garden.
3d. Management and Culture of Potatoes.
4th Advice to the Poor in Towns.
N.B. The Essays to be approved by the General Committee, and enclosed to WM. DISNEY, Esq, No.5, Hume-street, before the 1st of January, 1802 - March 6, 1801.

 


Faulkners Dublin Journal May 1764

 

GAMBLER, the Property of Mr. Hugh O'Neill, will cover Mares this Season, at Bettystown, near Drogheda, at one Guinea a Mare and a Shilling to the Servant; he is 14 Hands 3 Inches high, of great Strength and vast Bone, and five Years old, a brown Bay, and free from all Blemishes whatsoever. He is own Brother to Mr. Watson's Filly, which won the Subscription of 240 Guineas for three Years old last October at Newmarket, and is thought the best Mare of her Years in England; he was got by Young Cade, his Dam by Old Traveller, his Grand Dam by Hip, (a Son of the Cunvin bay Barb) his Great Grand Dam by Snake, a Son of the Lyster Turk, out of Darcy Royal Mare, Mr. Yever's Mare called Yorkshire Jenny, which won the great Subscription last Season at York, for five Years old, with great Ease, and won the King's Hundred Guineas this last April last at Newmarket, was got by Cade, her Dam by Old Traveller. Good Grass for Mares, and proper Care, at 2s. 2d per Week.

 


Feb 8th 1817


LIMERICK, JAN. 5.- On the night of the 26th ult. as John Shouldice, the Permanent-Serjeant of the Castleotway corps of yeomanry, was on his return from Nenagh, where he had been on some business connected with the Sessions, he was waylaid about the hour of eight o'clock in the evening, and within a quarter of a mile of his own dwelling, and fired at from behind an hedge with such accuracy of aim, that six slugs were lodged in his back. - In tracing back for any cause for this diabolical act of vengeance, we think that Shouldice was one of the persons who helped to defend Wallis's house - Limerick Chronicle
On Thursday night last, a large party of men armed and mounted, attacked and broke into the house of a respectable farmer named Mally, about two miles from Newport, and forcibly carried off his daughter, after abusing and beating the father and mother. She was thrown across a horse, held by two men, and carried to Gouge, near Castle-Connell, almost naked, her brother and some friends, who pursued were beaten off. The next day Mr. Robert Going, with a party of the army, made a close search for her without success, as she had been removed to some other place, but on Saturday evening the Rev. Mr. Crampton was so fortunate as to recover her, and bring her to his house where, from the ill treatment she received, she was obliged to remain till yesterday, when her sent her home with her father, escorted by a party of soldiers to a place of safety. Mr. Waller, of Castle-Waller, has used every effort to investigate this outrage, and having obtained information against some of the principals, we have no doubt from the activity of these Magistrates, they will ere long be brought to condign punishment.


Travelling between Holyhead, London, Cheltenham, &c. &c.
ROYAL HIBERNIA HOTEL, HOLYHEAD.
THOMAS MORAN, Proprietor.

RESPECTFULLY informs the Nobility and Gentry of the United Kingdom, and of his Native Land (Ireland) in particular, that he has established the above will all its necessary accommodations, upon principles which, while they have essentially served the Public, have secured to him the zealous Patronage of those who have once favoured his Hotel with a visit.
As by setting out upon the plan of such moderate charges as barely support his system of comfort, the excellence of his Larder and Cellar, as also his Public and Private Travelling accommodations, MORAN has already vanquished all the efforts of the previous Monopoly at this great Thoroughfare, and consequently done away with most of its injurious effects to the Public, as it effected both the Hotel and travelling departments; so be a steady adherence to such system - MORAN looks forward with respectful confidence to the only remuneration he aspires to, namely the small but steady profit arising from Public favour, and the reputation of his Hotel, Livery Stables, Posting accommodation and the Prince of Wales Light Post Chaise, which starts daily from his Hotel from 10 to 12 o'Clock, according to the arrival of the Irish Packet, and runs through the New Capel Cerrig Road, to Shrewsbury, (from whence certain conveyances start at all hours to every Town of note in the Kingdom,) Birmingham, Oxford, and London. As also the Hibernia Coach, to Cheltenham and Bath, three days a week, and is the only Coach direct from Holyhead to Cheltenham.
Note - The Saving to the Traveller caused by Moran's system, will be provided at the Bar and Coach Office, of the Royal Hibernia Hotel, which possesses another convenience, of much weight, where Ladies and Children are concerned, namely, his Hotel is near to the water-side, and the mooring of the Packets, and it also nearly adjoins the Custom House, where Moran personally attends, to get out the luggage of such Ladies and Gentleman, as may be fatigued, and unable to attend themselves.
Holyhead, Jan.4, 1817.

 

Dec 1810

 

On Wednesday night, the 21st instant, Messrs.Laffan and White, Acting Inspectors for the district of Ennis, left that town, accompanied by a party of the military, and proceeded to the neighbourhood of Schariff, where they detected five very extensive private distilleries, and after having destroyed an immense quantity of malt, pot-ale, singlings, and the utensils, returned to that town with the stills, heads, and worms, which they lodged in his Majesty's store; and also two men as prisoners, whom they surprised in one of the distilleries, and who are bound over by them before a Magistrate, to stand their trials at the next assizes for said county. The exertion of these officers in that county already, has had the most happy effects, by inducing a gentleman of respectability to take out license for a still of a large content in the town of Ennis, where there has not been one for many years. We sincerely hope that the Excise Officers throughout Ireland will now exert themselves to put down this baneful and abominable trade, which has so much tended to decrease the revenue of the country, the profits of the fair and honourable trader, and to contaminate the morals of the poor and innocent peasantry.

We have received the following account of a new outrage committed by those deluded men styling themselves Caravats :- The home of Mr.O'Ryan, of Ballycurkeen[?], was attacked on Sunday morning, about ten o'clock. Except Mrs.O'Ryan and one female servant, the remainder of the family were at Mass, and Mr.O'Ryan absent. The hall door being incautiously left open, three men, well armed, entered and proceeded directly to the parlour where Mrs.O'Ryan was, and threatened her with instant death if she made the least noise or resistance, and did not give up what fire-arms were in the house; she told them she did not know where they were, offering them at the same time the keys of the house to search for them, upon which they left the room, breaking open eight drawers, saying they would not lose time in trying to unlock them; they likewise forced open some desks and trunks. Whilst they were thus occupied, Mrs.Ryan went out of the house, and ran up the avenue, calling loudly for assistance, which, when the Caravats heard, they pursued her and forced her back, one of them holding his hand to her mouth to prevent her crying out; - they tore here clothes in forcing her back, swearing they would shoot her, which one of them was about to do, when prevented by another. They then searched the house more closely, when they found a case of pistols and some powder and ball, the rest of the arms having, a few days before, been sent to be repaired, which prevented them from falling into the hands of those ruffians. They went off in different directions; when going, they said they were from the county of Limerick, and that they would return again, as they knew there were more arms in the house.- Waterford Mirror.

On Tuesday last as three Valuators, accompanied by four Police men, were proceeding on some tithe business in the neighbourhood of Ardfinnan, the party was surrounded in the house of one Shee by a mob of upwards of fifteen villains with their faces blackened, and furnished with straw cravats, who murdered Arthur Mullowney, one of the Police men, by shooting him. It appears as if their vengeance was particularly directed against this man, it being upon his information that a fellow named Leamy is now confined in Conmel gaol upon a capital charge for firing at a Police man, at the time that Mr.Clutterbuck narrowly escaped being shot, in attempting to seize Leamy.- A person of the name of John Fennessy has been committed to Clonmel gaol, charged with being present, aiding and abetting at the above murder.

A few days since, two men armed entered an house in Carrick in the noon-day, and presenting a pistol at the head of two women, its only inhabitants, demanded the arms, threatening with the most vehement imprecations to put the women to death, in case of noise or resistance. The consequence is obvious; the only arms in the house, a carbine or firelock, they took off unmolested.

 

The Queen of France's Funeral.
London, Nov.27.

At nine o'clock yesterday morning, the service for the dead began at the Roman Catholic Chapel in Portman-square. The French Princes arrived at ten, the Foreign Ambassadors between eleven and twelve.
The coffin was placed in the middle of the chapel, covered with crimson velvet, and highly ornamented; in an escutcheon were the arms of France and Savoy, and the Crown of France was placed at the head; it was surrounded with 40 lighted tapers. At the head of the coffin stood the Duke d'Avery, as having the charge of the Crown; and near him Pere Elizee, Surgeon to her Majesty; at the foot next to the altar stood the Count de la Chatre, as Commissary of the King of France, and near him the Compte de Nantouillet, as Master of the Ceremonies. On the right on a row of raised seats were the French Princes, Monsieur the Duke D'Angouleme, the Duke de Berry, the Prince de Conde, and the Duke de Bourbon; and below them their respective officers. Mr.De Broval, we suppose, as representing the Duke of Orleans, sat on the left of the Princes. On the left of the coffin, and opposite to the French Princes, was another row of seats for the Foreign Ambassadors. Below them were the great dignitaries of the ancient French military and chivalric orders.
The service was performed by Mr.Dalbignac, Bishop of Angouleme; there were also present Mr.Talleyrand; Archbishop of Rheims, the Bishops of Sisteron, Digne, Nantes, Tarbes, Rhodez, Aire, Usez, Blois, and Montpelier.
The cards of admission for the abbey were simply for the "funeral of the Countess De Lille" and we cannot sufficiently praise the nice sense of propriety which dictated that distinction. From the Chapel to the hearse the coffin was borne by twelve Knights of St.Louis, and the pall supported by four Dames d'Honneur. The procession then began in the following order :

Thirteen men on horseback; a mute with feathers on horseback; a coach and six with the four Dames d'Honneurs - Mesdames la Duchesse de Pienne, la Duchesse de Coigny, la Comtesse de Naronne, and la Comtesse de Mesnard.
Another coach and six, with persons of the household.
Gardes du Corps of foot, headed by one of their Officers.
A mourner on a fully caparisoned horse, carrying on a cushion the Crown of France, covered with black crape.
The hearse drawn by six beautiful horses, and adorned with a profusion of plumes.

In the Chapel, the same ceremonial was observed as at St.Denis, and the cards of admission were for "The Funeral of the Queen of France."
Then followed the French Princes in mourning coaches and six, followed by the principal French Nobility.
After the mourning coaches, came that of his Royal Highness the Prince of Wales, drawn by six horses, and conducted by his Highness's state coachman, with three footmen and two pages; the coaches of all the Royal Dukes followed, according to their seniority; as also two coaches and six of the Marquis of Buckingham; those of the Marquis of Wellesley, of Mr.Perceval, and all the Ministers : those of the Foreign Ambassadors, and several English Noblemen and Gentlemen.
The Dean of Westminster, at the head of the Chapter, received the body at the entrance of the Church, the avenues and the aisles being guarded and lined by the battalion of Volunteers of St.John and St.Margaret's, commanded by Major Jones.- A requiem was sung by the full Choir, accompanied by the organ; and after the ceremony, the remains of the Princess were deposited in the same vault with those of the Duke of Montpensier, on the south-west side of King Henry VII's Chapel.

Dec 30th 1806


DIED.- At Cloney, near Newtownlimavady, on the 17th instant, Mr. Wm. Haslett, aged 75. - At Cork, Capt. Wm. Barry; he had served for nearly half a century with honour and reputation, first in the Saxon, afterwards in the Prussian, and finally in the British Army.- Mrs. Hodnett, relict of the Rev. Wm. Hodnett, of Carrymore, at the advanced age of 78 years.


We mention with sincere regret the death on the 7th inst of Jas. Beresford, Esq. the fifth son of the late Right Hon. John Beresford : he was a Midshipman on board the Phoenix, and while loosing the top-gallant-sail in chase of a Spanish frigate, he was unfortunately shaken off the yard by a heavy sea that struck the ship.
The Lord Chancellor Ponsonby continued his sittings in the Court of Chancery every day since the expiration of the late Michaelmas Term, until Wednesday last.


The Magistrates of Limerick have publicly stated that an unusual number of Foreigners and other Strangers had of late sojourned in that city and its liberties, some of whom there was reason to suspect of misleading many, by inciting them to attend those nightly meetings which have disturbed the peace of the country, and accordingly required all such Foreigners, &c. to appear before one of them, to satisfy them of their object in repairing to that city, or else they would be arrested.
The London Gazette of Tuesday contains an order of Council for continuing the bounties granted for the encouragement of seamen and landmen to enter into the Royal Navy, from the 31st of December, 1806, to the 31st December, 1807, with the exception that the rewards to persons procuring seamen and landmen are reduced as follows :- for each, Able Seaman three guineas; for each Ordinary Seaman, two guineas; and for each Landman, one guinea; together with the same allowance for travelling expences as before.

 

DECREES.

Margaret Connell, otherwise Goold, by John Agnew Connell, Esq. her Husband and next Friend, Plaintiff.
Sir Francis Goold, Bart; Sir Patrick O'Coner, Knt. and Others, Defendants.

PURSUANT to the Decree of His Majesty's Court of Exchequer in Ireland, made in this Cause, bearing date the 15th day of November, 1806, I hereby require all Creditors and Legatees having Charges or Incumbrances affecting the personal Estate of George Goold, Esq. deceased, in the Pleadings named, to come in before me at my Office on the Inns-quay, Dublin, on or before the 24th day of January next, and prove the same, otherwise they will be procluded the Benefit of said Decree.- W.W. POLE. Dated 20th day of December, 1806.


DIED. April? - At Pallace (Kerry) Mr. J. James, son of the late Raleigh James, Esq of Limerick - A few days ago, at Isle, Co. Kerry, in her 108th year, Margaret Donoghue, whose constitution and bodily strength has enabled her to walk three miles to a neighbouring chapel on every Sunday for the last 20 years.


Limerick, March 25. - Monday night the 16th inst eight villains broke into the house of Mr. Michael Lanagan near Cahir, laid him on the floor, put straw under and over him, the set fire to it, and tortured him in such a manner that he confessed he had 150 guineas, which he handed them, but was so shockingly burned that he died on Friday; and on Sunday another house was robbed in the same neighbourhood.
Sunday the Hon. Mr. Justice Day, and the Right Hon. Mr. Prime Serjeant Daly, Lords Justices of Assizes for the Munster Circuits, arrived in town, and on Monday they opened their respective Commissions.


By the Lord Lieutenant and Council of Ireland,
A PROCLAMATION
CORNWALLIS.


WHEREAS we have received information upon oath that on the Night of the 17th day of March, inst. William Brandon, Shepherd to Michael Burke, Esq of Spring-Garden, in the County of Galway, was barbarously murdered at or near Spring-Garden, aforesaid, by some evil minded person or persons unknown, who fired a gun or pistol shot at the breast of the said William Brandon, and also nearly severed his head from his body.
Now we the Lord Lieutenant and Council of Ireland being fully determined, as far as in us lies, to bring the perpetrators of said inhuman murder to speedy and condign punishment, do by this our Proclamation publish and declare, that if any person or persons shall within the space of Six Months next after the date of this our Proclamation, discover the persons concerned in the said murder, so as that he, she, or they be apprehended and convicted thereof, such person or persons so discovering shall receive as a Reward the sum of ONE HUNDRED POUNDS for each and every of the persons who shall be so discovered, apprehended, and convicted of the said murder.
And we do hereby publish and declare, that if any Person or Persons concerned in the said Murder (the Person or Persons who actually committed the same only excepted) shall, within the time aforesaid, discover his, or their Accomplice or Accomplices, so as that he, she, or they may be apprehended and convicted thereof, such Person or Persons shall not only receive the said reward, but shall also receive his Majesty's most gracious and free pardon for the said Murder.
And we do hereby strictly charge and command all Justices of the Peace, Mayors, Sheriffs, Bailiffs, and all other his Majesty's loving subjects, to use their utmost endeavours to bring the said Offenders, and every of them, to speedy and condign punishment.
Given at the Council Chamber in Dublin the Thirty-First Day of March, 1801.

Clainricarde, Shannon, Donoughmore, Kilwarden, G.S. Frankfort, D. Latouche, J. Monck, Mason.
GOD SAVE THE KING.

 

SOCIETY
FOR PROMOTING the COMFORTS of the POOR.
THE Society will give a Premium of TWENTY GUINEAS for the best ESSAY on a GENERAL PLAN for providing for the Poor of this Kingdom - Also, TEN GUINEAS, for the next best Essay on the same subject.
Also, a MEDAL or THREE GUINEAS, at the choice of the Person applying, to the Author of the best ESSAY on any of the following subjects :--
1st. Advice to a Cottier having an Acre and Half of Land.
2d Method of Managing a coarse Kitchen garden.
3d. Management and Culture of Potatoes.
4th Advice to the Poor in Towns.
N.B. The Essays to be approved by the General Committee, and enclosed to WM. DISNEY, Esq, No.5, Hume-street, before the 1st of January, 1802 - March 6, 1801.

 


Faulkners Dublin Journal May 1764

 

GAMBLER, the Property of Mr. Hugh O'Neill, will cover Mares this Season, at Bettystown, near Drogheda, at one Guinea a Mare and a Shilling to the Servant; he is 14 Hands 3 Inches high, of great Strength and vast Bone, and five Years old, a brown Bay, and free from all Blemishes whatsoever. He is own Brother to Mr. Watson's Filly, which won the Subscription of 240 Guineas for three Years old last October at Newmarket, and is thought the best Mare of her Years in England; he was got by Young Cade, his Dam by Old Traveller, his Grand Dam by Hip, (a Son of the Cunvin bay Barb) his Great Grand Dam by Snake, a Son of the Lyster Turk, out of Darcy Royal Mare, Mr. Yever's Mare called Yorkshire Jenny, which won the great Subscription last Season at York, for five Years old, with great Ease, and won the King's Hundred Guineas this last April last at Newmarket, was got by Cade, her Dam by Old Traveller. Good Grass for Mares, and proper Care, at 2s. 2d per Week.

 


Feb 8th 1817


LIMERICK, JAN. 5.- On the night of the 26th ult. as John Shouldice, the Permanent-Serjeant of the Castleotway corps of yeomanry, was on his return from Nenagh, where he had been on some business connected with the Sessions, he was waylaid about the hour of eight o'clock in the evening, and within a quarter of a mile of his own dwelling, and fired at from behind an hedge with such accuracy of aim, that six slugs were lodged in his back. - In tracing back for any cause for this diabolical act of vengeance, we think that Shouldice was one of the persons who helped to defend Wallis's house - Limerick Chronicle
On Thursday night last, a large party of men armed and mounted, attacked and broke into the house of a respectable farmer named Mally, about two miles from Newport, and forcibly carried off his daughter, after abusing and beating the father and mother. She was thrown across a horse, held by two men, and carried to Gouge, near Castle-Connell, almost naked, her brother and some friends, who pursued were beaten off. The next day Mr. Robert Going, with a party of the army, made a close search for her without success, as she had been removed to some other place, but on Saturday evening the Rev. Mr. Crampton was so fortunate as to recover her, and bring her to his house where, from the ill treatment she received, she was obliged to remain till yesterday, when her sent her home with her father, escorted by a party of soldiers to a place of safety. Mr. Waller, of Castle-Waller, has used every effort to investigate this outrage, and having obtained information against some of the principals, we have no doubt from the activity of these Magistrates, they will ere long be brought to condign punishment.


Travelling between Holyhead, London, Cheltenham, &c. &c.
ROYAL HIBERNIA HOTEL, HOLYHEAD.
THOMAS MORAN, Proprietor.


RESPECTFULLY informs the Nobility and Gentry of the United Kingdom, and of his Native Land (Ireland) in particular, that he has established the above will all its necessary accommodations, upon principles which, while they have essentially served the Public, have secured to him the zealous Patronage of those who have once favoured his Hotel with a visit.
As by setting out upon the plan of such moderate charges as barely support his system of comfort, the excellence of his Larder and Cellar, as also his Public and Private Travelling accommodations, MORAN has already vanquished all the efforts of the previous Monopoly at this great Thoroughfare, and consequently done away with most of its injurious effects to the Public, as it effected both the Hotel and travelling departments; so be a steady adherence to such system - MORAN looks forward with respectful confidence to the only remuneration he aspires to, namely the small but steady profit arising from Public favour, and the reputation of his Hotel, Livery Stables, Posting accommodation and the Prince of Wales Light Post Chaise, which starts daily from his Hotel from 10 to 12 o'Clock, according to the arrival of the Irish Packet, and runs through the New Capel Cerrig Road, to Shrewsbury, (from whence certain conveyances start at all hours to every Town of note in the Kingdom,) Birmingham, Oxford, and London. As also the Hibernia Coach, to Cheltenham and Bath, three days a week, and is the only Coach direct from Holyhead to Cheltenham.
Note - The Saving to the Traveller caused by Moran's system, will be provided at the Bar and Coach Office, of the Royal Hibernia Hotel, which possesses another convenience, of much weight, where Ladies and Children are concerned, namely, his Hotel is near to the water-side, and the mooring of the Packets, and it also nearly adjoins the Custom House, where Moran personally attends, to get out the luggage of such Ladies and Gentleman, as may be fatigued, and unable to attend themselves.
Holyhead, Jan.4, 1817.

 

Dec 1810

 

On Wednesday night, the 21st instant, Messrs.Laffan and White, Acting Inspectors for the district of Ennis, left that town, accompanied by a party of the military, and proceeded to the neighbourhood of Schariff, where they detected five very extensive private distilleries, and after having destroyed an immense quantity of malt, pot-ale, singlings, and the utensils, returned to that town with the stills, heads, and worms, which they lodged in his Majesty's store; and also two men as prisoners, whom they surprised in one of the distilleries, and who are bound over by them before a Magistrate, to stand their trials at the next assizes for said county. The exertion of these officers in that county already, has had the most happy effects, by inducing a gentleman of respectability to take out license for a still of a large content in the town of Ennis, where there has not been one for many years. We sincerely hope that the Excise Officers throughout Ireland will now exert themselves to put down this baneful and abominable trade, which has so much tended to decrease the revenue of the country, the profits of the fair and honourable trader, and to contaminate the morals of the poor and innocent peasantry.

We have received the following account of a new outrage committed by those deluded men styling themselves Caravats :- The home of Mr.O'Ryan, of Ballycurkeen[?], was attacked on Sunday morning, about ten o'clock. Except Mrs.O'Ryan and one female servant, the remainder of the family were at Mass, and Mr.O'Ryan absent. The hall door being incautiously left open, three men, well armed, entered and proceeded directly to the parlour where Mrs.O'Ryan was, and threatened her with instant death if she made the least noise or resistance, and did not give up what fire-arms were in the house; she told them she did not know where they were, offering them at the same time the keys of the house to search for them, upon which they left the room, breaking open eight drawers, saying they would not lose time in trying to unlock them; they likewise forced open some desks and trunks. Whilst they were thus occupied, Mrs.Ryan went out of the house, and ran up the avenue, calling loudly for assistance, which, when the Caravats heard, they pursued her and forced her back, one of them holding his hand to her mouth to prevent her crying out; - they tore here clothes in forcing her back, swearing they would shoot her, which one of them was about to do, when prevented by another. They then searched the house more closely, when they found a case of pistols and some powder and ball, the rest of the arms having, a few days before, been sent to be repaired, which prevented them from falling into the hands of those ruffians. They went off in different directions; when going, they said they were from the county of Limerick, and that they would return again, as they knew there were more arms in the house.- Waterford Mirror.

On Tuesday last as three Valuators, accompanied by four Police men, were proceeding on some tithe business in the neighbourhood of Ardfinnan, the party was surrounded in the house of one Shee by a mob of upwards of fifteen villains with their faces blackened, and furnished with straw cravats, who murdered Arthur Mullowney, one of the Police men, by shooting him. It appears as if their vengeance was particularly directed against this man, it being upon his information that a fellow named Leamy is now confined in Conmel gaol upon a capital charge for firing at a Police man, at the time that Mr.Clutterbuck narrowly escaped being shot, in attempting to seize Leamy.- A person of the name of John Fennessy has been committed to Clonmel gaol, charged with being present, aiding and abetting at the above murder.

A few days since, two men armed entered an house in Carrick in the noon-day, and presenting a pistol at the head of two women, its only inhabitants, demanded the arms, threatening with the most vehement imprecations to put the women to death, in case of noise or resistance. The consequence is obvious; the only arms in the house, a carbine or firelock, they took off unmolested.

 

The Queen of France's Funeral.
London, Nov.27.


At nine o'clock yesterday morning, the service for the dead began at the Roman Catholic Chapel in Portman-square. The French Princes arrived at ten, the Foreign Ambassadors between eleven and twelve.
The coffin was placed in the middle of the chapel, covered with crimson velvet, and highly ornamented; in an escutcheon were the arms of France and Savoy, and the Crown of France was placed at the head; it was surrounded with 40 lighted tapers. At the head of the coffin stood the Duke d'Avery, as having the charge of the Crown; and near him Pere Elizee, Surgeon to her Majesty; at the foot next to the altar stood the Count de la Chatre, as Commissary of the King of France, and near him the Compte de Nantouillet, as Master of the Ceremonies. On the right on a row of raised seats were the French Princes, Monsieur the Duke D'Angouleme, the Duke de Berry, the Prince de Conde, and the Duke de Bourbon; and below them their respective officers. Mr.De Broval, we suppose, as representing the Duke of Orleans, sat on the left of the Princes. On the left of the coffin, and opposite to the French Princes, was another row of seats for the Foreign Ambassadors. Below them were the great dignitaries of the ancient French military and chivalric orders.
The service was performed by Mr.Dalbignac, Bishop of Angouleme; there were also present Mr.Talleyrand; Archbishop of Rheims, the Bishops of Sisteron, Digne, Nantes, Tarbes, Rhodez, Aire, Usez, Blois, and Montpelier.
The cards of admission for the abbey were simply for the "funeral of the Countess De Lille" and we cannot sufficiently praise the nice sense of propriety which dictated that distinction. From the Chapel to the hearse the coffin was borne by twelve Knights of St.Louis, and the pall supported by four Dames d'Honneur. The procession then began in the following order :

Thirteen men on horseback; a mute with feathers on horseback; a coach and six with the four Dames d'Honneurs - Mesdames la Duchesse de Pienne, la Duchesse de Coigny, la Comtesse de Naronne, and la Comtesse de Mesnard.
Another coach and six, with persons of the household.
Gardes du Corps of foot, headed by one of their Officers.
A mourner on a fully caparisoned horse, carrying on a cushion the Crown of France, covered with black crape.
The hearse drawn by six beautiful horses, and adorned with a profusion of plumes.

In the Chapel, the same ceremonial was observed as at St.Denis, and the cards of admission were for "The Funeral of the Queen of France."
Then followed the French Princes in mourning coaches and six, followed by the principal French Nobility.
After the mourning coaches, came that of his Royal Highness the Prince of Wales, drawn by six horses, and conducted by his Highness's state coachman, with three footmen and two pages; the coaches of all the Royal Dukes followed, according to their seniority; as also two coaches and six of the Marquis of Buckingham; those of the Marquis of Wellesley, of Mr.Perceval, and all the Ministers : those of the Foreign Ambassadors, and several English Noblemen and Gentlemen.
The Dean of Westminster, at the head of the Chapter, received the body at the entrance of the Church, the avenues and the aisles being guarded and lined by the battalion of Volunteers of St.John and St.Margaret's, commanded by Major Jones.- A requiem was sung by the full Choir, accompanied by the organ; and after the ceremony, the remains of the Princess were deposited in the same vault with those of the Duke of Montpensier, on the south-west side of King Henry VII's Chapel.


Dec 30th 1806


DIED.- At Cloney, near Newtownlimavady, on the 17th instant, Mr. Wm. Haslett, aged 75. - At Cork, Capt. Wm. Barry; he had served for nearly half a century with honour and reputation, first in the Saxon, afterwards in the Prussian, and finally in the British Army.- Mrs. Hodnett, relict of the Rev. Wm. Hodnett, of Carrymore, at the advanced age of 78 years.


We mention with sincere regret the death on the 7th inst of Jas. Beresford, Esq. the fifth son of the late Right Hon. John Beresford : he was a Midshipman on board the Phoenix, and while loosing the top-gallant-sail in chase of a Spanish frigate, he was unfortunately shaken off the yard by a heavy sea that struck the ship.
The Lord Chancellor Ponsonby continued his sittings in the Court of Chancery every day since the expiration of the late Michaelmas Term, until Wednesday last.


The Magistrates of Limerick have publicly stated that an unusual number of Foreigners and other Strangers had of late sojourned in that city and its liberties, some of whom there was reason to suspect of misleading many, by inciting them to attend those nightly meetings which have disturbed the peace of the country, and accordingly required all such Foreigners, &c. to appear before one of them, to satisfy them of their object in repairing to that city, or else they would be arrested.
The London Gazette of Tuesday contains an order of Council for continuing the bounties granted for the encouragement of seamen and landmen to enter into the Royal Navy, from the 31st of December, 1806, to the 31st December, 1807, with the exception that the rewards to persons procuring seamen and landmen are reduced as follows :- for each, Able Seaman three guineas; for each Ordinary Seaman, two guineas; and for each Landman, one guinea; together with the same allowance for travelling expences as before.

 

DECREES.

Margaret Connell, otherwise Goold, by John Agnew Connell, Esq. her Husband and next Friend, Plaintiff.
Sir Francis Goold, Bart; Sir Patrick O'Coner, Knt. and Others, Defendants.


PURSUANT to the Decree of His Majesty's Court of Exchequer in Ireland, made in this Cause, bearing date the 15th day of November, 1806, I hereby require all Creditors and Legatees having Charges or Incumbrances affecting the personal Estate of George Goold, Esq. deceased, in the Pleadings named, to come in before me at my Office on the Inns-quay, Dublin, on or before the 24th day of January next, and prove the same, otherwise they will be procluded the Benefit of said Decree.- W.W. POLE. Dated 20th day of December, 1806.