From

 

http://www.kerrycomhaltas.ie/contentPage/10012943/michael_dowling_r_i_p

 

 

 

 

 

The Ballydonoghue Parish Magazine was the brainchild of Sarah Buckley, Knockenagh, back in 1985. Sarah with the help of Martin Lynch, produced the very first edition, thus sowing the seed for what has become a very comprehensive account of the history, as well as the current happenings in this rural parish.

 

http://ballydonoghue.net/category/magazine/

 

 

 

magazine@ballydonoghue.net

 

 

 

https://northkerry.wordpress.com/2016/03/14/ballydonoghue/

 

https://northkerry.wordpress.com/2015/08/09/kennelly-foran-from-moyvane-and-lisselton/

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

A Year of Being Here daily mindfulness poetry by wordsmiths of the here & now

 

http://www.ayearofbeinghere.com/search?q=irish

 

 

 

 

 

http://www.ayearofbeinghere.com/search?updated-min=2015-01-01T00:00:00-06:00&updated-max=2016-01-01T00:00:00-06:00&max-results=50

 

 

 

Irish history, folklore and all that

 

 

 

January 5, 2015

 

History of the Jews in Ireland

 

https://irishhistoryfiles.wordpress.com/category/general/page/12/

 

 

 

ANNASCAUL

 

https://irishhistoryfiles.wordpress.com/category/annascaul/

 

 

 

 

 

GREAT SOUTHERN TRAIL

 

The further development and enhancement of the Great Southern Trail is gathering momentum. Recent funding totalling €1.3million has already been allocated for the upgrading  of the 40km Rathkeale to Kerry Border section and planning of a link to Adare and Limerick City is being studied.

 

 

 

On the Kerry side of the border the county's Tourism Strategy and Action Plan 2016-2022 was launched on October 21st. The developments of the Border-Listowel and Tralee-Fenit sections are given priority status (see attachments: paragraphs 1.7.2 and 1.7.3) although the Listowel-Tralee section is listed as a longer term project (attachment: paragraph 1.7.4).

 

 

 

The GST appreciates the positive approach of Kerry County Council's management and elected members to this long overdue project and realises the problems they have to overcome.

 

 

 

Our thanks also to Michael Healy-Rae T.D. for his raising of the matter in the Dáil and for his support.

 

 

 

 

 

It is now almost four years since Limerick City & County Council completed construction to the Border. The actions of a few have since then stymied progress beyond the Border to the detriment of the general  Kerry community. We read in the "Sunday Business Post" (23/10/2016....see attachment) that Government Greenway funds previously allocated to Kerry have just now been transferred to the Midlands as a result of these obstructive tactics. We must not forget that the North Kerry Railway is the property of the people with ownership at present being transferred from CIÉ to Kerry County Council. The time lost and cost to the public purse of this transfer was as a direct result of the obstructive tactics of a small minority. No such transfer was necessary in Limerick or in Waterford when their Greenways were being successfully developed.

 

 

 

 

 

The growth of cycling tourism is phenomenal with the French section of EuroVelo1 ( see map on www.eurovelo.com/en/eurovelos/eurovelo-1) seeing an increase in numbers of 17% over the past two years. Many of these cyclists are of the older generation (affectionately called SILVER CYCLISTS!) and their spending capacity is of great benefit to the tourism industry. The link www.silvercyclists.eu/bookable-offers/ illustrates this point.

 

 

 

 

 

Let us hope that the people of North Kerry will soon enjoy the benefits of  Greenways which threaten nobody as the rest of Ireland can readily vouch for.

 

 

 

 

 

Liam O'Mahony,

 

 

 

Cathaoirleach,

 

June 2016;

Festival Time

 

 

 

This coming weekend sees the second staging of Athea Parish Festival which is organised by the Con Colbert Community Hall Committee. From Thursday afternoon to Sunday night there will be something for people of all ages  to enjoy from the tea party to card games, darts, barman’s race, slow bike race, fancy dress, 5K road race, Ceili, Comhaltas Concert, Festival Queen, dances and barbeques. Hope I haven’t left anything out of this very full and exciting programme of events. All we need now is a bit of fine weather. I can’t help thinking back to the old carnivals in Athea in the middle of the last century. They were organised by the G.A.A. and the village would be packed for the duration. We had a dozen pubs in those days and each one would be full as people came, not only from our own parish but from neighbouring parishes as well, to join in the festivities. There was a lot more drinking in those days than there is now.  We hear a lot about binge drinking, especially by the younger generation, but they wouldn’t hold a candle to the drinkers of old. Young people generally confine their drinking to the weekends and then maybe on one night only but, back in the ‘seventies, the bars were doing a brisk trade day and night. Some people couldn’t even go to the creamery in the morning without having a pint or two. Thankfully there were very few motor vehicles on the road so accidents were scarce. Anyway a good time would be had by all at the carnival.

 

 

 

In those days regulations were not as strict as they are today. A marquee would be erected for dancing, which was the main source of income over the week. Bands would be booked from all over the country and the place would be heaving with bodies. The problem of toilets was solved by letting the men use the bushes out the back but the ladies presented a problem. On the first occasion of using a marquee the problem was solved by a local business man who cordoned off one area outside and placed an empty paint bucket in it for the ladies to use! Needless to say they weren’t amused. As time went on things improved and, though they wouldn’t have a hope of passing inspection today, proper toilets were supplied. At that time there were no direct telephone lines. If you wanted to make a call you had to turn a handle to get through to the local exchange who patched you through to Listowel if you were going outside the area. Making a call home from England was a similar task. During one carnival my aunt Nora, who lived in Coventry was trying to call my mother (we had one of the few phones in the parish  – very posh!) about 8pm in the evening. She went through the local exchange to the international one which got her as far as Dublin and then onto Listowel and finally to Athea.  The operator asked to be connected to Athea 17 which was our number at the time. The late Edsie O’Connor R.I.P. was manning the switchboard and answered; “there is no point in looking for them, they are at the carnival, I saw them a couple of minutes ago”.  That was service for you.

 

 

 

One of the highlights of the carnival was the donkey derby. There was great rivalry between local donkey owners and there was often a “ringer” slipped in. On one occasion a donkey qualified for the final but when he appeared at the starting line he was a lot bigger than  when he qualified half an hour before. Of course a row ensued but eventually peace was restored and the race was finally run when the big donkey was disqualified. Happy days. No problem with insurance in those days. If you wanted to run a donkey derby in the street now it would be nearly impossible to get insurance cover for it. Despite the absence of donkeys, enjoy the forthcoming festival.

 

 

 

 Domhnall de Barra

 

MORE LOCAL BITS

 

The Limerick meteorite fell on September 10, 1813, with several stones falling in county Limerick near Scagh, Adare, Brasky and Faha. Witnesses reported a “huge fireball in the sky” and loud explosions that resembled the sound of heavy artillery. One of the meteorites fell close to a witness and was immediately dug out of the soft earth. The meteorite was said to be warm to the touch with a sulphurous smell.

A report in the Limerick Chronicle of 11 Sept 1813; “Yesterday morning at about nine o’clock, there was the most dreadful thunder heard in the direction of Patrickwell, towards Adare and Rathkeale”, and went on to state that “large fragments of atmospheric stones” accompanied the thunder which was “violent and continued for a considerable time.”

 

 

 

 

My G G Grandfather John R Walsh came from your area with his son my G Grandfather Patrick E Walsh abt 1850. My G Grandmother Mary Stack came to the USA through New Orleans on Feb 27 1852 with her half brother Richard Gregory. The ships records show that Mary was 20 and Richard was 6, those ages were recorded in 1852. I would like to have someone there in Moyvane or surrounding towns do some look up for me, please contact me if you would be willing to do so for a fee. John R Walsh was born about 1810 or so, that is marked on stone, Partrick E Walsh was born c 1830 or so. Patrick E Walsh married Mary Stack c 1855 in Paris Kentucky USA. As you can see that my name has Walsh heritage as my mother named me for her father Robert Patrick Walsh, He was born to Patrick E Walsh and Mary Stack Walsh. I will not stop looking for info on this family that came from your lovely land until I get the family names of my ancestors.

 

 

FLEADH BY THE FEALE: The much anticipated Fleadh by the Feale takes place Thursday – Monday next. On Thursday the Presentation of Art Poster Prizes & Exhibition takes place at the Library from 7.30pm then from 9.30pm the Gathering Sessions of music, song and dance will be happening all over town. Friday Traditional Street Busking followed at 9.30pm by a Ceili in Fr Casey's GAA clubhouse. Saturday will be very busy with Master workshop Classes and the Kostal Ireland International

Soccer Tournament kicks off at Pairc na Gael from 12noon. There will be free Traditional Entertainment in the square between 8-9pm and sessions all over town in the various pubs. Sunday at 3pm we’ll have Afternoon Storytelling with Daisy Kearny & Friends in St Ita's Hall and in the Square face painting @ 3pm with Junior bone playing All Ireland @ 3.30pm. Then at 8pm the highlight of the weekend Traditional Celebrity Concert with International Group The Kilfenora Ceili Band “Spraoi Show” with guest singer Don Stiff, world champion dancer Michael Donnellan and the West Clare Set dancers and supported by the Colaiste Ide agus Iosef Music Group in the Colaiste Ide agus Iosef Hall. Tickets from Slice of Life; 068-32655,Abbey Tiles; 068-31661, Maureen; 086-3265762; Celine; 087-7697672, John; 086-3165848. Sessions will continue in the pubs all over the weekend and then the grand finale on Monday from 7.30pm - Traditional entertainment in the Square followed by All Ireland Bone playing Competition in the square @ 8pm. Come to Abbeyfeale for the Fleadh – stay for the craic.

 


Hanging at the Cross

Hanging at the cross where the streets meet in Newtownsands.
Told by Con Shine (carpenter).
Written by J.B. Connell (NT Moyvane)


My father remembers the white boys. There was a landlord in Kilbaha called Wall. There was another in Moyvane named Sands. Sands knew the names of all the white boys in the district. So did Wall. The white boys trusted Sands. But they were afraid that Wall would tell all the names. So they decided to do away with wall. Wall was afraid of them. He made up his mind to take a house in Glin and went the Kerry line to Glin . But he came back by Newtownsands way. The white boys watched him they attacked his house that night and the firing went on till morning. In the morning they set fire to the house and Wall was burned to death. 200 soldiers came from Limerick the following day. They were to kill everybody they met. But Sands met them over on the Tarbert road near Johnny Nashs and told them not touch anybody that he would have all the white boys arrested that he knew them all. The soldiers did no harm then. They went to Kilbaha and the first they met were my father and my uncle Johnny threshing in the haggard. Sands said they are two honest boys, they�re a widow sons they never did harm to anybody. And so they did noting to them. My father was about 18 at the time. Sands gave the names of all the white boys and they were arrested and tried in Tralee. Three of them were sentenced to be hanged one of them was ordered to be brought to Newtown to be hanged his name was Neill (Nayle). He was the ringleader he was hanged in Newtown by the soldiers. They drove 2 poles in the ground below at the cross and put another pole across they then put him standing in a horses car put a rope around his neck then pulled away the car and left him hanging there. He was hanging there all day. The soldiers use to come often and give him a swing for sport and leave him swing away for himself. All the doors were shut that day. You would not see a head out the door.
In the evening they took him down and carried him to Tralee in a car. But they lost him above at Shea`s height Clountubrid. They turned back and found him again and carried him to Tralee.
The other two were hanged in Tralee on of them was Mulvihill. I do not know who the other man was. Wall lived in Kilbaha where the road turns up to Kennelly`s house.

Note Michael Mulvihill tried Tralee 3rd march 1809 .He set fire to Walls House . Executed 29th July 1809 .
Danny McMahon claimed that Wall was not at home the attackers set fire to his house took the child from the maid and tossed it into the burning house .
Report in Limerick Chronicle 15th April 1823. Kelly white boy attack Kitson on Sept. 1821.

 

 

 

 

World War 1 Local Deaths

 

NEWTOWNSANDES ONLINE

 


World War 1 Local Deaths
Maurice Hannon Lixnaw, 6488 d 10 November 1917

William Danaher Listowel 7529, d 19 July 1917.

Tim Galvin Brosna, 17873, d 17 January 1917

John Barry, Listowel, 7579, 2nd Battalion Irish guards, killed in action in France on the 17th March 1917.

Wiliam T Blundel, 64871, Listowel, d 21st April 1917

Pat Bunyan, Listowel, 7047, d 10th November 1917,

William Burke, listowel, 3591, d 10 November 1917,

Edward Carmody, Listowel, 5639, d 4th May 1917,

John Cleary, Listowel, d 1st May 1917, aged 27

Samuel Whitaker, 19059, Tarbert, d 26th September 1916

Fr, Donal o Sullivan, Chaplin, d 5th July 1916, some,

Pat Pierce, 3970, Dysert, d 28th June 1916,

William Nolan, Ballylongford, 5408, 5th August 1916.

Edward Nolan, Cahirciveen, d 26th June 1916,

Maurice o Connell, 4969, d France 21st August 1916,

Michael Lynch, Tarbert, 6446, d 1st June 1916,

Michael McAulife, Listowel, d 1916,

James Smyth, Listowel, d November 1917,

John Sullivan, Listowel, 40918, d 25th October 1917,

Michael Sullivan, 13971, Lixnaw, d 26th September 1917,

William o Boyle, 10491, Ballybunion, d 2nd November 1917,

Paul McElligott, Listowel, 305434, d 12 August 1917, Africa

Michael Healy, Listowel, d 15th September 1917, India

John Hennessy, Listowel, 4794, d 31st July 1917,

Charles Hewson, Listowel, d 12th April 1917, Cameroon,

John Kelliher, Kerry, 5266, d 12th October 1917,

John Kirby, Listowel, 22751, d 3rd May 1917,

Edward Lacey, Listowel, 4782, d 22nd July 1917,

Bernard Gibney, Listowel, 24640, 19th April 1917,

Christopher Godfrey, Listowel, 6428, 22nd September 1917,

Robert Charles Hudson, Canada, Tralee, d 17th October 1918,

Denis Daly, Listowel, 1576, d 26th December 1918,

Michael Dee, Coolard, 1296, d 20th October 1918,

Maurice Downes, 241264, Listowel, d 23 March 1918,

John Enright, Listowel, 2148, d 29th September 1918,

William Fitzmaurice, Tarbert, 6486, d 21 March 1918,

James Cannavan Listowel 498714 , d 10 Oct 1918.

Michael Sheehy Sgt, Duagh, d 9th July 1918.

Michael Stack Listowel 4516 d 8-4-1918wounds.

John Sullivan 4279 d 30 Sept 1918.

J Byrne Listowel 3644, d 1918.

Jeremiah Leahy Lixnaw 7298 d 10-1-1918.

Wilson Mc Cracken Listowel d12th Oct 1918 no 20170.


TOM MOORE
www.geocities.com/dalyskennelly_2000


Newtownsandes Famous People:
Thomas Moore his ancestors are said to have come from Newtownsandes.Tom Moore Poet born Dublin 28 of May 1779.He died 26th of Feb 1852 in his 73rd Year bured at Bromham near Devizes in Wiltshire England his Father was a Grocer till 1806 he later became a barrick master.It is thought his Mother had a great Influence on Him.After the Relief act of 1793 Catholics were allowed to enter TCD but were denied Degres.Mr Whyte Teacher of Tom Moore Entered him in TCD at the age of 15 as a Protestant.He left TCD in 1798 to Study Law in London.He Never Practiced Law writing was his Passion so in 1801 he Published his first Poems under the pen name of Thomas Little.Thomas Moore was Welcomed Everywhere he could Sing his own songs and Entertain in any Society.In 1803 he was Appointed as Registrar of the Admiralty Court at Bermuda.He stayed at his Post for a short while.Then put his Deputy in Charge while himself toured the U.S.A and Canada.More Poems were Published in 1806.Irish Melodies were Published in 1807.200 years Later his Irish Songs are still Popular all over the world.Actress Bessy Dyke Married Tom Moore in 1811.''Lalla Rookh'' was Published in 1817.Longmans Paid the Highest Price Ever for the Copy Right.About this time his Deputy in Bermuda Caused a huge loss and Moore was Liable to avoid Arrest he went to Paris and his Family Followed Him there.C 1822 he made a Bargain where the Claim Against him was Reduced to one sixth of the Original Claim which he paid he was now free to come home iifig .....
In 1823 he visited Ireland with Lord Lansdowne after which he wrote a history of Captain Rock and His Ancestors which was well Recived.He was a friend of Emmet and Remembers him in ''O Breathe Not his name''.Other Historical works of Tom Moore, Life of Sheridan Published in 1825 it took 7 years to write, Life of Byron Pub 1830. Life of Lord Edward Fitzgerald Pub 1831.Travels of an Irish Gentleman in Seach of a Religion.Published 1834 also the History of Ireland was Published Later.
In 1845 all his Children and Sisters were Dead he said that he did not have a single Relative left in the world.

 


Thomas Moore

Newtownsandes

 

The Vales of New Dirreen

 

 

Fare well, fare well, my native land farewell forever more,
I now must leave you far behind and seek a foreign shore,
For very soon the ocean wide between us will intervene,
In that dear old home its mine no more, in the vales of New Direen.

At home in dear old Ireland I fain for ever would stay,
But fate it has compelled for to wander far away,
From these native hills and valleys fair where blooms the shamrock green
In that dear old home its mine no more in the Vales of New Dirreen

In cold dark waves and Saxon lands we have known great joys and woes
And in that far off ocean wide where the stately Hudson flows
In Ireland too we have cherished hopes but seas are placed between
From that dear old home its mine no more in the Vales of New Dirreen

The sandowen seas I have crossed before and sought a foreign strand
But still I thought I soon would see again my native land
Its like John Mitchell in his cell where something tells unseen
Which makes me roam from my dear old home in the Vales of New Dirreen

When last I looked upon that place it was with a mournful eye
The tears fell trickling down my face and loudly I did cry
The pale of night it soon came down and that was the last I had Seen
of my dear old home its mine no more in Vales of New Dirreen

Now to Conclude those enfin lines fearing I should be late
The Mourning Train from Adagh starts at twenty five past eight
O God be with you Ireland your the starlight ocean Qeen
And a Fond farewell to all who dwell in the Vales of New Dirreen.

Newtownsandes Famous People:

Thomas Moore his ancestors are said to have come from Newtownsandes.Tom Moore Poet born Dublin 28 of May 1779.He died 26th of Feb 1852 in his 73rd Year bured at Bromham near Devizes in Wiltshire England his Father was a Grocer till 1806 he later became a barrick master.It is thought his Mother had a great Influence on Him.After the Relief act of 1793 Catholics were allowed to enter TCD but were denied Degres.Mr Whyte Teacher of Tom Moore Entered him in TCD at the age of 15 as a Protestant.He left TCD in 1798 to Study Law in London.He Never Practiced Law writing was his Passion so in 1801 he Published his first Poems under the pen name of Thomas Little.Thomas Moore was Welcomed Everywhere he could Sing his own songs and Entertain in any Society.In 1803 he was Appointed as Registrar of the Admiralty Court at Bermuda.He stayed at his Post for a short while.Then put his Deputy in Charge while himself toured the U.S.A and Canada.More Poems were Published in 1806.Irish Melodies were Published in 1807.200 years Later his Irish Songs are still Popular all over the world.Actress Bessy Dyke Married Tom Moore in 1811.''Lalla Rookh'' was Published in 1817.Longmans Paid the Highest Price Ever for the Copy Right.About this time his Deputy in Bermuda Caused a huge loss and Moore was Liable to avoid Arrest he went to Paris and his Family Followed Him there.C 1822 he made a Bargain where the Claim Against him was Reduced to one sixth of the Original Claim which he paid he was now free to come home? iifig .....
In 1823 he visited Ireland with Lord Lansdowne after which he wrote a history of Captain Rock and His Ancestors which was well Recived.He was a friend of Emmet and Remembers him in ''O Breathe Not his name''.Other Historical works of Tom Moore, Life of Sheridan Published in 1825 it took 7 years to write, Life of Byron Pub 1830. Life of Lord Edward Fitzgerald Pub 1831.Travels of an Irish Gentleman in Seach of a Religion.Published 1834 also the History of Ireland was Published Later.
In 1845 all his Children and Sisters were Dead he said that he did not have a single Relative left in the world.

Tom Neville Stack
Information from Miss Mai Quillinan .
Tom Stack was married in Carrueragh Kilmorna , to Mary Neville of Carrigkerry . They had three sons the eldest born on christmas night 1849 was called Thomas Neville Stack . The second son Maurice Tom Stack married Mary Goulding their children were Tom Maurice and John Maurice Tom inherited the farm while John went to America . The third brother of Tom Neville Stack was called William he got a farm in Carrigkerry .
Mai Quillinans mother Ellie Stack was daughter of Maurice Tom Stack a brother of Tom Neville .
Mais father Michael Quillinan of Blossom Hill Rathkeale , Co Limerick . Tom Neville Stack Founded The Finance Union Journal in 1877 .It is reported that three generations before Tom Neville a member of the Stack family was a Butter Merchant in Cork who had a brother a Banker .
Another Stack Nicholas Moore Stack a man of culture and an actor taught at Maynooth and Carlow College .
Tom Neville himself was a Journalist a Financier and a Poet his second wife was a daughter of Mr Andrew Thunder of Dublin .
Mr Thunder went to Clongroves Wood College . He died aged 45yrs .
Mr and Mrs Stack were married for over 20yrs and had five children.
In 1895 Tom Neville Stack was one of the Founders of the British Homes Assurance Corporation Ltd. .
He was also an Officer in the 2nd London Rifles which was founded by Prince Albert .
Tom Neville Stacks views on Irish Banking are contained in the Blue Book which was issued by a committee of the House of Commons







Back to Index
Gerald Griffin 1803-1840


Gerald Griffin born 12th Dec 1803 died Christian Brother Cork in 1840 son of Patrick Griffin and Ellen Geary of Limerick .His grandfather James Griffin died 1798 aged 68yrs .It is claimed that his Great Grandfather was Francis Griffin who married Nora Fitzgerald and lived at Glenalappa , Newtownsandes .Gerald Griffins sister Lucy Sr Evangelist born 1806 died 1844 .Joined Presentation Convent Youghal in 1837.Her sister Anne Sr Baptist 1805 -1878 Entered Sisters of Charity, Superior Clarinbridge 1844 died there 1878 . Three of their cousins joined The Mercy Order in Limerick . The first Ellen Entered 1840 , Bridget Entered 1852, Maria Entered 1853 she died 1908 .Several of their nephews joined the Priesthood , Rev Frederick died 1902, Rev Carroll Nash died 1889, Rev John died 1939, Rev Gerald died 1940 .Another cousin Sr Mary Westropp Brereton a Mercy Sister Limerick. Gearld Griffins sister Bridget married Mr. White. They had five daughters in religion in the USA. His brother Dan had a daugter Alice born on the 22rd of February 1847. She was known as Sr. Magdalen F.C.J. She died in Canada on the 30th of April 1901. She was of the order of the Faithful Companions of Jesus. She made her vows in Brittany in France on the 28th of July 1872. The order had a house in Clarendon Street, London.


More Writers .

Sr Evangelist Curtin .

Sr Bridget Moloney .

Michael Reidy, Cordal .

Denis Brosnan , Kilsarkin .

Con Houlihan .

Moss Connor ,Kielduff .

John Francis Broderick, Knocknisnaw.

Fr M J Moloney, Abbeyfeale.

Fr Pat Collins, Moyvane.

Cannon John Begley, b 1863.

Sean Histon,Athea .Folklore .

O Connell . Mountcollins .

Sr Cusick.Nun of Kenmare .

Henry Aloysius Stack ,Listowel .

Dan O Connell ,Liberator .

Robert Leslie Boland .

Martin O Sullivan ,Athea&Ballyduff .

Charlie Linihan .

Padraig Kennelly .

James Clarance Mangan .

Fr Gaire, Duagh

Andy Mc Mahon, Moyvane .

Michael Taylor , Knockanure .

Brian O Dalaigh, Ennis .

Dick Stephenson,Piper.d1897.

Tomas Rua O Sullivan .d1848.

Charlotte O Brien, b1845.

John Downey ,Vales Direen .

Tim Costelloe ,Glin .

Audrey de Vere,b1814.

Michael Scanlon,Castlemahon.

Tim Keating, Local History.

Michael Mc Peadair O Longain .d c1770 .

Andrias Mc Craith, Maigue Poet.

Michael Og Langan. D1837 .

Pat T Ahern . d1989 .

Tim Leahy ,Clounmacon.

Eitne Strong .Glensharold

Muiris O Riordan, Abbeydorney .

Ryle T Dwyer.

Mick Mc Carthy

Sean Mc Carthy.

Fr Padraig O Fiannachta.

Fr Kieran O Sh�a.

Tom Ashe, Piper.

James Gandsey Piper, born C 1770.



Hanging at the Cross

Hanging at the cross where the streets meet in Newtownsands.
Told by Con Shine (carpenter).
Written by J.B. Connell (NT Moyvane)


My father remembers the white boys. There was a landlord in Kilbaha called Wall. There was another in Moyvane named Sands. Sands knew the names of all the white boys in the district. So did Wall. The white boys trusted Sands. But they were afraid that Wall would tell all the names. So they decided to do away with wall. Wall was afraid of them. He made up his mind to take a house in Glin and went the Kerry line to Glin . But he came back by Newtownsands way. The white boys watched him they attacked his house that night and the firing went on till morning. In the morning they set fire to the house and Wall was burned to death. 200 soldiers came from Limerick the following day. They were to kill everybody they met. But Sands met them over on the Tarbert road near Johnny Nashs and told them not touch anybody that he would have all the white boys arrested that he knew them all. The soldiers did no harm then. They went to Kilbaha and the first they met were my father and my uncle Johnny threshing in the haggard. Sands said they are two honest boys, they�re a widow sons they never did harm to anybody. And so they did noting to them. My father was about 18 at the time. Sands gave the names of all the white boys and they were arrested and tried in Tralee. Three of them were sentenced to be hanged one of them was ordered to be brought to Newtown to be hanged his name was Neill (Nayle). He was the ringleader he was hanged in Newtown by the soldiers. They drove 2 poles in the ground below at the cross and put another pole across they then put him standing in a horses car put a rope around his neck then pulled away the car and left him hanging there. He was hanging there all day. The soldiers use to come often and give him a swing for sport and leave him swing away for himself. All the doors were shut that day. You would not see a head out the door.
In the evening they took him down and carried him to Tralee in a car. But they lost him above at Shea`s height Clountubrid. They turned back and found him again and carried him to Tralee.
The other two were hanged in Tralee on of them was Mulvihill. I do not know who the other man was. Wall lived in Kilbaha where the road turns up to Kennelly`s house.

Note Michael Mulvihill tried Tralee 3rd march 1809 .He set fire to Walls House . Executed 29th July 1809 .
Danny McMahon claimed that Wall was not at home the attackers set fire to his house took the child from the maid and tossed it into the burning house .
Report in Limerick Chronicle 15th April 1823. Kelly white boy attack Kitson on Sept. 1821.

 

 

 


Moyvane 1824 Farmers
Mary Stack,47.50 Acres.
James Moriarty,29 Acres.
Richard Collins,13.25 Acres.
Widow Gallaher, 5.75. Acres
John Stack, 6.25 Acres
Connor,46.50 Acres
Michael Mangan,19.50 Acres
Dan Mc Carthy,5 Acres
John Guiney, 8.25 Acres
David Guiney, 4 Acres
E Mc Grath, 14.50 Acres
M Hennessy, 8 Acres
Land 52.50
11.50 Acres
Michael Buckley, 11.75 Acres
Tom Connor, 11.75 Acres
Tim Connell, 19.50 Acress
Michael Ahern, 9 Acres
28.50 Acres
Edmond Stack, 17.50 Acres
John Forhan, 39.25 Acres
6.75 Acres
Morgan Connell and
Tim Connell, 37.75 Acres
Edmond Stack, 35 Acres
John Moore, 38.50 Acres
Pat Mc Mahon, 46.50 Acres



Knockanure c1820


Keylod and Gortaglanna
John Sweeney ,John Sandes, Tom Connor, John Moran, Con Keane, Pat Moore, Tom Kelly, John Goulding, ? ? ,Tim Ahern, ? Connor, James Leahy, John Goulding, ? Moloney, ? ? , Mc Mahon, Tom & George & John Sandes, James Nash.

Carrueragh And Coilagurteen

Denis Mahony, Tom Lister, Fitzgerald & Dore, Widow Larkin, Francis Carroll, David & ? Flynn, Tom Nolan, Joe Sweeney, Widow Stack, Garrett Stack, John Relihan, Pat Stack, Wm. Connor, John Griffin, Tim Leahy, John & Widow Leahy, Tom Costelloe .

Kilmeaney
Geo Gun, Mrs Raymond, Widow Sullivan, Ml & Widow Relihan, ? Pope, Wm. Moore, D Finucane, John & Phil Costelloe, Pat & Dl Burns. Buckley & Finucane, Ml & John Costelloe.

Gortdromagowna

John Kelly, James Fitzgerald ? ,John Cregan, John Mc Mahon, Ml & Tom Mulvihill, John Buckley, Ml Scanlon, Widow Stack O Connor, Widow Connor & Son, Dl & Eamon Griffin, Tom & John Connor, Wm. Stack, Tom Mulvihill, Rob & Tim Leigh, Widow Sullivan , Dl & P Connor & W Buckley, Tim Leahy , Darby Connor.



Keylod and Gortaglanna
John Sweeney ,John Sandes, Tom Connor, John Moran, Con Keane, Pat Moore, Tom Kelly, John Goulding, ? ? ,Tim Ahern, ? Connor, James Leahy, John Goulding, ? Moloney, ? ? , Mc Mahon, Tom & George & John Sandes, James Nash.

Carrueragh And Coilagurteen

Denis Mahony, Tom Lister, Fitzgerald & Dore, Widow Larkin, Francis Carroll, David & ? Flynn, Tom Nolan, Joe Sweeney, Widow Stack, Garrett Stack, John Relihan, Pat Stack, Wm. Connor, John Griffin, Tim Leahy, John & Widow Leahy, Tom Costelloe .

Kilmeaney
Geo Gun, Mrs Raymond, Widow Sullivan, Ml & Widow Relihan, ? Pope, Wm. Moore, D Finucane, John & Phil Costelloe, Pat & Dl Burns. Buckley & Finucane, Ml & John Costelloe.

Gortdromagowna

John Kelly, James Fitzgerald ? ,John Cregan, John Mc Mahon, Ml & Tom Mulvihill, John Buckley, Ml Scanlon, Widow Stack O Connor, Widow Connor & Son, Dl & Eamon Griffin, Tom & John Connor, Wm. Stack, Tom Mulvihill, Rob & Tim Leigh, Widow Sullivan , Dl & P Connor & W Buckley, Tim Leahy , Darby Connor.

 

 

 

 

Knockanure Branch of Macra na Feirme was Established in 1955.

President: Fr. J Galvin C.C
Vice-President: Joe Sweeney ,Pat Kennelly .
Chairman: John Leahy .
Treasurer; James o Connor
Secretary: Tom Flavin
Committee: Ned Sheehy, John Murphy, Jerry Clancy, Jerry Enright, Maurice Stack, Willie o Connor, J. Hanrahan, Tim Scanlon, Jackie Goulding, James Ahean.Members: Sean Nolan, Jim Connor, Sean Broderick, Tom Kennelly, Denis Murphy, Rich Shanahon, Hugh Goulding, Christy Goulding, R. Stack.
The first meeting held on the 27th of December 1955.Mr S Seaney VS Castleisland attended and Mr. N. Horan chairman of the county exeulure of macra.
The church building fund was in progress at this time also.
Mr. J McNamara gave a lecture to the class on January 21st 1956 on his visit to Denmark. Described their methods and answered questions. They
Hoped at their next meeting to get a film show on farming methods,. Later reeplies from film operators stated that E.S.B. must be installed before they could show films. The department of agriculture asked farmers to dress cattle against warables and to castrate or slauter all male calves not intended for breeding immediately.
A public meeting also called to encourage the E.S.B.to come to the parish.
Macra social in Killarney on Dec 18th 1956 at ten schillings per ticket.
The branch also enquired the cost of Mr Walsh's hall in Listowel for a dance the fee was £22. On the 30th November 1957 the branch held a dance in Moyvane they also deceided to give £3 to the church building fund. Emmet Leahy also joined the club in 1956.
In Oct 23rd 1957 Dr Michael Brosnan asked the branch to do some thing for the kerryman's hostel in London. It was decided to hold a church gate collection for them.
More meetings were held with the E.S.B to encourage them to send an official canvasser to the parish, without result so local public representations were contacted to enlist their help.
Lectures were given by Mr R. F. Ryan on soil fertility, also Mr Fred Hayden national organiser for macra attended one of their meetings. He introduced debating to the club. March 12th 1957 James F. Nolan photographer attended and took photos for the farmers journal. Moyvane had a film show on the cow on 22nd Feb 1957 Mr McNamara agricultural instructor in charge of the film. The branches first film show was shown on Nov 19th 1957.They also put down concrete floor in the old hall and got seats from the old church in Moyvane to furnish it.

New members in 1957 were Jerry and Paddy Carroll, Willie Stack, and Philip Donovan. The branchs first outing was held on May 20th 1958 they visited Mitchelstown and the Ivan Allen farm. The branch also had a quotation for a bus from Knockanure to Limerick show for £19, not enough members were interested and the trip was canceled
In october the secretary wrote to the B.T.E office in Tralee to get lecture on TB.They also hired Bunny Dalton Band for a dance .Repairs to the Hall cost £12 ten Shillings .Many Dances were held over the years The Bands included The Western Star Band tickets for their Dance cost 3 shillings .The oConnell Band and another new pop Band called The Radar also played at dances .A discussion took place on staging a play .Fledged And Flown was chosen as their first play .That decision was made on March 9 th 1959.Members of the drama group went to see Sive in Listowel on May 13 th 1959 On the 22of Feb 1960 the Club wrote to the Minister for Posts and Tellegrafts asking him to erect a Public Phone Booth in the Village,It was also decided to ask the Council to erect Public Lights in the Village .A card game was planned for 24 th of Oct 1960 .First Prize £5 plus other Prizes.Lectures continued from time to time given by Local Instructor Mr Maurice Stack of Listowel .On sept 16 th 1965 the Club was told of a new Television Programme ,called Telefis Feirme . It was decided to apply for a T v set so that members could view the Programme .A short time later the Club was told that they were one of 5 in the County selected to receive a free T V set .Mansholdt came to Tralee in 1970 many from the Parish went to see and hear him in the Brandon Hotel . He predicted that the viable farmer would have 40 cows and do all the work himself .There was great excitement in Tralee on the night Mr Mansholdt gave his talk with anti Common Market protesters waving Placards and shouting slogans It appeared to be an organised protest with little local support .Inside in the Brandon Hall many questions were asked of Mr Mansholdt and the Minister for Agriculture
The final Story of Knockanure Macra Na Feirme is yet untold old Photos and Minute Books have been mislaid it is hoped to collect further details at a later date.

 

 

 



THE FAMINE
Folklore from Murhur school




In the year 1848 and 1849, the famine came to Ireland. Up to that time the Irish people had plenty of food. They had potatoes in abundance, plenty of pork, pickled beef, and ground their own corn at home so that each family was comfortably fixed. As usual in 1847 in the months of February and March each farmer set there own big garden of potatoes, but unfortunately the potato crop failed. The people started to eat the turnips and they had not even enough of them. The people grew sick and got all kinds of diseases including cholera. With that disease the people only lived a few days. They died in the fields and in the houses and several died on the roadsides. Big graves were made and all the bodies were piled in to together. An old woman in Listowel called Mrs. Hedderman said she remember seeing a light burning all night long to give light to the people who were burying the dead from night till morning.

The English sent over some seed and the Russians sent corn meal. The people did not know how to use it. They were mixing it with cold water and eating it. In addition, it killed some of them. Told by Nurse Stack aged 62 of Moyvane

Auction at Newtown sands on Thursday 30 Oct 1902 of 19 ac in four separate holdings of the late Rev M Dillon PP Newtown sands. East of road, north field, creamery field and bog garden. Any portion of fields needing drains have been drained by Fr Dillon.

Bits and Pieces

The Newtownsandes Creamery was established in 1895 was entitled to 18 years free rent after which £1.25 rent was payable.
Local auctioneer M.J. Nolan conducted the sale.

 

EMIGRATED: Edmund Dinneen went to America, his father Timothy is buried at Knockanure. Edmond had three sisters. Bridget Dinneen married Cornelius Mulvihill in 1862 and Catherine Dinneen married Roger Mulvihill in 1857.

The third sister, Mary, married Patrick Enright of Tarbert in 1860. A brother, John Dinneen, was living in Glenalappa in 1892, two other brothers, Dan and Michael, emigrated.


"St. Mary's County is where it all began," writes Thomas Spalding in the introduction to this book. "There was established the first Catholic parish, the first Catholic school, the first community of religious men in English-speaking America." Moreover, St. Mary's residents played a key role in the development of the Catholic Church throughout the whole of America, providing the spearhead of the westward expansion of Catholicism. In 1785, for example, the first of many Catholic families from St. Mary's crossed the mountains to find land in Kentucky, while a few years later, driven by economic necessity, others migrated to Georgia, Missouri, Louisiana, and Texas. So great was the number of St. Mary's Catholics who moved to Kentucky, in fact, that a diocese was created for them in 1808.

These early families left a mighty progeny, and those of us today who seek ancestral connections will welcome the appearance of this book, for here are collected many of the earliest surviving records of the Catholic families of St. Mary's County, Maryland. The most significant portion of the work contains the marriages and baptisms from the Jesuit parishes of St. Francis Xavier and St. Inigoes, which, in the case of baptisms (1767-1794), give the names of children, parents, and godparents, and the date of baptism; and in the case of marriages (1767-1784), the names of the married partners and the date of marriage. Other records include congregation lists (1768-1769), rent rolls (various dates), births (various dates), subscribers to the Oath of Allegiance (1778), militia lists (1794), and voters' lists (1789-1790).

Poor Law. The average size of the Irish Unions was about three times as large as the corresponding divisions in England. It is impossible for any board of guardians to manage efficiently, yet economically, a district of hundreds of thousands of acres. Out of 130 Unions in Ireland in 1847, 107 contained up-wards of 100,000 acres; and of these, 25 contained upwards of 200,000. In Munster and Connaught, where there was the greatest amount of distress, and the least amount of local intelligence available for its relief, the Unions were much larger than in the more favoured provinces of Ulster and Lein-ster. But it was in Cormaught that the over-grown bulk of these districts attained its greatest extent. The Union of Ballina, which contained a smaller number of persons fit to undertake its management than most of the other Unions in Ireland, comprised a tract of upwards of 507,000 acres; and here, in the deserts of Erris, distress wore its most appalling form. From several of the most suffering localities of this immense district, the poor-house was more than forty miles distant.* The great extent of the Unions, which naturally led to large electoral divisions, had also another injurious effect. It not merely left unrelieved the
* The size of the unions and electoral divisions has since been considerably reduced. A commission was appointed in the year 1848, to enquire what altera- tion might be beneficially made in the number and boundaries of the poor-law unions and electoral divisions in Ireland. The report of the commissioners, which

 

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pauperism which existed, but it ultimately in-creased its amount. One object which it was sup-posed would be gained by the poor-law was, that the landlords would be induced to employ the labour-ers on their estates, in order to prevent them from seeking support from the work-house. Instead of having this effect, the pressure of the poor-rates in-terfered with the employment of labour, by lessening the capital of the employers, while the great ex-tent of the electoral divisions rendered the expect-ed stimulus ineffective. It was very discouraging to a landlord, after spending a large sum in wages, and successfully exerting himself to keep his own tenantry out of the poor-house, to find that his tax-ation was not perceptibly lessened; that the estates of the non-resident proprietors in the same elec toral division, on which nothing had been expended,

was completed in Eighth-month, 1850, recommended an increase of 51 unions and 1478 electoral divisions, viz.:-

 

 

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This arrangement has not yet been fully carried into effect, but several new unions and electoral divisions have been formed in accordance with it; so that the present number of electoral divisions amounts to 3439, constituting 163 unions. Of these, there are only nine which exceed 200,000 acres. When the changes recommended by the commissioners are completed, the largest Union, that of Kenmare, will be 198,145 acres; and the largest electoral division, that of Glenco, in the union of Belmullet, 27,218 acres; the average size of the unions being 114,963 acres, and of the electoral divisions 5,908 acres.

 

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and which were rated on no higher scale than his, had sent in their swarm of paupers to devour the hard earnings of his self-denying industry. The restrictions which had previously existed on the importation of foreign grain had evidently an important influence on the condition of the people of Ireland. The natural laws which the All-wise Creator has impressed on human society, render us dependent on each other for the various wants of life. This dependance appears to apply in the case of nations as well as individuals. It is a wise and benevolent arrangement of Providence, that different countries should yield different valu-able products; and one of the effects apparently intended by this variety of production, arising from the variety of soil and climate, is the promotion of that friendly intercourse and exchange of commo-dities by which both parties are benefited. This intercourse tends to make nation better acquainted with nation, to remove prejudices, to counteract the disposition for war, and to bind together in one family the whole brotherhood of man. If the trade in corn had been free, and if the almost exclusive possession of the English market had not held out peculiar inducements for the culti-vation of wheat, we may presume that the attention of Irish farmers and landholders would have been given to other crops for which the soil and climate appear more peculiarly suited. Wheat would still have been grown, but the principal objects of the

 

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farmer's attention would have been oats, barley, green crops and flax; and even more care than heretofore would have been devoted to the rearing and fattening of cattle. The result would proba-bly have been the importation of wheat for the middle and upper classes; and of Indian corn for the use of the poor, and for the feeding of stock; while oats, barley, cattle, and flax, both raw and manufactured, would have been exported. A more extended commerce must consequently have existed with foreign countries. The price of food being allowed to sink to its natural level, would have placed bread and the other cereal products within the reach of a larger class of the people. The lower classes, being thrown less exclusively on the potato for support, would have consumed more oatmeal, and have learned the use of Indian corn; and for the distribution of these various articles of food, a larger number of dealers and a greater amount of internal trade would have been requisite. The want of a previously existing import trade in corn increased the difficulties of obtaining sup-plies from foreign countries. The restrictions were relaxed in the summer of 1846, and ceased entirely in the early part of 1847; but the effects they had produced could not be immediately removed. They had prevented the natural growth of trade, and a fully developed commerce could not at once be brought into perfect action. As soon as the B2

 

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demand for foreign supplies became urgent, a sud-den and general advance of freights took place. Vessels could not be obtained for less than double, and sometimes treble the ordinary rates. The difficulty and expense of importing food was thus greatly increased. "We are unable," wrote a valued American correspondent, in Second-month, 1847, "to send you all the food you require, for want of vessels. It is heart-rending to think that while our granaries are bursting with food, your poor people are starving." Under any circumstances, it is pro-bable that the failure of an important crop would have produced a considerable advance of freights, in the endeavour to supply the deficiency; but the advance would in all probability have been compa-ratively small, if a foreign trade in corn had already existed, and if the people of Ireland had been less dependant on the potato for support. After a short time, the high freights produced their natural effect of attracting large quantities of shipping to the con-veyance of corn, so that freights fell even below their former rates. The great increase in the consumption of corn required a larger amount of grinding power than had been previously in use. This produced a difficulty in some places, although the Govern-ment mills in England, and many mills in Ireland which had not been worked for a long time before, were employed for this purpose. The want of local dealers in food was also seriously felt in. many

 

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parts of the country; it increased the necessity of public relief, and rendered the exertions for relief less effective, than if this natural machinery for the distribution of food had already existed. The Indian meal imported was also at first much less useful than it would have been, if the people had been previously accustomed to it, and had known how to cook it. Its excellence as food depends greatly upon the manner in which it is prepared; and the people, especially in the west districts, had little experience in the preparation of any food except the potato; and were unable to cook the Indian meal so as to render it either as wholesome or as palatable as it might have been. Hence they conceived a prejudice against it, as an inferior and unwholesome kind of food. Indian meal is used by all classes in the United States, and in this country its consumption has greatly in-creased already; it is therefore reasonable to sup-pose that the Irish would not have neglected it, if they had had opportunities, under ordinary cir-cumstances, of becoming gradually acquainted with its value. It could not have displaced the potato in the poorer districts of the west or south, where, from the difficulty of obtaining employment, and the absence of money wages, the peasantry for the most part lived on the produce of their own potato gardens; but it would probably have been used, to some extent, at least by the poor in those parts of

 

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the country where the people were supported by wages paid in money. When the first and more partial failure of the po-tato occurred in 1845, the Government introduced a large supply of Indian corn. This was done with as little publicity as possible, in order not to dis-turb the usual course of trade. The corn was distributed through the Commissariat depots in various parts of the country. Such an attempt to introduce a new and cheap substitute for the potato, was perhaps the best measure which could have been adopted in this emergency, to obviate the injurious consequences of preceding legislation. In consequence of remonstrances in parliament respecting this action of the Government, the Treasury minute of "August 31st, 1846," was is-sued. By this minute, Government interference was confined to the western parts of Ireland, where very little trade in corn for local consump-tion had as yet existed. This proceeding did not check the operations of the existing trade in other localities, but it doubtless had some effect in re-tarding the growth of a new one, in those very dis-tricts where it was most required. Any adminis-trative interference with the natural course of commerce produces an apparent necessity for its continuance. The original restrictions on the im-portation of corn led to the interfereace in 1845; and the interference in 1845 rendered some repeti-tion in 1846 almost unavoidable.

 

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We have thus noticed some peculiarities in the condition of Ireland before the blight fell upon the potato, and have endeavoured to show their influ-ence in aggravating the consequent distress. A great part of the population were living in a state of extreme poverty. he laws relating to land were such as to discourage any general attempt at improvement. A large proportion of the land-lords were embarrassed, and in many instances they had ceased to reside on their property. The extent of land under the management of receivers ap-pointed bv the courts had increased to an alarming degree. From the poverty of the people living on potatoes grown in their own gardens, there were in many districts no retail dealers in food. Indian meal, which would have been an excellent substitute for the potato, had been so long systematically ex-cluded, that its use was unknown and its value dis-regarded. The poor-law contained no principle of expansion capable of meeting such a difficulty. Many of those who should have administered it were far away. The extent of the unions rendered the due administration of relief impracticable; while the poor-law taxation, by diminishing the funds applicable to the payment of labour, increased the amount of pauperism. Some of these circumstances appear to us to have been among the most influential causes of that depressed condition of the Irish peasantry, which forced so many of them to depend on the potato

 

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alone for their subsistence; and this exclusive dependance on a single article of food greatly aggravated the consequences of the fearful blight of the potato; so that, while other countries expe-rienced the mitigated evils of a scarcity, we had to endure the intense sufferings of a famine.

 

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CHAPTER II FAILURE OF THE POTATO CROP- FORMATION AND ARRANGEMENTS OF THE RELIEF COMMITTEE.
PARTIAL failures of the potato, and severe conse-quent distress in particular localities, have been of frequent occurrence in Ireland. The summer months were generally a time of considerable trial and privation to the peasantry; as the old potatoes were frequently exhausted before the new crop had come in, and the demand for agri-cultural labour at that season was usually slack. Any partial failure of the crop increased this dis-tress; and on account of the poverty of the con-sumers, and the costliness of the carriage of so bulky an article, the abundance in one part could rarely be made available to supply the deficiency in another. On three occasions prior to 1845, the distress thus caused amounted to famine. In the year 1739, a severe and early frost destroyed the potatoes in the ground, and very great suffering ensued. Considerable neglect of tillage appears to have taken place in the following spring, and the distress was thus prolonged for two years. Fever and dysentery, the invariable effects of famine, succeeded, and raged with unusual vio-


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lence in 1741. These diseases were peculiarly fatal, not only to the peasantry but also to the wealthier classes, and many persons of high social position were carried off by them. Considerable efforts were made in Ireland to alleviate the dis-tress. A large quantity of corn was imported from America, and soup kitchens were established throughout the country. It does not appear that this famine obtained much notice in Great Britain, or in any foreign country. Another period of distress occurred in 1822. The preceding season had been unusually wet, and the potatoes rotted after they had been stored in the pits. The loss was, therefore, not ascertained until the season was considerably advanced. The distress was very severely felt in all the western counties of Minister and Connaught. Fever soon appeared, and aggravated the sufferings of the people. The amount of distress produced extraor-dinary exertions to alleviate it. A committee was formed in Dublin, and sat at the Mansion House. The Lord Lieutenant placed at their disposal a con-siderable sum, which under former acts of parlia-ment had been left in his hands, and they received upwards of £31,000 in subscriptions. Central com-mittees were formed in the principal towns, and sub-committees in the several parishes of the distressed districts; and great exertions were made in the dis-tribution of relief. Parliament voted £300,000 for public works and other relief purposes, and also

 

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appropriated £15,000 to facilitate emigration from the south of Ireland to the Cape of Good Hope. The announcement of this visitation excited much sympathy in England. A committee was formed in London, and subscriptions to the amount of £310,000 were raised. Of this sum, about £44,000 was collected in Ireland. A plentiful harvest ren-dered a continuance of their labours unnecessary, and it was then found that they had a balance in hands amounting to £77,074. This sum was sub-sequently granted to various societies, which had been established with a view to promote the permanent improvement of the people of Ireland.* In 1831, violent storms and heavy rains brought

 

 

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upon the west of Ireland another failure of tbe potato, with its usual accompaniments of famine and pestilence. The distress principally affected the coasts of Galway, Mayo, and Donegal; but it was partially felt in other districts. On this occa-sion the potato had failed while in the ground, and the pressure was felt as early as the First-month of 1832, The English public, with ready sympathy, again came forward, and two committees were form-ed in London. The entire amount of subscriptions which these committees collected was £74,410. In Dublin, two committees were also organized; one at the Mansion-house, the other in Sackville-street. Their united collections amounted to upwards of

 

 

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£30,000. Government also advanced £40,000, part of which was expended on public works, and part in the actual distribution of food. On this occasion also a plentiful harvest followed, and the distress was immediately relieved.* On several other occasions, subsequently to 1831, the Government found it necessary to advance money for the relief of distress. The aggregate amount of these advances was not very great, and public attention was not in any particular way attracted to the subject.+ The first appearance of the fatal blight on the

 

 

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potato, which has since been so severely felt, was in the year 1845. Late in the autumn of that year, it was found that the potatoes were rotting. The early crop had been saved, but throughout the whole country a considerable portion of the late crop was lost. Much apprehension was excited, and a Government commission was appointed to investigate the nature and origin of the disease; but all their enquiries proved unsuccessful, and its causes continue to the present time to elude human research. The distress, however, was not very great. The yield had been unusually plentiful, so that the portion that remained was considerable. The grain crop had also been abundant. Strong hopes were entertained that the scarcity would be followed, as on other occasions, by a year of plenty. In the summer of 1846, the potatoes looked re-markably well, and there appeared every prospect of an abundant harvest, when it pleased an over-ruling Providence that almost the whole crop should be destroyed in one week. The failure of the potato was not the only loss. The wheat was barely an average crop, and the barley and oats were deficient. The money value of the loss in potatoes and oats was computed by the Government to amount to sixteen millions sterling. The announcement of this dreadful calamity did not at first produce the alarm which might have been expected. The idea of millions being reduced to starvation was too great to be quickly realised. Many believed

 

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that the accounts of the failure were exaggerated, while others who knew that the crop was lost, per-suaded themselves that the consequences would not be so very serious. It was not long before all such doubts and hopes were dispelled. The ac-counts which came in from every part of the country gave full proof of the awful calamity of impending famine. A deep sympathy was aroused, and great anxiety prevailed to do something to relieve the rapidly increasing distress. As far back as the beginning of 1846, nearly £14,000 had been subscribed at Calcutta, when the intelligence of the partial failure of 1845 had reached India. The distribution of this sum, under the name of the Indian Relief Fund, commenced on the 24th of Fourth-month, 1846, and continued during the remainder of the year. The earliest association formed in consequence of the failure of 1846, was the Irish Relief Association, whose meetings were held in Upper Sackville-street. This society, whose exertions in the famine of 1831 have been already noticed, was reorganised on the 2nd of Ninth-month, 1846. The subscriptions re-ceived by them exceeded £42,000. The General Central Relief Committee, over which the Marquis of Kildare presided, was formed on the 29th of Twelfth-month. The contributions placed under their care amounted to upwards of £83,000, in-cluding a grant of £20,000 made to them by the British Relief Association. In the distressed dis-

 

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tricts Government offered to double the local sub-scriptions; and although many of the gentry, and others who could afford to do so, had liberally subscribed in the spring of 1846 to relieve the distress which then existed, they again responded with much liberality to the appeal made in the au-tumn of the same year. It is impossible to estimate the sacrifices and even privations, to which many of every class in Ireland cheerfully submitted, in their efforts to relieve the distress which surrounded them. In England, when the extent of the calamity was ascertained, a great and general sympathy was excited. The British Association for the relief of the extreme distress in Ireland and Scotland, was formed in First-month, 1847. The total amount of subscriptions received by them exceeded £470,000. Ladies also formed associations in different parts of Great Britain, some for supplying clothing, and some for promoting industrial occupations amongst the female peasantry. Before any committee was form-ed, as well as for a long time after, a large amount of private contribution was poured into every part of the country, chiefly through the agency of the clergy of the Established Church. It is not our province to record the noble self-denial shown in individual cases, or to narrate the unwearied exertions of the different associations in collecting subscriptions and distributing relief; yet we cannot avoid this passing allusion to these exertions, whilst relating our own part in the transactions of that eventful period, and

 

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rendering an account of the execution of the trust confided to us. On the 13th of Eleventh-month, 1846, a meeting of members of the Society of Friends was convened in Dublin, to consider what steps were proper for them to take, and whether it was better for them to form a separate organisation, or to unite in a gene-ral effort. They determined on the former course, and agreed to form a Central Relief Committee in Dublin. The objects of this Committee were to raise a fund by subscriptions, which they might dis-tribute where relief was particularly needed; and to obtain authentic information respecting the cha-racter of the distress in the different localities, in order that the best means might be devised for its alleviation. For this purpose, twenty-one persons were then named, with power to add to their num-ber; to fill up vacancies from time to time, should they occur ; and to seek the co-operation of mem-bers of the Society of Friends in other parts, who should be associated as corresponding members, and should deliberate and act jointly with them as occasion might arise. In the selection of this Committee, care was taken to include some whose commercial pursuits had brought them into inter-course with distant parts of the country; for great difficulty occurred at the very outset, as to the agency by which relief could be administ

 

 

 

BOSTON PILOT

Hi, I'm from Ontario Canada. I'm having a little difficulty understanding what exactly Newtownsandes is. Is it a town, or a church parish or an area of land similar to our townships here in Ontario?

My great grandfather, John Sweeney and his wife Margaret O'Connor immigrated from Newtownsandes around 1847. I think Margaret's mothers name was Catherine Sheehy.

Thanks for taking time to read my email, hope to hear from you, sincerely, Donna (Sweeney) Lowry

 

Boston Pilot
Information Wanted Ads

12 July 1856.

Of JAMES GRANT, who left Listowel [co. Kerry] 6 years ago. - Please address
his brother, Michael Grant, Wappelo, Louisa County, Iowa.

 

Knockanure Teachers
Samuel Lewis in 1830 reports Knockanure had a small Thatched Church with a School attached, Griffith Valuation 1850 John Byrne had school valuation 10 shillings,
Michael Mulvihill had school c 1834, Also hedge school at Trien and at Connors Gortdromagowna,
1868 to 1873 teachers Casey, Keane & Molyneaux,
Boys school records burnt when school went on fire,

 

1874 to 1917 Maurice Casey, to 1923 Jer Carroll, to 1903 Elizabeth O Mahony, to 1918 Tim Sullivan, Later Hartnett for a short time, to 1919 Joan Flaherty, to 1923 Mary Mc Mahon, to 1928 Tom Callaghan, to 1933 Julia Flaherty, to 1953 Paddy Callaghan, to 1957 Miss J J Horan, to 1968 Miss M O Callaghan, to 1969 Cormac O Leary, to 1965 Kate Finucane, to 1972 Mairead O Callaghan, to 1990 Mary O Carroll,

Moyvane Murhur Teachers
1850's
John Shanahan, Margaret Lawlor, Elizabeth & Alice Madden, Tom Enright, David White, Pat Shine, Elizabeth McCarthy c1863, Denis Connor, John Rourke, Jim Barry came 1880, Tom Carr, Dan Mulvihill,

Girls' School

Joan Hederman to 1889, Bridget Shine to 1880, Joan Fitzmaurice to 1885, Lizzie Gleeson to 1926, Nora Scanlon to 1934, Elizabeth Nolan to 1946, Bridie Barrett to 1958, Mary B O Connell to 1964, Mary O Carroll to 1964,

Boys School
Some teachers: Robert Jones c1901, Dan Mulvihill & John O Rourke to 1904, Maurice O Claochlaighe to 1941, Joe Moriarty to 1930, Kathleen Mulvihill to 1945,Tim Buckley to 1941, Tom o Connell to 1944, Mary Shine to 1939, Sean Barrett to 1954, Padraig O Sullivan to c193?, Cormac O Leary to 1953, Mary B O Callaghan to 1971, Noel O Connell to 1961,

Kilbaha
Tom O Callaghan 1929 to 1944, Mary B Dineen 1929 to 1945, Mary Collins to c1951, Dorothy O Sullivan to 1964,

Aughrim School c1850 under The Church Education Society & Rev R Fitzgerald,

Samuel Lewis in 1830 reports: Near Newtownsandes Large School House erected at the expense of Fr J Long PP. The Board of Education allows £12 per year to support the School.


Knockanure School Girls c1890.

Brid Ahern, Mary Ahern, Mary Ahern, Ellie Ahern, Mag Ahern, Brid Buckley, Mgt Buckley, Eliz Buckley, Kate Buckley, Kate Broderick, Mary Broderick, Brid Broderick, Mary A Buckley, Kate Brosnan, Han Buckley, Mary Brosnan, N Broderick, Ellie Broderick, Ellie Barry, Joan Barry, Mgt Broderick, Mary Buckley, Nora Buckley, Han Collins, Mary Carroll, Mgt Collins, Ann Carroll, Mary Connor, Brid Costelloe, Mgt Connor, Han Connell, Ellen Costelloe, Brid Carroll, Julia Cronin, Jna Costelloe, Julia Collins, Mgt Collins, Mgt Cronin, Nano Cronin, Mary Custelloe, Ellen Connor, Mgt Custaloe, Nano Connor, Nora Connor, Kate Connor, Brid Carroll, Jna Connor, Mary Carmody, Mgt Connell, Brid Creed, Mary and Kate Costelloe, Kate and Brid Connor, Mary Doolin, Mary Dowd, Mary Drewry, Kate and Jna Dillon, Mary Dee, Nora and Mgt and Ellie Dillon, Kate and Bridget Driscoll, Mary Dore, Mgt Dee, Mary ,Jna and Brid Donaghue, Ann Dowd, Mgt Dore, Cath, Mgt, Ellen, Han, Brid, Jna, and Mary Enright, Ellie Egan, Mgt Egan, Mgt and Kate Enright, Jna Flaherty, Han Fitzgerald, Mary Fealy, Nora and Jna Flaherty, Mgt, Mary, Liz, and Ellen Fitzgerald, Brid Flaherty, Kate Fealy, Brid Fitzgerald, Han Fitzgerald, born c1886, Han and Cath Flaherty, Mary and Mgt Finucane, Mary Fitzmaurice, .

Knockanure National School Opened 26-4-1874.

Teachers c 1890 were Julia Flaherty, Joan Mc Mahon, and Mrs Casey.

Notes taken at National School Exhibition held in Listowel.
Nora Shanahan, born 1914 Clounmacon, Mary Walsh Beale born 1919.Ann Moloney Castlegrace Co Tipperary born 1916.Peggie O Dell born 1922, Rita Shine Creamery Managers daughter. Sarah Barry Newtownsandes came in 3rd Class, Mgt Barry b1916. Joan Horan and her sister came to Knockanure their Guardian a Pensioner.

Noreen Hayes School Teacher Knockalucka 1926. Mary Kennelly Shopkeepers daughter 15-10-1918 in 5th Class. Mgt Horgan and K Sullivan at Knockanure School 1931, and 1941 respectively . Mary Synan b1924, Mgt Synan b1922. Mary Kennelly Finuge 1915. Nora and Mary Kennelly born Finuge 1915 .

 

Knockanure Tithe List c1825.
Keylod and Gortaglanna
John Sweeney ,John Sandes, Tom Connor, John Moran, Con Keane, Pat Moore, Tom Kelly, John Goulding, ? ? ,Tim Ahern, ? Connor, James Leahy, John Goulding, ? Moloney, ? ? , Mc Mahon, Tom & George & John Sandes, James Nash.

Carrueragh And Coilagurteen

Denis Mahony, Tom Lister, Fitzgerald & Dore, Widow Larkin, Francis Carroll, David & ? Flynn, Tom Nolan, Joe Sweeney, Widow Stack, Garrett Stack, John Relihan, Pat Stack, Wm. Connor, John Griffin, Tim Leahy, John & Widow Leahy, Tom Costelloe .

Kilmeaney
Geo Gun, Mrs Raymond, Widow Sullivan, Ml & Widow Relihan, ? Pope, Wm. Moore, D Finucane, John & Phil Costelloe, Pat & Dl Burns. Buckley & Finucane, Ml & John Costelloe.

Gortdromagowna

John Kelly, James Fitzgerald ? ,John Cregan, John Mc Mahon, Ml & Tom Mulvihill, John Buckley, Ml Scanlon, Widow Stack O Connor, Widow Connor & Son, Dl & Eamon Griffin, Tom & John Connor, Wm. Stack, Tom Mulvihill, Rob & Tim Leigh, Widow Sullivan , Dl & P Connor & W Buckley, Tim Leahy , Darby Connor.

 

 

Knockanure 1850 Index


Gortdromagowna.

Ml Moore, Tom Kelly, Mgt Sandes, Tom Connors, Sylv Casey, John Connors , Jer Connors, Hugh Golden, Tom Woulfe, Lar Buckley, John Buckley, Mary Connors, Tim Flaherty, Jer Kennelly, Jer Carroll, Wm. Moore, Mce Neville, Jer Golden, John Golden, John Connors, Jas Connors, Con Connors, Tom Lyons, Robert Hunt, Cath Stoke, Ml Hunt, Tim Hunt, Denis & Dan Sullivan, Wm. Flaherty.

Keylod

Ml Connors, John Sandes, Church, Pat Keane, John Byrne, Mary Dillane, Tom Moore, Mary Moore, Cath Connors, John Moran, Cath Connors, Wm. Sandes, John Golden, Batt Connors, Pat Byrne, Ml Nash, Tom Langan, Ml McCormick, Jer Dillane, Cath Lindsay, Ellen Enright, Ml Golden, John Kelly, Ed Dillane, James Dore, Ellen Mulvihill, John Stokes.

Carrueragh

Pierce Mahony, Mary Dore, John Kennelly, John Callahan, Rob Mahony, Dan Nolan, Con Costelloe, Tim Moloney, Ellen Larkin, Jas Larkin, Jas Leahy, Pat Stack, Pat Keane, John Flynn, John Doody, Tom Stack , Cath Stack, Pat Stack, John & Mary Nolan, Ml Dore, Garrett Stack, Tim , James & John Leahy, Wm. Lynch, Tim Madigan, Tom Leahy, Sarah Nolan, Joe Sweeney, Mary Nolan, Nora Finucane, Ml Relihan, Dan Carroll, John Carroll, Mary Enright , Mary Carroll, John Enright, John, Tom & Ellen Costelloe, Tom Corridan, John Relihan, Joan Pierce, Martin Enright.

Beenanasbig

Nora Connors, Mce Connors, Bridget Moore, John Stokes, Wm. Leahy, Tom Mahony, Ellen Mulvihill.

Kilmeaney

Tim Jones, Mary Kelly, Ml Stack, John Kelly, Dan Cronin, John Scannell, Stephen Pope, John Murphy, Ml Scanlon, Wm. Moore, Wm. Lunham, Tom Paradine, John Relihan, Tom Finucane.

Trien.

Pierce Mahony, Tom Sullivan, Nora Mc Mahon, John ,Dan & Denis Lyons, John Carroll.

Shanacool : Wm. Lunham.


Lissaniskea

John Sandes, Tom Connors, Batt Connors, John Connors, John Leahy, Tom Leahy, Grave Yard, John Connors, Wm. Leahy, Ml Connors, Con Lyons, Pat Hanrahan, Pat Kelly, Wm. Sandes, Terence, Tim & Johanna Mc Mahon, Pat Buckley, Pat Carroll.

 


Notes April 12th 01
Kilmorna born Priest Monsignor Tom Moloney died 16th April 1986.
He went to San Diego in 1946. In 1955 his Bishop asked him to start a new Parish in Riverside where Fr Moloney Est. Our Lady Of Perpetual Help Church, supervised the construction of a new School, Convent Church and Rectory. His Grandmother was Hudson of Kilbaha.

2001 : Fr William Moloney born 160 yrs ago son of Tadhg Moloney and Kate Enright of Coilagurteen. Fr Moloney spent his life ministering on the Gold Dust Trails. He died at Sutter Creek 1903.

 


DILLON PATRICK

Born 17 March 1850
Ordained 25 June 1876
Died

Born - Janemount, Kerry, Ireland.
Seminary Education - Maynooth
Ordained - Maynooth.

1876 Seminary of Pastoral Theology
1877-1878 Mount Carmel, Salford.
1879 St Mary's Bolton.

PV1-159 states he was not affiliated. Not in 1880 Almanac, presumably recalled to his own Diocese.

DALY PATRICK

Born September 1857
Ordained 15 August 1881
Died 25 June 1910

Born at Duagh in Co Kerry, Ireland, Fr Daly was educated St Brendan's College, Killarney and the Irish College at Salamanca, Spain. With the permission of the Bishop of Kerry, he came to the Salford diocese in 1880 for five years, but was considered too young for ordination. He was ordained in 1881, and appointed assistant at St Anne, Blackburn, 1881-1888. He was then appointed founder rector of the new mission of St Joseph, Longsight, Manchester, which replaced the mass centre operating in the Industrial School founded by Fr Quick. In late 1909 his health gave way, and he died of a painful disease in June 1910. Fr Daly had a nephew and great nephew as priests in the Diocese.
23 Nov 2000
Death has taken place of Sister Loretto Flaherty born 1918 daughter of Ned and Catherine Flaherty of Tubbertureen. Sr. Loretto joined Sisters of Charity of Jesus and Mary in 1937 she spent a lifetime working at Holymount Lancashire her passing will bring sadness to all who knew her.

June 21st 01
Death of Fr Edward Godfrey born Farranfore son of James Godfrey and Elizabeth O Connor of The Hill Knockanure.Fr Edward is survived by Brothers Jim and Tom Sister Mary Shine, he was predeceased by brothers Fr Jerome CSSp and Dr Lawrence and sister Nancy Quinlan. Fr E Godfrey was Parish Priest of St Gregory's Liverpool. He was laid to rest at Rath Cemetery after a long life serving the Church.

The Art of Manliness
How Manly Men Can Fight Poverty

Posted: 14 Oct 2008 11:28 PM CDT

 

Editor's Note: Today is Blog Action Day and AoM is taking part. Blog Action Day is an annual nonprofit event that aims to unite the world's bloggers, podcasters and videocasters, in posting about the same issue on the same day. The goal is to raise awareness and trigger a global discussion about that issue. This year's issue is poverty.

The first time I was really confronted with poverty on a consistent basis was when I lived in Tijuana, Mexico for two years as a missionary for my church. For a white kid (well, a tan white kid) who grew up in an affluent American town, the experience was an eye opener. For the first time, I saw all the ugly effects of poverty first hand: drug and alcohol abuse, prostitution, child neglect, sickness, and crime.

While I was in Tijuana, I saw several church groups from California cross the border with the goal of alleviating poverty. They'd come with bags of used clothes, toys, and handouts of free food. Heck, they'd even build people new homes for free! While their intentions were noble, their efforts did little to help the people. In a day or two the food was gone and in a week or two the free toys were lying untouched on the dirt street. But the people still didn't have enough money to buy clean water or food for their families. And those people who got new homes? As soon as the church groups left, some of these new homeowners dismantled their houses and sold the materials for money. Others, who kept their homes, failed to take care of them properly and they quickly deteriorated. Within a matter of months, those brand new houses were indistinguishable from the other run down shacks.

But during my time in TJ, I met several families who were able to beat the poverty cycle. As I look back at these people, they all had two things in common that helped them get out of poverty: self-determination and responsible help from others. I never saw one without the other.

One family stands out to me. The husband was basically a bum. He drank his days away and worked odd jobs that paid a pittance. He couldn't provide for his family and they often went hungry. This bum happened to attend the same church as a man who owned several taxies that ran in Tijuana. The taxi owner knew the bum husband and the problems he had. The taxi owner took the guy under his wing and worked with him on getting his life in order. With a bit of tough love, this guy turned his life around completely. It took a lot of hard work and a lot of setbacks, but he had the determination to make a better life for his family The taxi owner soon offered the newly transformed man a job as a taxi driver in Tijuana. For the first time in this man's life he had steady work that allowed him to provide comfortably for his family. He was able to escape poverty.

Grit and determination will only get you so far when you're battling poverty. I saw men in Tijuana who worked their asses off at two jobs, but their situation never improved. It wasn't until someone stepped in and provided better resources and opportunities that these men's situations got better.

Likewise, all the help in the world won't do any good unless the person has the desire to accept the help and do something constructive with it. As they say, you can lead a horse to water, but you can't make it drink. So just providing handouts won't cut it, like the misguided church groups did above. At some point the impoverished person must make the decision to get out of poverty. And they might need some help to see that they even have a choice. Some people have been so beaten down by poverty that they don't have confidence or self determination to rise up from it.

Don't get me wrong. I'm not naïve enough to think that self determination and help from others will beat poverty every time. Some places in the world have such corrupt governments and extreme environments that Herculean efforts and all of Warren Buffet's money can't possibly eradicate all of the poverty there. But individuals don't have much influence over those factors. I think it's much more constructive to focus on things we can have a direct and immediate influence on.

And a final thing I learned while I was in Mexico is that it isn't the big Herculean efforts that beats poverty. Big government programs, huge benefit concerts, or even Blog Action Days don't do much to help people get out of poverty. It's done one person at a time.

How to Kick Poverty's Ass
How can we as men help kick poverty's ass? Here are a few suggestions.

1. Become a mentor. You don't need to go halfway across the world to fight poverty. Opportunities exist right in your backyard. Become a mentor to a disadvantaged young person in your community. Young people are stuck in a cycle of poverty. Their parents are poor, and thus often don't know how to motivate their kids to seek higher education and a better life for themselves. And the kids then follow their parents' example, have their own kids, and raise them the same way. By becoming someone's mentor, you can step in and break that cycle. You can provide the guidance and counsel that they may not get at home or from their friends. You can help them develop the skills that will enable them to become self-sufficient. Keep in mind that being a mentor is a long term commitment. Expect to be in it to win it for months or even years. The investment will be well worth it for the person and for you. Check out Big Brothers or your local community center. Or look for a way to volunteer in your area's schools.

2. Offer a free class to impoverished people. It's not the politically correct thing to say, but it is oftentimes the lifestyle of impoverished people that keeps them poor. In many cases, they lack basic life skills that we often take for granted. Things like showing up to appointments on time, basic grooming, and interpersonal skills might be lost on them. Most communities and states have agencies that teach people these skills. Many are hurting for teachers. Make a call and volunteer some time.

3. Donate a suit. The other day, I heard on the radio about an organization that collects gently used suits for impoverished men to wear at a job interview. I think that's a damn good idea. Check out Dress For Success and see how you can donate your old suit to help a fellow man.

4. Join Americorps. Have you recently graduated from college and find yourself drifting, unsure of what you want to do next? Consider joining Americorps. Americorps is one of the best kept secrets in the country. Americorps is like a domestic Peace Corps in which men and women dedicate themselves to a year of full-time service (although there are some part-time opportunities as well). Americorps is an umbrella for thousands of different programs, from those that tutor elementary students to those that work with the elderly. After the very me-centered time of college, Americorps will give you a chance to completely dedicate yourself to improving the lives of other people.

5. Join an international relief organization. If you're wanting to help battle poverty on an international level, join up with an international relief organization. You'll have the chance to get on the ground and help people directly. You could be involved with classes that teach water purification, sanitation, and farming. Or you could instruct people on how to run a business. Stuff that will help individuals become self sufficient and on the road to beating poverty. Many churches have international relief programs. If you're not a church person, check out Peace Corps or UNICEF.

6. Donate to a micro loan. Studies have shown that just giving countries money doesn't do anything to alleviate poverty. The money gets lost through graft and the inefficiency of bureaucracies. Why not put the money directly in the hands of the people you're trying to help so they can help themselves? Micro loans do just that. Your $50 or $100 loan can help some man in Africa start their own business. You'll be giving the help a person needs to become self-sufficient.

 

 

 

 

Extracts from State Papers famine years.
Listowel union report 1847 works selected for Paupers. Breaking stones on the public road. Fencing and renewing fencing on new roads. Scraping and cleaning the streets of Listowel. Collecting and breaking stones. Stewards Michael Maher , Dillane and Pat Carroll stewards wages 1s-6d per day .The opinion of the committee is that Paupers will be given food before calling on them to work . If they refuse to work they shall be struck off the relief lists . Hammers to be provided by the Board for breaking stones, Stewards responsible if any of them are lost. Spades and shovels to be provided by the paupers themselves. Edward Ware of Ballylongford sent a letter to the Lord Lieuteant asking for Relief for the Destitute Poor and Indignant people of Ballylongord they Needed some Relief and Assistance to Keep the alive as Coffins cannot be Purchased for the numbers dropping from famine and Distress Captain Spark visited Ballylongford in Feb 1848 to make inquiries about the condition of the people following the letter from Ware. He went to the Parish Priest Rev D Mc Carthy his curate Rev Mahony and the Local Dispensary Doctor. They told Capt. Spark that the statement of Mr Ware was false 3 or 4 have died in Ballylongford town since Christmas. 2 were poor aged and were receiving relief. It was noted that Mr Edward Ware was taken off the relief list because he refused to Work he is now employed By Mr Blacker the Landlord. Mr John Blacker is employing the poor on his Estate doing work of Improvement at this time.
Aug 12 1848
Captain spark Report on the Potatoe Crop in Newtownsandes Ballylongford and other Areas in North Kerry.It is Considered that 0.333 of the early sown Potatoe crop could be saved if there are dug in time. The late sown crop was a failer. Many Fields have sound Tubers not Affected by Blight.Oats and Barley look well. Wheat looks thin and weak. Corn Sowing was down a half to 0.33 from Previous years. The corn crop will be jeopardised if the weather continues to be wet. Turnips and other Green crops look well but little sown in this area.
Tarbert

Tarbert is five Miles from Ballylongford and four Miles from Glin.
Contains about 9164 acres

The O Connors came c1200

Kilnaughtin Church built in the 14th century was the old Parish Church of Tarbert.

c1450 Darmait O Conchobhair (he built Lislaughtin Abbey) was blinded and maimed while being a prisoner of the Earl of Desmond. The Earl's of Desmond lost their power 1582.

John O Connor of Tarbert was hanged and beheaded in Tralee 1652. He was called John of the Wine.
The fifth Lord of Tarbert was Thomas Mc Teige O Connor lost his land with the Cromwellian confiscations.


Patrick Crosbie was granted Tarbert in 1609 he brought tenant families with him Kelly's, Moore's, Dowling's, Doran's, Lawler's and several more families, about 290 people.

In 1666 Tarbert was in the hands of John Cooper.

Tarbert House the residence of the Leslie family since 1690. It is a Queen Anne Georgian house. Sir Edward Leslie had a visit from Benjamin Franklin c 1780. Others who visited Tarbert House include Jonathan Swift, the great Dan O Connell, Lord Kitchener {was baptised at Aghavallen in 1850}, Winston Churchill, Charlotte Bronte Thackeray, Charles Smith, Arthur Young 1776, Binns in c1836 and many more.
History of the Leslie family is available.

Captain Robert Leslie sold his Estate in Tarbert to his tenants in 1904.

Robert Leslie was Captain of the local Yeomanry in the early 1800's.
Pierce Leslie of the Kerry Militia died 1872.

Paul Jones was being pursued by War Ships during American war of Independence his sailors put lanterns hanging from a tree to resemble a ship at anchor and in the dark of night slipped down the Shannon and out to sea evading pursuing warships.

E A Sandes born 1851 died 1934 established 30homes for soldiers.


1893 on the 15th of August a boat owned by Maurice Murphy sank on its way home to Tarbert from a days outing to Clare. Seventeen young people were drowned . The inquest was held in Tarbert Courthouse.

On Massey's Hill half mile from Tarbert is a 17th century star fort .
In Tarbert Island a battery was built in early 19th century to command Tarbert Race on the opposite shore in Clare another battery was built.

1764 Crosby gave the go ahead for the Mail Road,
Salt House in Tarbert 1778, two and half Stone of wheat cost six shillings in 1800,
First Concrete House built in 1857 by Michael Naughton
Russell Store opened 1843,
St Mary's Built in 1833, Tarbert a separate Parish since 1859,
Bridewell built 1831, Light House built 1835, Pier construction started 1837,
Tarbert Workhouse 1851 Census, females 365, males 264.
Old School built by Fr Foley in 1868, 1834 four Schools were operating in locality,
St Ita's College 1940 to 1973,
Comprehensive opened 1973
Bishop Fitzmaurice (uncle of Frank Wall founder of ICMSA) died 1962
Work started on the Power Station in 1966, over 700 employed in its construction. The design of the power station was done by the ESB.

Car Ferry started 1969 opened a gateway between North Kerry and West Clare.

Died in 1967 Dr Thomas Mc Greevy.
T M O Connor who lived in the Square was a Co Councillor and businessman.

Lislaughtin Abbey that was established by O Connor for the Franciscans is about 5 miles from Tarbert situated just outside Ballylongford. The Lislaughlin Cross is in the National Museum. Carrigafoyle castle a short distance away another O Connor stronghold . It was garrisoned by 50 Irish and 16 Spanish soldiers who were put to death in March 1580 when it was taken after a two day fight with English soldiers under William Phelan . Cromwellian soldiers finally ruined the castle.
The Royal Irish Academy has old manuscripts of the following Michael O Longáin, George Fitzgerald, Tadhg Ruadh O Connor, Fr Jeremiah O Shea, Dore and Mahony.

Tom Langan alias Captain Steel was sent to Australia after 1798

Some Tarbert Priests
Liam Murphy, Michael Murphy OFM, Maurice Flynn Carmelite?, Fr. Foley Salesian, Dan Finucane d 1964, Paddy Holly CSSR, Liam Mulcahy, Tim Enright CSSR, Tim & Martin Buckley CSSR Ordained 1951 & 1957, Tim Buckley d 1977, Jack Buckley USA, William Ahern Ord. 1900,John O Connor, Philip O Connell, James & Tom O Hanlon, Willie & John Walsh, James O Sullivan USA, J E O Connor d1934, Richard Fitzmaurice Kenmare PP 1819- 38,William Burns OMI d1956, John Naughton d1882,
Charles O Connor Spa of Tarbert decent, Michael Fallon NSW his grandmother of Tarbert, Archbishop Of Dublin Liam Joseph Walsh 1885-1921 his biography written by Fr P J Walsh in 1928, Archbishops ancestors of Tarbert, James Hamilton Ord. 1836, Four Mangan Priests?, Fr De Coursey c1880's.

Folklore 1932 collection sample
Written by Nora Flaherty
Holy Wells
In Walsh's place in Tarbert, there is a Holy Well. Several used to pray there on Saturday. There was a tree growing beside it. Everyone who the used to pray would tie a piece of cloth to this tree. The old District Council tried to carry the well water into the Village. After one days work the well moved a hundred yards away.

In Mulvihill's place in Glin there was a Holy Well.

Lizzie Walsh Wrote
There is a Blessed well in Tarmons. It is in Buckley's farm. A servant girl went to the well for a bucket of water, when she was coming across the ditch her face turned. She then paid a number of rounds at the well and her face turned again. Another girl went to the same well and she took a bucket of water from it. When she took it home, she put it in the kettle to boil; they said that if it was there since it would not boil. There is a bush over the well and everyone leaves a piece of cloth after them hanging on the bush.

Prices 1941
Milk 2.5 old pence per pint, Bach Loaf per 4lb loaf 1 shilling, Petrol 2 shillings and 11 pence per Gallon ,Paraffin 1/6 per Gallon, Coal 5.5 pence per Stone , 2 oz of Tea 5 Pence, Animal Feed 21 Shillings per Cwt.

Listowel Show July 1951: First Prise for Purebred Hereford Bull went to Charles Fitzell Tarbert.

Some Kennelly's born in Tarbert area
To John K and Han Dore/ William 1866, To John K and Mgt Hanrahan/ Mary 1868, Mick K and Mary Kennelly/ Mary 1867, Denis k & Mary Leahy/ Mary 1866, Dan K & Kate Mahony/ Michael 1866, John K & Mgt Fitzgerald/ Tim 1866, Michael K & Nora Redmond / John 1866, Maurice K & Deborah Byrne / Margaret 1866, Tim K & Brid Lynch / Jer 1869, John k & Liz Mulvihill / Joan 1866, Pat K & Catherine Connor / Joan 1866, Michael K & Catherine........? / daughter Catherine in 1864, Pat K & Mary Anglim / Kate 1866, James K & Kate Shanahan / Mary 1865.

Sample Ballylongford Kennelly births
Con K & Kate Connell c 1830's had Kate, John& Michael. John K & Joan Mulvihill c1870 had Ned, Mike, Mary, John, Ann & Maurice. Martin K & Bridie Kissane c1840 had Martin, John, Jim & Mary. Martin K & Mary Stack in C1830 had Nora, Mary, Mgt, Tom, James & Martin. Mick K & Julia......? In c 1850 had Ann, Michael & Nora. Mick K & Joan Banbury? in c 1830 had Mary, John, Dick, and Con. Bill K & Joan Holly in c1840 had John. Bill K & Kate Morgan in c 1846 had Tim & John.

Death July 4th 1913: Cook County Illinois Michael Kennelly 4153 Wentworth Avenue a brother of John Martin Kennelly: Member of C.O.F. St Elizabeth Court 22 born Ballylongford buried Mount Olivet Cemetery.

 

Glin
Glencorby where the Fitzgerald's have lived for 700 years. They took the name Knights of Glin and lived at Glin Castle.
The Old Glin castle was attacked by George Carew in 1600 the Knight was killed and the Castle wrecked. The present Glin Castle was started c 1770.
In Tinnakilla there is an ancient chamber tomb and a pillar stone.

St Paul's Church Glin completed c1871; it replaced a Church built early years of 1800. St Paul's now a Heritage Centre.

Newtownsandes

The Vales of New Dirreen


Fare well, fare well, my native land farewell forever more,
I now must leave you far behind and seek a foreign shore,
For very soon the ocean wide between us will intervene,
In that dear old home its mine no more, in the vales of New Direen.

At home in dear old Ireland I fain for ever would stay,
But fate it has compelled for to wander far away,
From these native hills and valleys fair where blooms the shamrock green
In that dear old home its mine no more in the Vales of New Dirreen

In cold dark waves and Saxon lands we have known great joys and woes
And in that far off ocean wide where the stately Hudson flows
In Ireland too we have cherished hopes but seas are placed between
From that dear old home its mine no more in the Vales of New Dirreen

The sandowen seas I have crossed before and sought a foreign strand
But still I thought I soon would see again my native land
Its like John Mitchell in his cell where something tells unseen
Which makes me roam from my dear old home in the Vales of New Dirreen

When last I looked upon that place it was with a mournful eye
The tears fell trickling down my face and loudly I did cry
The pale of night it soon came down and that was the last I had Seen
of my dear old home its mine no more in Vales of New Dirreen

Now to Conclude those enfin lines fearing I should be late
The Mourning Train from Adagh starts at twenty five past eight
O God be with you Ireland your the starlight ocean Qeen
And a Fond farewell to all who dwell in the Vales of New Dirreen.

An old Ballad


Newtownsandes Famous People:
Thomas Moore his ancestors are said to have come from Newtownsandes.Tom Moore Poet born Dublin 28 of May 1779.He died 26th of Feb 1852 in his 73rd Year bured at Bromham near Devizes in Wiltshire England his Father was a Grocer till 1806 he later became a barrick master.It is thought his Mother had a great Influence on Him.After the Relief act of 1793 Catholics were allowed to enter TCD but were denied Degres.Mr Whyte Teacher of Tom Moore Entered him in TCD at the age of 15 as a Protestant.He left TCD in 1798 to Study Law in London.He Never Practiced Law writing was his Passion so in 1801 he Published his first Poems under the pen name of Thomas Little.Thomas Moore was Welcomed Everywhere he could Sing his own songs and Entertain in any Society.In 1803 he was Appointed as Registrar of the Admiralty Court at Bermuda.He stayed at his Post for a short while.Then put his Deputy in Charge while himself toured the U.S.A and Canada.More Poems were Published in 1806.Irish Melodies were Published in 1807.200 years Later his Irish Songs are still Popular all over the world.Actress Bessy Dyke Married Tom Moore in 1811.''Lalla Rookh'' was Published in 1817.Longmans Paid the Highest Price Ever for the Copy Right.About this time his Deputy in Bermuda Caused a huge loss and Moore was Liable to avoid Arrest he went to Paris and his Family Followed Him there.C 1822 he made a Bargain where the Claim Against him was Reduced to one sixth of the Original Claim which he paid he was now free to come home? iifig .....
In 1823 he visited Ireland with Lord Lansdowne after which he wrote a history of Captain Rock and His Ancestors which was well Recived.He was a friend of Emmet and Remembers him in ''O Breathe Not his name''.Other Historical works of Tom Moore, Life of Sheridan Published in 1825 it took 7 years to write, Life of Byron Pub 1830. Life of Lord Edward Fitzgerald Pub 1831.Travels of an Irish Gentleman in Seach of a Religion.Published 1834 also the History of Ireland was Published Later.
In 1845 all his Children and Sisters were Dead he said that he did not have a single Relative left in the world.


Tom Neville Stack
Information from Miss Mai Quillinan .
Tom Stack was married in Carrueragh Kilmorna , to Mary Neville of Carrigkerry . They had three sons the eldest born on christmas night 1849 was called Thomas Neville Stack . The second son Maurice Tom Stack married Mary Goulding their children were Tom Maurice and John Maurice Tom inherited the farm while John went to America . The third brother of Tom Neville Stack was called William he got a farm in Carrigkerry .
Mai Quillinans mother Ellie Stack was daughter of Maurice Tom Stack a brother of Tom Neville .
Mais father Michael Quillinan of Blossom Hill Rathkeale , Co Limerick . Tom Neville Stack Founded The Finance Union Journal in 1877 .It is reported that three generations before Tom Neville a member of the Stack family was a Butter Merchant in Cork who had a brother a Banker .
Another Stack Nicholas Moore Stack a man of culture and an actor taught at Maynooth and Carlow College .
Tom Neville himself was a Journalist a Financier and a Poet his second wife was a daughter of Mr Andrew Thunder of Dublin .
Mr Thunder went to Clongroves Wood College . He died aged 45yrs .
Mr and Mrs Stack were married for over 20yrs and had five children.
In 1895 Tom Neville Stack was one of the Founders of the British Homes Assurance Corporation Ltd. .
He was also an Officer in the 2nd London Rifles which was founded by Prince Albert .
Tom Neville Stacks views on Irish Banking are contained in the Blue Book which was issued by a committee of the House of Commons


Collins Newtownsandes Moyvane

Parish Clerks of Moyvane Fr Dillion About 100 years ago appointed Jack Collins as Parish Cleark who handed on the job to his Son Michael Collins.When he went to America his brother John Colling Filled the post.John Collins died Dec 9-1989 aged 78.

Mary Shine

Mary Shine of the Village Newtownsandes was appointed by Fr Dillion to look after the Alter Linen.

Tom Nevil Stack

Mr Tom Nevile Stack born Christmas 1849 in Carrueragh Knockanure Newtownsands and he EST a Jourrnal called ''The Finance Union'' in 1877.He was also one of the founding members of the British Homes Assurance Corp Ltd.His Cousin Mr Moore Stack was an actor C 1800 a Stack Man was a Butter Merchant in Cork.
Thomas Nevile Stack F.S. S. F.I.D. M.I.J. Died 22nd Sept 1913 in London.

More info Later.


Murhur
Listowel Churchyard

Erected by John Griffin Affoula in Memory of his Son
Michael d Oct 29th 1902 a 12.

Tim Connell d 1750 a 29 near Old Tower.

C Purcell d Sept 1813 a 90 Sons John and Tom.Daughter
Margaret d 27th ? ? 58 a 40 yrs.
Son John d 27-1-1861 a 62.

John Synan Clounmacon d Sept 1949 his Wife
Mary d July 1954.Their Son
John d Nov 1937.Their Son in Law
Eugene Sullivan d June 1978 his Wife
Elizabeth Synan d2-4-1983 .
Mgt Daly Synan d 1935 Wife of John Synan.
Edmond Synan d 18-2- 1988.
Nora Synan O Donoghue Dirha d Feb 7th 1964.
Mary Fitzmaurice Synan d Nov 3rd 1932 her Brother
Denis d 3-3-1952.
Mgt Synan Collins of Dirha E d 9th July 1994 a 72.Her Brother
John d 25-1-1990 a 69.
Ned d June 18th 1991 a 58.
John Synan Dirha E d 28-4-1964 a 80 his infant Son
Liam and Jer.
Patrick Joe d 30th Oct 1963 a 35.His Daughter
Hannah d 5th July 1950 a 10.
His Wife Hannah d 13th May 1983 a 84.

Br Sean O Dell CM died 24th June 1980 Buried Glasnevin His Father Edward O Dell Charles St d 8th July 1930 his wife
Mary d 3rd June 1952 . more.

William Stack Coolkeragh d 1946 ?
Pat d June 1953

Pat Mc Elligott Calif. 39 Fld Arty War 1 B 1888 d Sept 21st 1967.

John Mc Grath Coolaclarig his Wife
Elizabeth d July 23rd 1878 a 56.
Jer Shanahan Inchamore his wife
Mgt Died May the 7th 1912 aged 53 years his son
Jer Died 21st of January 1911 aged 14 years son
Michael Died October 3rd 1918 aged 29 years his daughter
Mrs Eileen o Connor Died 10th of the April 1992 aged 91

Denis Hayes Murroe and Tullamore Listowel Died 28th (?) 1985
Nora Hayes Died 1981

Ann Lane Islandanny Died 18th of October 1932
Pat Lane died 27th of May 1962 his wife
Ellen Died 10th of January 1963
Lizzie Lane Died 12th of January 1965, erected by her brother Patrick

Robert Smith Woodford Died 1915

Nora Kirby Keane 1871 - 1947 her son
Con Keane 1912 - 1969 granddaughter
Ciarra Bridget Moriarty (?)

Miss Bridget Lane Finuge d 13th March 1948
Mrs Bridget Lane d 12-12-1953.
Mrs Kit Lane d 17th Oct 196? .
Dan Lane d 4th Nov 1920 a 93.
Also Mrs ? Christmas nee Lane

John Duggans d 25-3-1977 a 91.

Mce J O Connell d 4-4-1940 his Brothers
Edward d 3-3-1925 .
John d 25th July 1919.
Tom d 1-3-1931. His Son
Tom B . d 8-1-1944, his wife
Mary d 8- 1-1979.

Michael Hennessy Convent Street d 17-2-1973, his parents
Michael and Bridget
O'Learys of the Island.

William Dore, Glenragh? D 24-12-1969

Michael O'Connor, Mounted Sergeant R.I.C. Union Quay Cork d 4-3-1915 aged 40 yrs, his child Harry d 10-3-1915, aged 15 Mts. .

Jennie Casey, Knockanure d 15-7-1954, her parents
Maurice and Elizabeth Casey
Her brother Maurice d 13-2-1960, her sister
Hannah Casey d 10-8-1966
Nora Casey d 19-7-1972, her husband
Con Clancy d 29-12-1974

John Galvin Patch d 20-12-1926, his wife
Mary J, Quill d 24-3-1945
Denis Galvin d 22-4-1973.

Han Hennessy her husband D,G. Hennessy d 24-4-1884

Michael Barrett d 2-6-1957 (Nts creamery manager)

Fr Maurice Carmody 1899-1940, his brother
Vincent 1910-1955 buried Australia.
Sister M. Canisus 1904-1980 buried in Limerick.
The Rev Robert W Keane d 1917 aged 63 yrs.

Tom Hennessy d 16-7-1927, his wife
Kate d 26-5-1918.

Fr Martin O'Connor P.P. d 31-5-1957, his sister
Catherine Daly, 18 Market Street d 19-3-1966

Margaret O'Connor Sullivan, Derry d 30-8-1975, aged 88yrs ?.
Rev Michael Enright born Listowel 1886 died 1972. Pastor of Carrolton.

Rev William Behan P.P. Cahirdaniel, 1941-1949,d 28-2-1968.

Pat O'Sullivan, Tullamore d 30-10-1954.

Jer P. Neville d 30-4-1921, his wife
Mary d 3-10-1959, their son
Jack d 1959.
Daughter Kit d 1991.

Mrs Mary D. Neville nee Murphy
Bridie Neville.
Danny Neville killed Arnhen 20-9-1944.
Dan Neville d 3-1-1970.

Annie Donegan nee Kennelly Dromin d 28-2-1943, her husband
Tom d 23-2-1959.
Tom Savage NT Knockalougha d 13-6-1943.

Catherine Prendiville, 67 Charles Street d 15-6-1961, her son
Jimmy d 14-8-1982.
Jack d 12-2-1977.

Kennelly family Dromin, erected by Ml Scannell.
John L Scannell Dromin.

Mary Kennelly nee Purcell Woodford d 20-4-1884, her husband
Pat d 12-6-1890, their son
James d 3-10-1919, his wife
Mary Harrington d 3-1-1911, their sons
James d 30-7-1951, his wife
Catherine Dower d 21-2-1953.
Paul Kennelly d 6-10-1962, his wife
Elizabeth Corkery d 29-12-1942.
James son of James and Catherine Dower d 4-4-1987.
Infant children.

Jer Carroll d 25-7-1916 aged 62 yrs.

Tom Marshall Market Street d October 1876.

Anna Corridan Murhur, d 22-4-1961, her husband
Michael d 26-4-1961.
Nora Curtin 14-3-1967.

Matt J Daly R.I.C., his wife
Mary, sons
Eugene and wife
Hannah.

Pat Relihan Dirha West d 26-10-1936, wife
Mary d 29-11-1938, sons
Pat and Kevin.

James Kissane Ahalanna, d 11-11-1929.

Our Mother Johanna Spillane d 21-3-1919 a 76.Her Son
David MD died London 29-3-1919 a 46.

Rev Mons D Hannon, Sydney d 17-7-1986, aged 94 yrs.

Cannon Dillon P.P. Listowel d 7-5-1943 aged 71 yrs.
Fr Michael Joe Kiely P.P. Sydney d 2-1-1982.

William Moloney d 26-9-1909, daughter
Nora d 18-4-1929.

Michael Kennelly of Listowel d 15-8-1891, age 72 yrs, his son
Michael d 23-10-1891 aged 18 yrs, his daughter
Elsie Agnes d Jan 1878 aged 24 yrs ?.
Erected by his wife.

Michael Kennelly d 8-1-1867, his wife
Elizabeth age 22 d 1867.
John Kennelly d 1954 (tailor).

Martin Joe Kennelly wife
Kate Spillane of Convent Street Listowel.

Jer Kennelly Bedford d 21-6-1947 wife
Catherine d 25-3-1930,
Pat Kennelly d 3-2-1965, his wife
Catherine Walsh d 10-9-1975.

Jer Kennelly William Street d 2-2-1939, his wife
Nora d 2-6-1943, their son
Maurice d 11-7-1918.
Grandson Gerald Fanning.

Tom Purcell Bridge Road d 26-4-1930,(musician) his son
Tom d 13-5-1938, his mother Kennelly of Clounmacon.

Martin Healy, wife
Elizabeth Godfrey Charles Street d 12-4-1983.

William Kennelly Dromin d 13-5-1961, his wife
Mary d 6-9-1971, daughter
Nora d 13-11-1948, parents
Martin Kennelly d 22-1-1919.
Nora d 2-4-1894, also
Hannah Kennelly d 28-3-1894.

Charles Purcell d 1873 ?.

Philip Healy d 1770.

Ellen O' Connor nee Keane d 16-7-1972.The Hill Knockanure.

John Daly d 25-2-1956, his wife
Mary O'Donoghue (Daly) d 16-4-1960,aged 73 yrs,

Bob Dore Charles Street d 19-4-1963.

James Moloney Coilagurteen d Sep 1960, his wife
Elizabeth d 26-3-1962.

? Brosnan d June 5th 1923 a 40yrs
Mary Moloney Brosnan Coilagurteen d 22nd June 1984 a 50.

Pat Stokes d 1907 aged 47 yrs.

Jer Foran 5 William St d 1922.
Baby Ann Foran.

John Relihan Bedford d 11-12-1978, his wife
Mary nee Broderick d 12-7-1981.

John Michael Galvin Irl Matt 3 USNKF, born 12-8-1893 d 26-9-1970.World War 1.

Maurice Kennelly Dentist d 13th May 1990

John Tierney 19 Market St d 14th July 1964.

Bridget Carr Ahalanna d 11-2-1954.

Mc Loughlin.

Tim Leahy Hon Sec of Sportsfield Committee d28-2-1908.

1506 Corporal D Daly Munster Fusiliers d 26-12-1918 a26.

Erected to Memory of Sarah O Carroll d 7-3-1862 a 82.

Callaghan O Callaghan NT in Memory of Son
Michael Joe O Callaghan d 1878 aged 30.

Ellen Carroll nee Wilmot Red Cottages d Sept 2nd 1977 her Husband
Tim d 21st June 1954 Buried Knockanure.

Catherine Wilmot d 19-4-1907.
Maurice Wilmot d 2-4-1930 Erected by Dau. Mary USA.

Edmond Wilmot Charles St d 2-2-1938 his Wife
Mary d 28th Sept 1955 Daughter
Catherine d 12-1-1948 Son
Dr Seamus Wilmot Registrar NUI d 28-1-1977 Son in Law
Michael Collins died 4th of July 1977 (?)

Dora Moriarty Died January 2nd 1937 aged 70
Rev Michael J Moriarty PP Surrey Died 26th of the Jan 1953 aged 59

Gerald Larkin Ballygrennan Died 21st of September
Ellen Larkin died 21st of July 1959 their son
Jeremiah Died 18th of January 1985

James Nolan and Family Knockane wife
Nora Died 13th of February 1983

Jer Enright Dromin Died 6th of March 1963 aged 81 years his wife
Nora Died 22nd of April 1946 aged 66 their son
Maurice Died 16th of January 1972 aged 55

Pat Lynch Carrueragh Died 13th of November 1968 his wife
Bridget Nee Keane Died 21st of February 1954

Lily Finucane Urlee Died 10th of November 1943 aged 42
Mary Ann Finucane Clounphrus Died 11th of September 1951 aged 73
William Finucane Do Died 23rd 1957 aged 88 years
Jack Finucane Do died 12-1-1975.
Maurice Finucane Do died 29-2-1988.

Michael Wall River View Tarbert d 7-2-1936 a 60.
Mary Wall d 1st Sept 1955 a 71.

Ellen Kennelly Main St d 21st June 1947 a76 ?.Her Brother
James P Kennelly d 6-1-1963 a 79.His Son in Law
Tim Kennelly of Skibereen d May 2nd 1968 a 51.
His Wife Mary Bridget Kennelly d 15th July 1988

Molly Greaney Billeragh d 12-12-1987 aged 100 Yrs .Her Husband
Tim d 4th Aug 1949 a 60. His Parents
Nora and Pat Greaney.

Pat and Alice Greaney their Daughters
Catherine ,Bridget Gill, Kate Denehy also James.

John Brennan Tarbert d 1956 ?

John Griffin Charles St d Nov 1st 1911 his Wife
Kate Sayers d 7-2-1937.

Sharry Dillon
Bridget Dillon nee Sharry Colbert Rd d June 14th 1975 her Parents
Pat Sharry d 1962.
Ciss nee Lacey d 1927. Her Brother
Michael d 1955.

Mary Griffin Ennismore d Nov 9th 1951.
Tim Griffin Do died 22-2-1964.
Catherine Griffin Do died 15-12-1977.

John Larkin Knockanure his Father
John d 25-3-1879 a 78 also his Mother
Mary d 23rd Sept 1900 a 70.

Tom Shanahan College Rd d 26-4-1981 a 88.

Nora Kennelly d 26 Nov ??

 

 

 

 

Tom Neville Stack Information from Miss Mai Quillinan . Tom Stack was married in Carrueragh Kilmorna , to Mary Neville of Carrigkerry . They had three sons the eldest born on christmas night 1849 was called Thomas Neville Stack . The second son Maurice Tom Stack married Mary Goulding their children were Tom Maurice and John Maurice Tom inherited the farm while John went to America . The third brother of Tom Neville Stack was called William he got a farm in Carrigkerry . Mai Quillinans mother Ellie Stack was daughter of Maurice Tom Stack a brother of Tom Neville . Mais father Michael Quillinan of Blossom Hill Rathkeale , Co Limerick . Tom Neville Stack Founded The Finance Union Journal in 1877 .It is reported that three generations before Tom Neville a member of the Stack family was a Butter Merchant in Cork who had a brother a Banker . Another Stack Nicholas Moore Stack a man of culture and an actor taught at Maynooth and Carlow College . Tom Neville himself was a Journalist a Financier and a Poet his second wife was a daughter of Mr Andrew Thunder of Dublin . Mr Thunder went to Clongroves Wood College . He died aged 45yrs . Mr and Mrs Stack were married for over 20yrs and had five children. In 1895 Tom Neville Stack was one of the Founders of the British Homes Assurance Corporation Ltd. . He was also an Officer in the 2nd London Rifles which was founded by Prince Albert . Tom Neville Stacks views on Irish Banking are contained in the Blue Book which was issued by a committee of the House of Commons Newtownsandes North Kerry T.C.D. Tennants. 1850 Landlords T.C.D. Tennants On 25th Dec 1671 Gortdromagowna was to become part of the Manor of Nohovell .Pierce Crosby of Dublin had a lease dated 22nd May 1722 for T.C.D. lands in the Parish .The lease was renewed to Sir Maurice Crosby of Ardfert , Henry Rose of Dublin , Pierce Crosby of Dublin for 21yrs from May 1739 rent per yr of £798 .Renewal to Maurice Crosby and others from Nov 1746 . William Talbot of Mount Talbot Co Roscommont took the lease for 21yrs from Nov 1768 .Talbots lease was renewed for 21yrs in 1773 . Renewed again for 21yrs from 1783. Ann Talbot widow of William got renewal when her husband died .In 1801 William Talbot renewed lease for 21yrs.Maxwell Blacker of Dublin, Barrister.Leased T.C.D. Lands For 21yrs from Nov 1823, He Renewed the Lease for 21 yrs from Nov 1839 the Tithe Charge £240.St. John Thomas.Blacker of Mullabrack Co Armagh, Renewed the Lease in 1843. 1850 Landlords Knockanure. T.C.D. St John T Blacker. George and William Sandes. Pierce Mahony. 1850 Newtownsandes Landlords. William V L Foster, T.C.D., Rev R Fitzgerald, St John T Blacker, John Dennis, Charles L Sandes, William Sandes, Stephen C Sandes, Edword Stokes, Stephen and William Roche, Edward Hudson of Tralee owned 450 AC in Kilbaha. All Tenants Had Sub Tenants,Most Sub Tennants had No Legal Protection and were at the Mercy of they Local land owner who used them for Cheep Labour, Many took what ever advantage they could get away with.Mr Nolan of Moyvane(Newtownsandes ) was a well known Rent Collector.Old People Remember a Notorious rent Collector Batta the Bailiff Connor.

 

 

 

1850 Boston Globe John Mulvuhill of Newtownsands . 6 yrs in USA lost Jane 2yrs ago his last sister was pointed from horsehead German county (chemung county) New York his sister Margaret Connell in new Orleans will he thank but for any information from his address to the care of N.W. Ryan Jackson st. 4th district, New Orleans. Daniel and Patrick Dunford of Newtownsands . Daniel was in Cleveland Ohio. Patrick sailed from Tralee on August 1851 for Quebec in the ship Nester. Information thankfully received by Timothy Flahavan, Hedgeville Beekley V.A 1850 Boston Globe advertising looking for Relations William Walsh of Inchamore . last learnt of was at Melville Mass . His son Edward Walsh would like the hear from him . Direct to Enoch train and co. 37 and 30 lewis wharf Boston . Richard Stack from Knockanure left Ireland in November 1851 in the "David Cannon" for New Orleans . When last heard from was in dearborn co., Indiana. A few times addressed to his wife Catherine Murphy . Alias Stack care of Mrs. Griffin 119 twelfth street Louisville K.Y. Will he carefully attended to William McAuliffe of Newtownsands . Who sailed from liverpool to Quebec in the ship "John Adams" on the 12th of September 1850. Any person knowing him will confer a favour on his brother by writing to John stokes McAulffe, Cavettsville westmoreland co. P.A. NEWTOWNSANDES The Football Feats of Jack Flavin John Murphy One of Moyvanes greatest footballer was born in Aughrim and grew up when Con Broshan was the best midfield player in Ireland from 1924 to 1932. At 19 he was on the Newtown (Moyvane) team which won North Kerry in 1928. At 20 he was of the Kerry junior team who won the all-Ireland in 1930. Two of that team also went of to greater honours –David o Keeffe and Roondy Landers. In 1931 he was of the team who won the National League and was sub the same year when they won the all-Ireland. In 1932 he was again sub in the 4 in a row win. Then politics began to rear its ugly head and a valley period in Kerry Football set in from 1933 to 1936. But back again in 1937. He was part of a forward machine which swamped Cavan in the replayed final –the other forwards were Purty and Roondy Landers, Miko Doyle, Charlie Sullivan and Tim o Leary. In 1938 he was on the Galway team which beat Kerry in a replay. In 1939 he won the National League with Galway. Still with Galway he won three more Connaught Championship medals only to be beaten twice by Kerry in the All- Ireland Finals of 1940 and 1941 –the third time by Dublin. Truly a great player. A local poet puts it better, Mick Roche played a great game at mid-field, but Flavin was peerless. That day for his equal is surely missing from football in Kerry today. All-Ireland Hurling Finals 1932 John Windle Sudden Death Kerryman Report April 1924 Sudden Death inListowel . At about 11oclock on fri a Fair Day in Listowel a small farmer of Aughrim moyvane .John Windle aged about 65 yrs collapsed and died . an Inquest was held that evening by Dr Clancy Coronor .Mr Martin Mulvihill merchant .Church St .foreman of the Jurey .Sergt P Flynn represented the State . Martin Mulvihill said that he and his father were born on the next farm to the deceased and knew him very well a delicate man who lived alone with a couple of children . Was neglected and perhaps had no proper nurishment either. Mr William Collins also knew deceased well was also present .Mr Maurice Healy of Ballygrennan said that deceased appeared to be in ordinary health shortly before he died . Dr T Buckley found that death was due to heart failure .A Verdict according to medical evidence was returned . Another Report in the same edition . Abbeyfeale Markets . 150 loads of hay @ 60 shillings upwards Calves 25s to 50s each . eggs 10d per doz. potatoes 1s 3d per stone. Oats 2s.

 

 

http://humphrysfamilytree.com/ORahilly/thomas.francis.html

Thomas Francis Rahilly

References:
Tribute to Thomas Francis Rahilly, sitting of Listowel Petty Sessions Feb 1899, by Gerald Mc Elligott, JP.
Letter from T.F. Rahilly (age 17) to his brother Richard Rahilly, from Harrisburgh, Pennsylvania, Aug 1866. Was in [Aodogán's papers].

Julia O'Rahilly grave, Glasnevin Cemetery, Dublin. Location: nH 34.5. Go in gate, to left, quite a bit down, down path on right, grave is on left.


Sources yet to be consulted:
Kerry Evening Post, 1st Mar 1899.
Kerry Sentinel, 1st Mar 1899.
St.Michael's College, Listowel, 1879-1979, co-editor J.Anthony Gaughan, 1979.

 

 

 

Thomas Francis Rahilly,
Tom, born 8th Jan 1849, Ballylongford, Co.Kerry,
NOT educ St.Michael's College, Listowel (founded 1879),
think NOT educ Blackrock College (think both of these are confusion with his son Thomas Francis),
went to seminary in Limerick to study for the priesthood, found had no vocation, left it [O'Rahilly, 1991],
he went to America (where Civil War just over 1865),
wrote letter to his brother Richard Rahilly, from Trout St, Harrisburgh, Pennsylvania, Aug 1866 (him age 17): "My dear old Dick, I am just after getting up after last night's fun. I had a jolly good night at a ball, lots of the handsomest girls I ever saw. .. Many's the time I wished I had you with me here, and many's the time I think over the great smokes we had together. .. I'm entirely my own master NOW. Marlo tried to keep me down but he saw it was no good, so he gives me plenty of pocket money now. I am as happy as a king. .. Half past three I am just after breakfast", he says he is about to have a smoke and an iced champagne "to settle my stomach .. now don't show this letter to Mama or she might write to Marlo about me and then he'd show me the doors. She does not know what a place this is at all and indeed it would not be pleasant to" [tell her],
he does not seem to know that his mother died Jan 1866 and he is now an orphan, his brother Michael Joseph also died Apr 1866,
he worked for few years in Rahilly business in Ballylongford,
then moved to oversee family's business interests in Tarbert, Co.Kerry (an off-shoot of the original business in Ballylongford), he managed a general store and importing business, he is listed as "draper" and "shopkeeper" in [GROI], also became Postmaster for Tarbert,
as importer he supplied the shops of the area, and it was probably on his rounds that he met Julia Curry, daughter of a shop keeper, of Glin, Co.Limerick,
mar 1871 to Julia Curry [born 24th June 1854],
she married at 17, conceived at 17, gave birth to first child at 18, gave birth to 15 children over 26 years, last one just before husband's death, when she was age 44,
eldest child born Glin, Co.Limerick, 1872,
they are listed as living Tarbert, Co.Kerry, 1873 through 1881 (children's births),
the story was he was highly intelligent, likeable, but irresponsible, used drink heavily, got to be real problem,
she was remembered as a very capable, literary person, very competent in keeping family together through her husband's drinking, and after his early death,
she imposed on Richard and on her own family to pay for children's education (those who didn't get scholarships), some of daus educated at convent boarding school, Longford - Richard Rahilly paid for that,
she was "most ambitious for her children, she monitored their school progress, sought advice on what was best for each, and saw to it that they went to select schools" [Gaughan, 1986], strict household, children not allowed to associate with anyone outside the family after school,
she was very pretty, Aodogán said Richard's wife Ellen was constantly annoyed because Richard was always going over to see if she was OK when Tom was drinking,
the story was the business in Tarbert went bust due to Tom's drinking,

the post of Clerk of Petty Sessions in Listowel, Co.Kerry, became vacant 1881, Tom applied for it, and was awarded the post "not least because of the considerable influence exercised on his behalf by Richard" [Gaughan, 1986],
he is listed as Clerk of Petty Sessions at his son Michael Joseph's death, Feb 1881, when still living in Tarbert,
in 1881 he moved to big house, 6 The Square, Listowel, Co.Kerry, he didn't build it, he leased it, the house was church property,
living Listowel, Co.Kerry, 1882 through 1898 (children's births),
listed as Clerk of Petty Sessions, Listowel, in [Thom's] 1883 and 1884,
as a child Alfred remembered Parnell speaking in The Square in Listowel Oct 1891, there was no great excitement in the family, they were "total conformers", Alfred remembered hearing Michael Davitt speaking at that meeting also,
Thomas Francis had a bad drink problem, Anno remembered that "it was a regular chore for her father to get word that Uncle Tom was on the booze again .. would have to drop everything and go off to Listowel to take Tom to a 'drying out' clinic in Roscrea or Mount Mellary" [O'Rahilly, 1991], apparently last time he was in Roscrea he was "cured",
his brother Richard died 1896,
he is still listed as Clerk of Listowel Petty Sessions in Kerry Evening Post, 1 Apr 1896 (after brother's death),
on his deathbed he confessed there was never a day in his life that he did not have an irresistable craving for drink,
he died 25th Feb 1899, age 50 yrs,
baby Ena (born Dec 1898) was sick at the same time, Bernadette Griffin was later told by an aunt that Julia asked God to take the baby but not her husband, but her husband said no, he would rather that he died than his daughter Ena,
Richard and Tom both now dead, Julia left a widow with 13 children, age 0 to 26,
who paid school and university fees after this?, did Richard's widow Ellen help?,

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1. Name of applicant Joseph Stokes 2004- 2005 details

 

 

 

3. School Mechanical and Manufacturing Engineering

 

4. Sub-panel nomination Science/Engineering

 

5. Centre / UDRC affiliations Materials Processing Research Centre (MPRC) and National

 

Centre for Plasma Science and Technology (NCPST)

 

 

 

I joined the academic staff of the School of Mechanical and Manufacturing Engineering in

 

2001, halfway through my PhD studies here in DCU. Despite high teaching pressure and new

 

modules, I completed my PhD in 2003. The start of my independent research career started a

 

little over a year and a half ago. During this time I have made strides in forging my own profile by

 

attracting postgraduate students and forming industrial links in the emerging area of

 

Bioengineering. This has been enhanced by the recent addition of powder processing and

 

characterisation equipment from Enterprise Ireland into the MPRC. The HVOF (High Velocity Oxy

 

Fuel) Thermal Spray process available in-house can now produce superior deposits as a result of

 

my PhD research in the area.

 

 

 

I started my PhD in 1997 and the aim of my PhD project was to produce free-standing

 

tungsten carbide-cobalt (WC-Co) components using the HVOF Thermal Spraying process. This

 

involved a scientific evaluation of the residual stress build up within 'thick' spray-formed WC-Co

 

components. This was achieved by numerical and finite element analysis coupled with

 

experimentation and characterisation (phase and microstructural development) techniques in

 

order to control residual stress. The result of this research show that there is the possibility of

 

producing deposits with thicknesses 900% greater than that published previously.

 

In 1999 I was involved with the tender, facility design and purchase of a Plasma Spray

 

Facility in conjunction with the National Centre for Plasma Science and Technology (NCPST,

 

which was funded under PRTLI 5.

 

In 2002, I contributed to the “SprayNet Framework 5 European Thematic Network Group”

 

proposal, which was successful. This three-year project involves nineteen European members,

 

drawing a literature search of activities used in Spray Drying techniques. I am specifically

 

investigating the spray drying effects on various thermally sprayed powders. A PhD student I

 

supervise is funded under this scheme.

 

I was a member of the RAP committee while my colleague was out on leave and I have been

 

promoted to Lecturer above bar level in 2004. I have recently supervised my first PhD student to

 

completion.

 

My publications include two peer reviewed Journal papers* (both in Surface and Coatings

 

Technology) and four Conference papers* (21st International Manufacturing Conference, Limerick

 

(2004), International Conference on Metallurgical Coatings and Thin Films, San Diego USA

 

(2003), International Thermal Spray Conference, Montreal Canada (2001), Advances in Materials

 

and Processing Technology, Dublin (1999)). I have three other journal papers in preparation with

 

my present postgraduates at the present. As an output of my research I have written a book on

 

Thermal Spraying, which is due to be brought to its editing stage.

 

 

AA Young Stockperson Intermediate Final

 

October 30, 2009

David Goulding was second in the overall championship at the Young Stockperson Intermediate Finals of the Aberdeen Angus Cattle Society which took place in Carlisle. David qualified at a workshop on the farm of Tim and Doreen Corridan, Co. Limerick, earlier in the year and travelled across to Carlisle along with four other Republic of Ireland finalists. A total of 30 youngsters from England, Scotland, Wales, Northern Ireland and the Republic of Ireland participated in the event, which was judged by Bridget Borlase from the Sacombe Simmental herd.

 

 

 

The Queen of the Land festival takes place in Tullamore, Co. Offaly November 12th-14th and this year promises to be the best one yet.

 

 

 

http://www.archive.org/stream/journalofroyalso40royauoft/journalofroyalso40royauoft_djvu.txt

 

"The journal of the Royal Society of Antiquaries of Ireland"

Snippet

 

Knockanure

 

 

THE CLEEEOE (O.S. 13-14). The Cladh-ruadh, or lied Ditch,

phonetically called "Cleeroo" was first, I believe, noted in 1756, by

Dr. Charles Smith. 1 Many have quoted, but none seem to have

extended or re-examined his description. Let this be my excuse for

giving this imperfect account, for I only saw comparatively short

portions at opposite ends of the Head. Smith says that " an ancient

boundary called in Irish Glee Ruad, or the lied Ditch, begins at a place

called Cahercarbree, near Kerry Head, and runs toward the Cashin,

where, on the other side of that river, it appears again, crossing the

mountain of Knockanure, and runs into the County of Limerick." The

Knockanure mentioned is not the brown hill of that name, so familiar to

visitors at Bally bunnion and those travelling on the Shannon or in south-

eastern Clare, but a place, half way between Listowel and Athea, near

which village and within the bounds of county Limerick traces of the

" Cladh " are also found.

 

The word " cladh," like every other Irish name for ancient entrench-

ments, tells us little, if anything, of its object or character. The Dagda,

that divine fort-builder, trenched Rathbrese, and is described standing

in its "cladh."- Early writers apply the word to the rampart of that

 

1 " Kerry," p. 219.

 

2 The double entrenchments must be remotely ancient, as the trench " Slicht

loirge

 

 

 

PROMONTORY FORTS IN THE COUNTY KERRY. 127

 

Tara fort where King Laoghaire was buritjd upright and in arms ; while

Adamnan uses it for an ordinary bank or dyke. 1 In Clare the peasantry

call an entrenched hill " Cladh na ngall." The works possibly date from

Richard de Clare's repulse, in 1315, when marching by the shortest route

from Bunratty against the Bruce's invading hosts.z The ditch commences,

not at Cahercarbery, but some 1100 feet to the north of that fort, at the

edge of an abrupt cliff. Perhaps it once commenced at a bay, or fort,

long since obliterated by the sea. The entrenchment is not defensive,

like the Duncladh, Worm Ditch ("cladh na peiste"), or Dane's Cast in

Ulster and the great works of the Raduff in Idrone, Co. Carlow, 3 or that

on the border of Limerick and Cork. Nor does it resemble the parallel

mounds of the ancient roads in Co. Limerick and Co. Waterford, which

are called " Itian Bo." If a mearing, it is strange to find it so regardless

of natural features ; it begins at a cliff, runs through the middle of a

peninsula and over hills, plains, and rivers, regulated by no recognizable

point of the compass or prominent mountain, without tradition in any

early book or modern legend to explain its object, or to cover the

ignorance of the inhabitants of the district.

 

At its western end the ditch is only 3 or 4 feet wide and deep, with

a mound of earth and stones to the south, rarely over 6 feet thick or a

foot or two high. One might cross it without suspecting it to be more

than a defaced field ditch ; but as you follow it up the hill, doubt as to

its

being anything noteworthy vanishes. It runs towards the E.S.E. straight

up the hill (cutting at one point through a ridge of rock) for about

4500 feet through Tiduff, and vanishes on the moorland about 6000 feet

from the cliff. No trace is recorded for about 2 miles, when the Cladh

suddenly reappears on the moor near the eastern summit of Maulin Hill,

in Dromatoor. It runs in a nearly straight line eastward through

Doonamontane and Knockane, forms the south mear of Glenlea, and

continues in a south-easterly course by an old path in Booleenshare,

beyond which it is lost, while a considerable group of ring forts appears.

In all the Cladh extends for nearly 2 miles. We know of no further

trace, but commend the search to local workers. Thence, if Smith be

accurate, it ran to the Cashen, between which river and the "cladh" a

track of an old road is shown on the map (No. 16). This begins at

Ballynegara, near Lixnaw, running through it, Ballyhennessy, and

Clooncolla to the bounds of Ballyhorgan, near Ballintogher, in a north-

 

an Dagdae" was attributed to the Dagda (Battle of Moyturu, p. 87), and made

by the

prongs of his fork.

 

1 " Battle of Moytura, p. 65. Bind Senchas of Tara, and Adamnan's "Life of

St. Columba."

 

2 Journal, xxi., p. 464. The hill seems to have had marks of triple

entrench-

ments in 1839, but only one ring is shown on the map, and only slight traces

of this

one remained even in 1891.

 

3 See Mercator's map of Idrone ; led by this, O'Donovan and O'Curry found

traces of the " Gripe of the Black Pig" in Kellymount, 1839 (0. S. Letters,

Kil-

kenny, vol. ii., p. 254).

 

 

 

128 ROYAL SOCIETY OF ANTIQUARIES OF IRELAND.

 

easterly direction. The ring forts lie mainly beside the present road

through Causeway, which on that account is probably an ancient line of

traffic, if not the successor of the Cladh-ruadh itself. Perhaps these

lines represent the " Toghers of Lixnaw," made, with the bridge, after

1312 by Nicholas, Lord of Kerry. The names " Ballintogher," near

the more northern track, and "Causeway" support the latter view,

while not excluding the former.

 

After passing the Cashen and Galey rivers and Knockanure, it was

next found at Athea. As we have endeavoured to show, the famous

fortress of Tara Luachra lay near Portrinard, 1 between Athea and

Abbeyfeale, and may have been the objective of the Cladh. Southward,

near Abbeyfeale, another ditch commences, called the Cladh dubh or

Cleeduff (Black Ditch), and eventually the Cladh-buidhe or Cleebwee

(Yellow Ditch). The Rev. J. Begley 2 most kindly gave me notes on its

course. He says : " The Cladh Dubh runs from Abbeyfeale Hill through

the townlands of Diumtrasna, Bally commane, Tournafulla, and the

commons of Cleanglas." He heard that it was found at Drumroe, a part

of Killeedy Hill. "It is a small, flat ditch passing through the town -

lands," and is made of crumbling, boggy clay. " The Cleanglas people

call it ' Cladh-buidhe,' and say they always heard it ran from sea to sea."

It seems to have continued to Rathgogan, near Charleville, in Co. Cork,

where it was called the Cladh-dubh-na-ratha, "the Black Ditch of

Rath" (gogan).

 

There is (it may be remembered) a similar work near Lismorc, in

Co. Waterford, running along the foot of the Knockmealdown Mountains,

and called the Cladh-dubh. This joined the double-fenced Rian-bo,

running from Ardmore to Ardfinnan, and possibly once to Cashel; but

whether it ran westward to join its namesake near Charleville remains

to be tested.

 

Father Begley tells me further that "there is part of a very formidable

rampart between the counties of Cork and Limerick to the west of

Tullylease. Some poor people, about thirty years ago, levelled a part of

it, built houses upon the foundations, and enjoyed the privilege of being

in neither county, as they managed to arrange the door in such a way as

to evade the law. I cannot say that this is part of the old Cladh. I

thought at one time that it might be the fosse filled up by Meyler

fitz Henry in the Co. Limerick, and referred to in Sweetman's Calendar."

It is much to be hoped that, before the remains and traditions now

perishing so rapidly get absolutely lost, some worker may emulate the

valuable work of Rev. Canon W. H. Lett, Rev. Patrick Power, and

Mr. De Vismes Kane 3 by tracing and recording the long earthwoiks,

 

1 Proc. E.I. A., vol. xxvi. (c), p. 62.

 

14 Who first recorded this remarkable "track": see " Diocese of Limerick,''

p. 25.

 

3 Journal, vol. xxviii., p. 1, and vol. xxxv., p. 110; Proc. R.I. A., vol.

xxvii.

 

 

 

PROMONTORY FORTS IN THE COUNTY KHRRY. 129

 

whether tribal bounds or entrenched roads, of the early Irish in

Clanmaurice and elsewhere.

 

An incidental allusion to the Cladh-dubh in 1642 shows that it was

known as a road on the borders of Limerick and Kerry. In the Deposition

of Edward Vaucher, March 21st, 1643, he says that, when sent, ahout

midsummer last (1642), by Sir Edward Denny from Cork into Kerry to

prevent the garrison of Tralee from surrendering to the Confederates,

" he was by the way taken prisoner about the Slack Walk, in the middle

of the mountains called Slieve Lougher, by Teigue Mac Auliff, of Castle

Mac Auliffe, Conoghor Clough, near Liscarroll, and others, who brought

him to Adare, where he was exchanged for Captain James Browne." 1

The Black Ditch, in far later times, used to be followed by people having

to drive cattle over Slieve Luachra. There was also a Cassan-na-bo-ruadh,

or Red Cow's Path, from Inchigeela Lake to Tobbernakilla, on the

mountains of Muskerry, in Western Cork, said to have been made by a

fairy cow, 2 but probably originating in the prosaic fact of being used by

local drivers. Cork has also another legend of a "Bo ruadh," red (or

skinless) cow, which, with two fine calves, came from Coolacleevaun to

be milked in Lisduff fort. The peasantry carried off the calves, but the

cow pursued, recovered her young, and disappeared with them into a

fort. A similar legend is told of a "Bo vaun," white cow, and her two

calves, but she fled to Gaorha Island, in the Kiver Lee. 3 Not to multiply

examples of such legends, the double lines of the Rian-bo-phadruig

trenches at Ardpatrick, Co. Limerick, and Ardmore, Co. Waterford, are

alleged to be made by the horns of St. Patrick's cow, 4 while the Ulster

and Carlow lines were rooted by the formidable "Black Pig," 5 and the

Worm Ditch was made by the sinuous track of a huge serpent.

 

 

 

1 I must acknowledge kind help from Rev. J. Begley as to the Cladh dubh ;

Mr. M. J. M'Enery in many questions of the records ; and Dr. G. U. MacNamara

in

photographic matters. Mr. J. Cooke kindly lent me a plan of the "cave" at

Ballybunnion Castle ; but as it seemed, from what I saw on the spot, to he

unconnected with that structure, it was better in so long a paper to adhere

to my

original plan.